Food Trucks

Florida Town Booted Food Truck Offering Meals to Hurricane Survivors After Nearby Restaurant Complained

Mayor says the town doesn't ban food trucks, but only allows them on certain days. And that's one rule that can't bend even in the wake of a major hurricane.

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Scott Keeler/ZUMA Press/Newscom

A few days after Hurricane Irma blasted through the town of Green Cove Springs, Florida, Jack Roundtree drove his Triple J's BBQ truck downtown to give residents a hot lunch and hand out free bar-be-que to utility workers trying to get the power restored.

It didn't take long for the cops to show up.

According to Clay Today, a news website for the community south of Jacksonville, the cops told Roundtree his food truck had to go. City manager's orders. Roundtree didn't have a permit to operate in Green Cove Springs, and not even the aftermath of a devastating hurricane was going to stop the city government from enforcing that law.

Local resident Bettie Tune witnessed the incident and later posted on Facebook about it.

Brandi Acres, a spokeswoman for the Green Cove Springs Police Department, confirmed to Reason that a food truck was sent away on the day after Irma struck, but Acres said she could not provide any additional details on the incident or confirm the name of the food truck. An employee at Triple J's BBQ confirmed the incident occured but declined to answer any questions or comment.

Green Cove Springs Mayor Mitch Timberlake this morning says he did not consider Roundtree's gesture "a Good Samaritan situation." Had the operators of the food truck come to city officials and asked for permission, Timberlake says, officials would have been happy to direct the food truck to where utility workers were in need of food.

"That didn't happen," he said.

A local restaurant complained to city officials about the rogue food truck set up along U.S. Route 17 near downtown, Timberlake said. The city licenses food trucks only a few days per year for festivals or celebrations, like Memorial Day, the mayor says.

"He is a commercial food truck operator, and he knows the local ordinances for food truck operation and had a responsibility to reach to the city to get a permit for what he wanted to do," Timberlake says. "We don't prohibit food trucks. There are times and places where we welcome them."

The aftermath of a devastating hurricane is not one of those times. Timberlake spoke of the "tremendous debris" in the wake of the storm, and 90 percent of the city was without power. More than 100 trees were down across the city and extensive property damage to homes along the St. James River, which flows past the city. Half of the city was still without power Wednesday when the Triple J's food truck got the boot.

With all of those challenges, it was remarkable city officials and police could maintain their focus on rules protecting unsuspecting hurricane victims from a hot meal on wheels. And quite a feat for a restaurateur to look past the devastating damage to track down city officials (city hall was closed; they operating from an emergency management shelter) and rat out one lousy food truck.

Ari Bargil, an attorney with the Institute for Justice, a national libertarian law firm, said the incident in Green Cove Springs illustrates the problems that food truck entrepreneurs can face in many localities around the country.

"This guy was trying to feed people who had few other options in the aftermath of a hurricane," Bargil says. "This is a perfect example of how overblown regulations burden entrepreneurs."

Bargil is the lead attorney on a lawsuit challenging food truck regulations in Baltimore, where city officials have banned food trucks from operating within 300 feet of an brick-and-mortar restaurant. The case will go to trial next week in Maryland state court.

Timberlake says he doesn't see his city's policies as discriminatory towards food trucks or protectionist towards restaurants. "The local citizenry wants to have a healthy restaurant business," he says. "The people who come into town, put up a business, have a building, employ numbers of people from the town deserve to make sure that someone doesn't come in and set-up next door to them without the overhead costs they endured and run a business."

Towns are allowed to write their own rules, of course. If the local government wants to shut out one form of business in favor of another—well, that's probably a mistake. But it's hardly the only place to make it.

Still, how important are the rules for one food truck during an emergency? Negligible to hungry, tired people cleaning up and trying to get their power back. Still, Green Cove Springs showed a commitment to protectionism under duress that's difficult to match.

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  1. “a Good Samaritan situation.” Had the operators of the food truck come to city officials and asked for permission, Timberlake says, officials would have been happy to direct the food truck to where utility workers were in need of food.

    Is there a more chilling statement? Nearly making explicit their idea that good Samaritanism can only exist when directed by the state.

    1. Just like any charitable work. Most of it used to be “good deeds” or “alms for the poor”, now it’s a government run clusterfrak.

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    2. If he had come and bent the knee…

      1. …of the mayor with a baseball bat.

    3. Nearly making explicit their idea that good Samaritanism can only exist when directed by the state.

      And only when the recipients are state employees.

    4. FASCISM DEFINED: government control of private means of production.

      A food truck is a private means of production, unless the government OWNS that truck then its communism.

      This is good ol boy protectionism of the sort that used to run New York City and Chicago (and likely still does, but far more subtly than formerly). That restaurant that complained… what is their relationship to the city manageress, the cops, whoever else stepped forward to make this happen? Whose campaigns have they supported in the past?

      And HOW wasthis food truck operator from outside that little two bit town supposed to know he had to go find the city hooh hahs and ask them “Pretty please Mother May I with cherries on top?”

      Some places if gummit don’t do it they won’t let anyone else do it either. SOunds a lot like Venezuela these days, except that the guy lived to tell about it. And to pay the fine they’ll likely impose on him.

    5. The mayor’s answer is hogwash. They could have directed the food truck there rather than telling it to leave. Obviously, the politicos just wanted the truck to go without any investigation or trying to find a solution.

  2. Towns are allowed to write their own rules, of course. If the local government wants to shut out one form of business in favor of another?well, that’s probably a mistake.

    That’s not that obvious of a statement. Towns are often preempted from creating their own rules. This is definitely a hard issue, as if you go far enough to restrict small confederacies from doing things then you are clearly limiting free action. Though in this case, I think this is an obvious restriction of free action at the force of a small vested interest.

    1. Not to mention that anyone can “write rules.” You and I can “write our own rules” whatever that means. It’s not that rules were written, it’s that petty rules were enforced with threats of violence.

      1. ^ This.

        Culturally we’re becoming a society absolutely free of discretion. Rules are rules and we as a Sophisticated and Lawful People will absolutely never reason for ourselves. Instead, we take a kind of bizarre pride in convoluted rules that lead us into all kinds of irrational behavior, because it superficially resembles “civilization.”

        1. And your house won’t be worth as much.

    2. This is definitely a hard issue, as if you go far enough to restrict small confederacies from doing things then you are clearly limiting free action. Though in this case, I think this is an obvious restriction of free action at the force of a small vested interest.

      I certainly agree that it’s a hard issue. While, on the one hand, the trucks are certainly being good samaritans, the local businesses have ‘invested’ in local infrastructure that the regional food trucks haven’t and may not be invested in long term. I don’t think the solution is government, but I can see how this would be effectively draining capital from local restaurants in an unfair manner at a time when they need capital the most.

      I mean, equality of opportunity is nice and all but if the 14th exists, there’s no real reason that inequality of opportunity doesn’t exist on the basis of geography (relative to hurricanes). I think the church/alms situation GroundTruth mentions above is a great solution as it dispels the notion that the church is going to set up shop and start competing with local restaurants.

      1. Edit: there’s no real reason to think that

      2. It’s not a hard issue at all. If the town’s statutes prohibit food trucks on Tuesdays to keep them from competing with established restaurants, you ignore those statutes when the food truck is helping starving people on a Tuesday after a major hurricane.

        1. If the town’s statutes prohibit food trucks on Tuesdays to keep them from competing with established restaurants, you ignore those statutes when the food truck is helping starving people on a Tuesday after a major hurricane.

          First, people aren’t starving. This isn’t somalia. Second, if people are starving, they’re on the other side of washed out bridges and wetlands that FEMA, the Red Cross, et al. are trying to truck food across and looking for people to help. Either way, Joe Blow’s Taco Truck isn’t there entirely out of the goodness of their heart.

          Third, you’re falsely portraying the situation (or not making distinctions the article implies). At least, when I hear “give residents a hot lunch and hand out free bar-be-que to utility workers” I think there’s some intrinsic difference between giving and handouts. It strongly suggests they were selling food to the locals who’s kitchens and local KFCs got demolished and giving it away to utiilty workers.

          1. “giving” implies providing at no cost to the recipients, as does “handouts” to the utility workers. Had the article stated “sell to” or “provide” then your supposition could be assumed from the text of the article.If I “give” something, it is transferred for no compensation.

            1. I know it’s not trendy but read the linked article;

              Jack Roundtree had barely set up his food truck in at the old Rich’s restaurant in Green Cove Springs. His customers, robbed of electricity by Hurricane Irma, were just lining up for lunches of hot barbecue, when two police cruisers pulled into the parking lot.

              (emp. mine)

              It’s not clear whether Roundtree was invited by whomever owned “Rich’s Restaurant” or not. Reason’s presentation almost seems deliberately vague or even slanted.

              Here is a picture of the truck parked in reserved spaces, presumably in front of the aforementioned restaurant. Libertarians still property rights in the event of a hurricane, right? Also, if your business model leans heavily on a destructive force of nature would that be a violation of the NAP?

            2. The article I cited goes on:

              Roundtree said that the didn’t want Palatka to do the same thing that Green Cove Springs did and shut him down. The officer called Palatka’s mayor, who said that anyone with hot food could serve it because the city had no power and all restaurants were shut down.

              However, by the time the officer got in contact with the mayor, Roundtree had other commitments, Clay Today reported.

              Lots and lots of features that distinguish this story from The Good Samaritan parable that I learned.

      3. Really? A food truck is the same as a brick and mortar sit down restaurant with waiters?
        Is a cloth seat pickup truck the same as a leather clad Cadillac?
        What part of “local infrastructure” did the restaurant build? I will bet your next paycheck that they moved into a rented space, and did not add a single brick to the building or a layer of pavement to the street.

        1. A food truck is the same as a brick and mortar sit down restaurant with waiters?

          I will bet your next paycheck that they moved into a rented space, and did not add a single brick to the building or a layer of pavement to the street.

          Sure as long as I can bet that same paycheck that the developer they rented from didn’t bulldoze the lot, run the municipal lines, pave the parking lot to municipal code and then, out of the goodness of his heart, charge them rent not just at no profit, but at a rate commensurate with an undeveloped lot.

          I don’t know the exact situation, but ‘downtown’ is pretty vague and while I haven’t been to the specific downtown in question, my general experience of downtowns suggests that pretty much anywhere Joe parked his truck was easily debatable as being owned or maintained by a restaurant. Seems like it would’ve been pretty dead simple for Joe to get invited to a private lot and sell from there, but it’s not clear that that’s what happened.

          1. Never been to this two bit town, but in that part of the country it seems likely the resstaurant occupies an old downtown building in a block amongst a few other blocks that was developed back before 1920. Most such downtown areas have little to no in way of empty lots the truck could have hired. Further, I’d eagerly lay high stakes at long odds that that uppity city would have a year’s worth of regulatioins and prohibitions and conditions and mandated improvements before the truck could set up and operate from that lot, IF said lot existed. There is no way things could have been cleared for operation even within three months…. let alone three days, in time to HELP some of the storm victims.

            1. an old downtown building in a block amongst a few other blocks that was developed back before 1920.

              This is Florida, not Maine or Arizona. If a hurricane doesn’t come by every couple of decades to topple the buildings, the swamps reclaim it. Everything else is either made of crumbling concrete, is relatively new, or is “meticulously” maintained. I’ve eaten in plenty of restaurants in the state that were built in the 20s and, again, they don’t generally jive with the notion of downtown.

              The point being, the local restaurants probably did pay into city coffers and were effectively locked out of their location by the hurricane and/or the city. The mayor actually did have a good reason to turn away the food truck and should’ve at least redirected them to a more needed area. Instead, he was a dick and chose the FYTW option instead. At the same time, if a destructive force of nature is the competitive advantage to your business model, you’re a dick and I won’t shed many tears if some of the locals think you’re being opportunistic and want to run you out of town.

      4. Government does not exist to protect the “investments” of incumbent businesses.

        1. but the incumbent businesses certainly seem to think so, and the city gummit hooh hahs act like it IS their job.

      5. except that under present gummit ‘thinking” any food the church/charity distributes is food the restaurant cannot SELL because that tummy is now full.

        1. This is nonsensical. And I don’t mean that I don’t agree with you, I mean that you just aren’t making sense or didn’t read what I wrote.

          The government isn’t hovering around counting the number of free meals any church/charity gives out and couldn’t exactly prevent a church/charity from giving the meals away for free even if it did. This is a big part of the reason Roundtree’s food truck got in trouble in the first place. They have no idea how much money he made or how many meals he sold.

          The issue isn’t that the food truck was feeding people, it’s that it was feeding people commercially. The Church might displace some customers in a time of crisis but they aren’t establishing themselves as direct competition.

          Look, we have no idea who the tattle-tale business is, at the same time, we know twitterers and twitter itself to be an equally obnoxious tattling engine. So, for wall we know, we’ve got a food truck parked on a restaurant’s private property and a part owner or loyal customer twittering about how unfair it is that they can’t sit outside of the local Denny’s and rather literally take their business directly off their property (while they do repairs mandated by the city).

          But, you know, food trucks! Kulchur! Outrage! Moral superiority! Yay!

          1. RE: The government isn’t hovering around counting the number of free meals any church/charity gives out and couldn’t exactly prevent a church/charity from giving the meals away for free even if it did.

            Well, yes they are. Just do a google search to see how many cities are regulating churches right out of feeding the poor.

            Overreaching and overbearing governments are doing this a lot. Time to drastically reduce their size & scope.

      6. the local businesses have ‘invested’ in local infrastructure that the regional food trucks haven’t and may not be invested in long term.

        Call them “undocumented” food trucks.

        1. Call them “undocumented” food trucks.

          Sure, and when you’re forced to evacuate you home and, upon returning, find people parked in your driveway selling food from your porch you, on principle/under any circumstances, won’t call the police, right? It’s your property but libertarianism dictates invariably NAP before property. It is known.

  3. “Fuck you, hungry workers. Your choice was removed because someone didn’t ask my permission. Remember me Election Day!”

  4. Green Cove Springs Mayor Mitch Timberlake this morning says he did not consider Roundtree’s gesture “a Good Samaritan situation.” Had the operators of the food truck come to city officials and asked for permission, Timberlake says, officials would have been happy to direct the food truck to where utility workers were in need of food.

    Wow.

    1. I’ve read the parable of the Good Samaritan many times. I must have missed the part where the Samaritan asked permission before assisting the waylaid traveler. If Mitch Timberlake had been mayor of Jericho in 30 AD, the Samaritan would have been hauled into court for practicing medicine, offering donkey rides and making travel accommodations without the necessary permits and licenses.

  5. OH MY GODDDDDDDDDD, what an asshole.

    1. Which asshole are you referring to? They mayor? The City Manager? The restaurateur who complained? The cops who kicked the food truck out? You need to be more specific, there’s so many asshole to choose from here.

      Although “all of the above” would also be fitting.

    2. Why are you introducing yourself?

  6. Green Cove Springs Mayor Mitch Timberlake

    …hates food trucks unless they pay the appropriate danegeld bribes purchasing incentives taxes after obeisance asking permission.

  7. “We don’t prohibit food trucks they are allowed 2 or 3 days every year.”

    Jesus.

  8. “The people who come into town, put up a business, have a building, employ numbers of people from the town deserve to make sure that someone doesn’t come in and set-up next door to them without the overhead costs they endured and run a business.”

    It’s amazing how every little tinpot dictator across the country has the exact same list of BS talking points memorized.

    1. Ain’t nobody better be buyin’ nothing of no internet in my town, we got businesses in buildings here.

    2. Why should I pay a dumb restaurateur for investing in a building when I can buy an equivalent product from a guy with a hand cart or a small truck at a lower price?

      1. Oh, I don’t know. Maybe the products aren’t all that equivalent.
        Maybe a warm place in the winter and a cool place in the summer and a dry place in the rain.
        Maybe a much larger menu.
        Maybe a staff to take your order, go get the food for you, keep your beverage filled.
        Maybe real plates and utensils instead of Styrofoam and thin plastic forks.
        From the point of view of an old arthritic man, these differences are worth a few bucks per meal.

        The point should be about YOU making the choice, not Mr. Mayor.

    3. per that thinking, as the oil burning railroad locomotives began to come in, the ones stil hacking cordwood to fire their boilers would have been justified outlawing the oilers. “We’ve got our capital investment here to protect, we can’t be letting in those who have not made those investments themselves”. Then, when the diesels first came in that directly converted the oil into motive power, the “old guard” would have gone apopleptic at the concept…. and the boilermakers and boiuler tenders would have taken up arms to “deal with the fraud”……

      See how stupid that thinking is?

  9. Green Cove Springs Mayor Mitch Timberlake this morning says he did not consider Roundtree’s gesture “a Good Samaritan situation.” Had the operators of the food truck come to city officials and asked for permission, Timberlake says, officials would have been happy to direct the food truck to where utility workers were in need of food.

    IOW he didn’t ask permission and follow orders first.

    With all of those challenges, it was remarkable city officials and police could maintain their focus on rules protecting unsuspecting hurricane victims from a hot meal on wheels. And quite a feat for a restaurateur to look past the devastating damage to track down city officials (city hall was closed; they operating from an emergency management shelter) and rat out one lousy food truck.

    My guess is the restaurateur in question is probably either friends with or related to the Mayor or perhaps the City Manager. I hope the people in Green Cove Springs can figure out which restaurant owner it was and boycott their business. And vote that fuck-stick of a Mayor out of office at the next election. Unfortunately, I believe City Manager is an appointed position (wouldn’t want the people to have a choice in who gets such an obviously powerful position, after all). Hopefully the next mayor will at least replace the shit head with a different shit head.

  10. What happened to the good old days when you could run a guy like that out of town on a rail.

    1. The rail was damaged in the storm, so they had to improvise.

    2. Crumbling infrastructure has made rails nearly impossible to come by these days.

  11. Towns are allowed to write their own rules, of course.

    How do you figure?

    Define “town” and “their own.”

  12. “Brandi Acres”

    Awesome 70s porn name.

    1. If you say so, it brings this joke to mind.

  13. When all you have is a hammer… you break stuff.

  14. Food trucks are licensed only a few dats a year. I’m sure the local restaraunts are treated equally under local laws…amiright?

  15. Remember, only the government knows best. Not those evil profit seeing companies.

    /Prog derp

  16. RE: Florida Town Booted Food Truck Offering Meals to Hurricane Survivors After Nearby Restaurant Complained
    Mayor says the town doesn’t ban food trucks, but only allows them on certain days. And that’s one rule that can’t bend even in the wake of a major hurricane.

    The city only allows food trucks to operate on the sixth Saturday of every month.
    But, hey, at least that’s something.

  17. And of course, the Mayor will be shocked, shocked, to find this little item showing up in the next election campaign.

  18. Fuck off slavers

  19. As a resident of Sarasota, Florida, it’s devastating to see the chaos that has ensued in different parts of the state following the Hurricane. It’s sad to see that this act of kindness was ruined by monetary motives.

  20. Two bit wannabe Nazis want to control everything.

  21. So, the food truck operator set up shop in the reserved parking spaces of a closed restaurant to sell people food. An entirely plausible explanation is that the restaurant owner didn’t want the truck on his lot. Do libertarians generally suspend the whole property rights thing in the event of a hurricane?

    Also, if I hear a fight happening in the alley and, upon arriving, find someone bleeding and semi-conscious and only take his wallet, I technically didn’t violate the NAP right? I mean the other guys actually did the beating and I just lightened this guy’s burden by the weight of his wallet.

    Reason’s lopsided portrayal is kinda disingenuous.

    1. The governments JOB is NOT to limit the freedom of the people

      No rights were being violated

      THE GOVERNMENT ACTED AS A MOB ENFORCER TO PROTECT THEIR “INCOME”

      So the real question then becomes

      DOES THE GOV HAVE THE RIGHT TO DEMAND PAYMENT TO OPERATE A BUSINESS

      NO, THEY SHOULD NOT

      1. The governments JOB is NOT to limit the freedom of the people

        No rights were being violated

        Bullshit, look at the pics and read the article. The guy parked in the reserved spaces of a local restaurant. If you vacated your home or business because of a natural disaster and returned to find a food truck operating out of the driveway or parking lot, you would be within your rights to contact the police, nor would they be wrong in running the truck off the property. Obviously, there are far more preferable solutions, but everybody involved seems to have foregone those ideas.

        This guy wasn’t a good Samaritan helping the poor and needy for nothing, or merely operating at cost. What he did is rather blatantly covered between loitering, soliciting, and trespassing and doesn’t particularly matter what or where on private property he did it. The mayor was an asshole and actually had a few decent reasons to do what he did. The fact that he chose ‘FYTW’ doesn’t make Roundtree pure as snow or even very libertarian.

        Also, once again, Reason blindly minimally researches the story and blindly sides with the internet tattle mob on an exceedingly ‘local’ story.

    2. Agree. However, they’d didn’t just ask him to move from the parking lot because he was trespassing.

      They ran him out of town because he hadn’t obtained proper permission from the city government, and further, no such permission would ever be forthcoming.

      “Green Cove Springs Mayor Mitch Timberlake this morning says he did not consider Roundtree’s gesture “a Good Samaritan situation.” Had the operators of the food truck come to city officials and asked for permission, Timberlake says, officials would have been happy to direct the food truck to where utility workers were in need of food. “That didn’t happen,” he said.

  22. PLENTY OF STRAWS

    BUT ALL CAMELS BACKS STILL

    IN SHAPE

  23. THE REAL QUESTION IS:

    Does the government have the right to demand that companies pay a fee to operate a business?

    of course not

    you choose to open a restaurant

    you choose to open a mobile restaurant

    and so on

    the government merely got people use to the extortion so now most just go along with it

  24. This is pretty sad and one-sided. Does the restaurant owner have a right to earn a living and get back on his/her feet after a major storm? What about employees at the restaurant who maybe get sent home early without pay because the lunch/dinner crowd got a free meal elsewhere? Also, it’s nice to attribute good Samaritanism to the food truck, but really there’s a business angle in it for them too…free advertising…

    This hyperventilated and one-sided report got only ONE THING really right in its outrage: that the government official said it’s okay to be a good Samaritan if you get the government’s permission first. That’s just nuts.

    HOWEVER, the overwrought reporting leaves out some pretty important details by never actually determining the truth of whether a fixed-location restaurant complained, who it was, and whether they might have ALSO had a legitimate reason to expect a level playing field after a natural disaster. You make whoever it was sound like the people selling bottled water for $15, when maybe they were just hoping to pay their rent today.

  25. “This is a perfect example of how overblown regulations burden entrepreneurs.”
    I’m pretty sure it’s a perfect example of how businesses are businesses worst enemies.

  26. My question is whether they’re going to ticket Irma. I’m sure she broke a few rules.

  27. The mayor, the city council, and the police are all a bunch of ass-wipes.

  28. the government does not like competition

  29. This reminds me of an argument a famous military lawyer said to a famous Marine lieutenant.

    Lt. Kendrick: Lance Corporal Dawson was given a below average rating because he had committed a crime.

    Lawyer Kaffee: A crime? What crime did he commit?
    Lt. Kendrick? Dawson brought a hungry guyou some food……what crime did he commit?

    Lt. Kendrick: He disobeyed an order!

    Lawyer Kaffee: And because he did, because he exercised his own set of values, because he made a decision about the welfare of a Marine that was in conflict with yours, he was punished. Is that right?

    Lt. Kendrick: Lance Corporal Dawson disobeyed an order!

    Lawyer Kaffee: Yeah,it wasn’t a real order, was it? After all, it’s peace time. He wasn’t being asked to secure a hill or advance on a beach head. I mean, surely a Marine of Dawson’s intelligence can be trusted to determine, on his own, which are really important orders and which are might, say, be morally questionable? Lt. Kendrick? Can he? Can Dawson determine on his own which orders he’s going to follow?

    Lt. Kendrick: No, he cannot!

  30. The mayor says he doesn’t see his city’s policies as protectionist towards restaurants and then goes on to explain how the policy is nothing but protectionism for restaurants..

  31. I went to High School in Green Cove Springs.

    This saddens me, but it doesn’t surprise me.

  32. My question is whether they’re going to ticket Irma. I’m sure she broke a few rules.

    Yoga Burn

  33. It seems that the state should have some sort of disaster-area contingency that allows the governor or someone high up to allow pre-vetted businesses like food trucks or the “vulture” bottled-water sellers with a temporary permission order. Otherwise, who knows what type of stuff might get sold.

  34. People should learn to be a little more giving in times of need. We help our town when a disaster like that happens to us. It will come back to you 10 fold. https://www.thetreefellerofpinellas.com/

  35. Interesting .. I helped out by changing out pool screens that got blown out from the wind.

    http://rescreeningsarasota.com/index.html

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