New York

State Troopers Wrote 12,000+ More Tickets in NYC So Far This Year Than All of Last Year

Gov. Andrew Cuomo accused of "using law enforcement to do political machinations."

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Phil's 1stPix via Foter.com / CC BY-NC-SA

State troopers posted in New York City have written nearly 800 percent more tickets this year than they did in all of 2016, according to The New York Post; state troopers had written just 4 tickets in 2015 and none in 2014. State troopers also made nearly 50 percent more arrests this year than in all of last year, with 63 people arrested so far—there were none in 2015.

New York's governor, Democrat Andrew Cuomo, sent 150 state troopers into New York City in December, with The Post reporting that the deployment had two goals: "to haul in revenue to state coffers, and rankle ­rival Mayor de Blasio, ­according to observers."

The Post estimates that the state troopers have raised more than $3 million from writing tickets in the city—speeding tickets are $203, with $88 going to the state, while tickets for using a cellphone while driving are $288.

The governor's office insists the extra deployment of troopers in New York City was because of "worldwide terror threats that targeted infrastructure and to catch scofflaws when the state moved to congestion alleviating cashless tolling," as Richard Azzopardi, a spokesperson for the governor, told The Post. A state police spokesperson, meanwhile, said that the "simple answer to why there are more tickets is we weren't on bridges and tunnels and now we are."

A criminology professor, Eugene O'Donnell, pointed out to The Post that "putting primarily rural and traffic-oriented.?.?. troopers into an urban environment should be done with the greatest care and collaboration" and not for "political point scoring," likening Cuomo's actions, "using law enforcement to do political machinations," to those of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie (R).

Azzopardi insisted to The Post that O'Donnell, who he called"a so-called expert," didn't know "the first thing about state police training because there are state troopers in other cities in New York. New York City has 8 million residents. The next largest city in New York is Buffalo, with a population of 261,130. Azzopardi's suggestion that policing in both cities would involve the same kind of training is troubling.

h/t Chad

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  1. WHAT?

    Progressive states/cities try to balance their books for programs favored by the elites by fucking over the poor?

    GET THE FUCK OUTTA TOWN!!!

    I eagerly await the time when minorities realize that the Left really only loves lily-white elites and DEEPLY despises to poor of whatever hue their skin may be.

    1. I don’t see what this has to do with “the poor” or “minorities”?

      1. Apparently the Republican believes that everyone in NYC is poor and non-white.

      2. Who do you think has to drive longer distances to make a living in NYC?

        Hint: not the rich.

        That parking tickets disproportionately impact the poor and minorities is not news.

        1. Who do you think has to drive longer distances to make a living in NYC?

          I can assure you that the city fucks everyone over pretty much equally.

          Sometimes it’s just as simple as following the money.

    2. Guys, clearly people in New York are so stressed out from Trump being president, that they have started driving poorly and are getting more tickets.

  2. I spent a total of 26 years in the cities of Buffalo and Rochester and don’t recall ever seeing a state trooper. It is known that they hang out on the Thruway – which does not pass through either city – and in rural areas as mentioned.

    Spokesperson for the governor Richard Azzopardi is full of it.

  3. “…while tickets for using a cellphone while driving are $288.
    I always found the cell phone laws funny. The political rally of the law was to reduce distracted driving.Of course, many jurisdictions already have laws prohibiting distracted driving.

    Then I see police officers with laptops in their police cars that they access while driving. Police use cell phones and of course radios while driving.

    Another reason not to live in these fascist jurisdictions that create so many laws.

  4. Remind me again how governments differ from organized crime?

    1. Scale and p.r.

    2. Shouldn’t you attempt to differentiate between legitimate and illegitimate governments? Or are all governments illegitimate in your worldview? In other words, are you an anarchist?

    3. Organized crime knows how to dress with style.

    4. Organized crime is actually organized.

    5. Omerta?

  5. The Post reporting that the deployment had two goals: “to haul in revenue to state coffers, and rankle ?rival Mayor de Blasio, ?according to observers.”

    I guess I just don’t get politics. I see the rankle part, but how does pissing off 8 million NYC residents help the governor in a state with 20 million residents?

    1. It helps to understand that upstate NYers really dislike NYC. Fucking over NYC is likely to win him even more votes upstate – and he’ll get all the votes in NYC either way.

      1. But the reason Upstate New Yorkers do not like NYC is because NYC keep putting poltroons like the Cuomos over them.

        1. It’s Cuomos all the way down.

    2. Did Cuomo ever try closing for construction a key bridge into the city? Because I hear that works, too.

    3. Because people are idiots and will simply blame the closest authority figure for their troubles – which in this case is the mayor.

      1. Its the same reason rioters upset about police action tear up their own neighborhoods – that’s what’s in reach.

  6. Well at least they were semi-honest about how most of law enforcement exists mostly to raise revenue. That’s a start, I guess.

  7. The governor’s office insists the extra deployment of troopers in New York City was because of “worldwide terror threats that targeted infrastructure and to catch scofflaws when the state moved to congestion alleviating cashless tolling…”

    One of those two things is closer to the truth than the other.

  8. New York’s governor, Democrat Andrew Cuomo, sent 150 state troopers into New York City in December, with The Post reporting that the deployment had two goals: “to haul in revenue to state coffers, and rankle ?rival Mayor de Blasio, ?according to observers.”

    Wouldn’t it be so much nicer is every police force was limited to a specific jurisdiction and there was no overlap of authority between jurisdictions.

    Then State Police would be limited to state government facilities and serving as a state-wide pool augment pool to be used when called up (say a murder in an otherwise quiet rural area where the local cops don’t have any experience running a murder investigation)?

    NYC cops would be limited to the confines of NYC too. College cops could stop patrolling off-campus.

    1. Limiting their jurisdiction would stop them from hiding the true cost of policing and force each agency to increase or decrease its numbers to match its responsibilities.

      If an outside agency has to regularly come into another agency’s primary jurisdiction, it’s time to question if that agency is being subsidized by the outside agency(ies).

      In Nevada, city police, county sheriffs, NHP, and maybe one or two others have statewide jurisdiction in that a cop from Las Vegas can enforce the law in Henderson, Reno, Sparks, on the freeway, etc., if they see a crime being committed.
      BUT, police departments for the county school district, community college, university system, gaming control, city marshals, railroad, park police etc. are indeed limited to specific areas and essentially have no jurisdiction outside of them unless there is a mutual aid agreement in place. They also have to yield primary jurisdiction to the city/county for various high level crimes.

      This came up when the Clark County School District Police Department was helping other agencies run speed traps on Boulder Highway nowhere near any schools or other district property.
      While CCSDPD is doing speed traps, who’s patrolling school property? Sure, LV Metro, HPD, NLVPD, etc., will respond to any calls from a school, but they’re not going to be patrolling parking lots and other district property, since that is the primary responsibility of CCSDPD.

      1. For maybe 7 or 8 months, starting in August 2009, LVMPD was posting motorcycles and cruisers up and down I-15 doing radar traps. In the 9 years that I had lived here and regularly commuted on the freeway, I’d never seen this. Until then, NHP was the only agency I ever saw parked on the side of the road running radar.

        It made me wonder where NHP was during all of this, and what was happening in the areas that would have been patrolled by the LVMPD units were now all over the freeway. Tellingly, I didn’t see LVMPD units working crashes on the side of the freeway, nor did I see NHP doing local traffic enforcement or responding to crashes on city streets.
        It was also bizarre since LVMPD was claiming that they were drastically understaffed and were pushing yet another sales tax increase to hire more officers.

        As the economy improved, sales tax revenue went up, and they got their increase, LVMPD stopped doing this, and I’ve yet to see them doing this in the 6 years since.

  9. That sounds like a lot of tickets, but let’s see. 12000 tickets, 150 troopers thats 80 tickets each in say 4 months or 20 tickets a month per trooper. Ifr troopers work 20 days a month troopers are only writing one ticket a day….. WOW

    1. In addition to whatever the other 39,000 NYPD officers did.

  10. They could write 12,000 tickets every morning and never leave the BQE.

  11. RE: State Troopers Wrote 12,000+ More Tickets in NYC So Far This Year Than All of Last Year
    Gov. Andrew Cuomo accused of “using law enforcement to do political machinations.”

    1. Governor Cuomo using law enforcement to do political machinations? Who would’ve thought that? This must be a first in world history.
    2. State troopers in NY wrote only 12,000 tickets in NYC?
    That’s all?
    C’mon officers, you can do better than that. There are millions of people living in NYC, so suck it up, and start writing more ticket. Otherwise there will be some NY state employees that will not be able to afford their third vacation home in the Bahamas.
    3. You troopers have quotas. If you want your bonus, then start writing more citations. Otherwise forget those first class tickets for your European vacations.
    You troopers have been warned.

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