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"I have such a deeper appreciation for the punishment that black people received from their government for so long and the crass politics that perpetuated it."

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On Friday, I interviewed Bill Steigerwald, author of the brilliant new book, 30 Days a Black Man, an account of a white journalist's travels through the Jim Crow South in the 1940s while passing as African American (a dozen-plus years before Black Like Me).

A snippet from our conversation:

Steigerwald: [When you do historical research], you learn that nothing is new, everything was worse, and what you thought was simple or true was not. When you look back at '48 and you see this stuff, and Ray Sprigle's reporting, he was a reporter. When he heard guys in Atlanta say, "Oh, Atlanta's a great city for black people. Nothing ever happens here." Well, he went down the courthouse and dug up some records and he came up with three cases in the last two years where young black males, this sounds a little familiar, were shot dead by cops or trolley conductors who were armed at the time and were able to shoot anybody. They were shot dead and the defense was always, "Oh, I thought he was reaching for a gun or something. I shot him dead," and they all got off. I mean, you could take those examples and put them in the paper today and people would say, "Well, yeah."…

I have such a deeper appreciation for the punishment that black people received from their government for so long and the crass politics that perpetuated it.

Listen and read more here.

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  1. Several dozen torch-wielding protesters gathered in Charlottesville’s Lee Park just after 9 p.m. Saturday, chanting “You will not replace us,” “Russia is our friend” and “Blood and soil.”

    After about 10 minutes, Charlottesville police arrived at the scene following an altercation between protesters. The crowd quickly dispersed with no further incidents, according to police.

    In April, Charlottesville City Council voted to sell the statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that stands in the park, but a judge earlier this month issued an injunction that prevents the city from doing so for six months.

    http://www.dailyprogress.com/n…..f5d38.html

    1. From your link, turd:
      “Police were unable to confirm exactly who or what groups were at Lee and Jackson parks on Saturday night.”
      Did you have a point? Or just your normal, random idiocy?

      1. “Police were unable to confirm exactly who or what groups were at Lee and Jackson parks on Saturday night.”

        This does not mean that the police did not know who they were.

        1. ernieyeball|5.14.17 @ 8:52PM|#
          “This does not mean that the police did not know who they were.”

          Did you have a point?

      2. I’ll take a swing at this…

        Richard Spencer, a University of Virginia graduate and a white nationalist who popularized the term “alt-right,”

        Trumps fault.

        1. Or Bush’s fault; the lefties are in a quandrum.

    2. This isn’t really newsworthy. It becomes newsworthy that the Mayor decided this sort of protest was unacceptable and called it “horrific.”

      Police reported that there were no injuries, no property damage, and that the crowd dispersed when asked and confronted by additional police units arriving on site. Guys, this was pure free speech without intimidation or bloodshed, and an elected official decided it was wrong because he disagrees with the opinions of the protestors. THAT’S the scary thing.

    3. Um, ok, that’s nice.

  2. When you look back at ’48 and you see this stuff,

    and clearly nothing has changed in Atlanta since then. The city has always had black mayors and several black City Council members. It’s almost as if the politics changed; if the behavior that is troublesome is still being perpetuated, you may want to consider a different group of suspects.

  3. And for an encore, Gillespie will lead us in a chorus of “If I Had A Hammer”.

  4. just as Benjamin responded I’m startled that a mother can make $9059 in one month on the internet . Get the facts


    ……………. http://www.Prowage20.com

  5. just as Benjamin responded I’m startled that a mother can make $9059 in one month on the internet . Get the facts


    ……………. http://www.Prowage20.com

  6. I have such a deeper appreciation for the punishment that black people received from their government for so long and the crass politics that perpetuated Kodi For Windows.

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