Occupational Licensing

D.C. Implements Oppressive Licensing for Child Care Workers at Behest of Early Education Advocates

Don't have at least an associate's degree? Step away from the finger paints, you monster.

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Pre-school
Monkey Business Images / Dreamstime.com

Scientists say that higher education for pre-school child-care workers is a good idea. So of course D.C. is going to make it mandatory that child-care workers get associate's degrees and completely screw over an entire class of lower-skilled workers.

Indeed, the argument is literally that lower-skilled workers shouldn't be caring for children because that might mean that their precious, developing brains are not getting stimulated as much as they could be. But rather than passing that information along to parents to decide how much to evaluate the education of their child-care professionals as a priority, D.C. has decided to mandate more training.

The consequences are, of course, going to be absolutely awful for some people who are unable to get what the city's demanding. From The Washington Post:

[F]or many child-care workers, who are often hired with little more than a high school diploma, returning to school is a difficult, expensive proposition with questionable reward.

Many already have more training than comparably paid jobs such as parking lot attendants, hotel clerks, and fast food workers. And unlike most professional fields, prospects are slim that a degree would bring a significantly higher income: a bachelor's degree in early childhood education yields the lowest life-time earnings of any major.

Center directors have few resources to tap if they want to reward their better-educated employees. Many parents in the District are maxed out, paying among the highest annual tuitions nationally at $1800 a month. And government subsidies that help fund care for children from lower income families fall well below market rate.

In the end, early child-care teachers that go on to earn diplomas often leave their jobs to work in public schools, where they can earn substantially more.

One child-care center operator said that only two of her 16 employees have made it to associate's degrees thus far, and one had quit because she simply couldn't go back to school.

The news story doesn't engage in the question of why parents can't decide for themselves how important it is for their child-care workers to have advanced degrees. Perhaps that's because early education advocates might not like the answers, once the realities of the likely cost increases get factored in.

There's instead a heavy emphasis in the story on the mechanisms by which these poor workers might get subsidies or assistance to get the education they need to keep their livelihoods. There's also no interest in exploring the increased attention to the major problems for the poor that are a direct result from occupational licensing programs. No doubt the same people who promote such programs would, for example, see Mississippi's push to decrease the power of regulatory licensing programs as proof of how backward that southern state is.

To be sure, this D.C. law is a jobs program—it's a jobs program for people who work in the field of post-secondary education itself. Nothing like using a regulatory mandate to create a demand for your educational services that might not exist otherwise. The story makes it abundantly clear that advocates for increased education of child-care workers—who, wouldn't you know it, work in the field of education—want to spread this program well beyond D.C.'s borders.

Oh, incidentally, President Donald Trump and his daughter, Ivanka, have been proposing a massive child-care subsidy that would manifest via deductibles. That would perhaps help the wealthier D.C. residents cover increasing costs that would most certainly follow once child-care workers have advanced degrees.

But as has been noted, such a subsidy plan would not do much for lower-income families. And so not only would poorer families be even less able to afford child care, they're also going to be locked out of jobs within the industry itself. Good work there, D.C.

By the way, as a useful reminder, science also says many of America's early education programs are crap due to wasteful spending with poor oversight.

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  1. Since a degree from most American colleges now basically retards you to the intellect of a 5 year old, perhaps they are onto something.

    Kindred spirits and all.

  2. “The news story doesn’t engage in the question of why parents can’t decide for themselves how important it is for their child-care workers to have advanced degrees.”
    Because parents cannot possibly know what is best for their own children.
    Only liberal progressive meddlers are qualified to determine who can baby sit for pay. After all, these people are soon to be paid $15.00 and hour, surely that fortune will allow them to get a useless degree! Not to mention the necessity of taking on student debt, so those same meddling busybodies can wail and whine about how terrible it is all those minimum wage workers have so much debt!

    1. In DC, most are already paid more than $15/hr. The person I know who works in DC childcare makes more than that. Not much more, but a little bit.

  3. I don’t even think you should need a high school diploma to be a professional child-care worker. Who the fuck thought this was a good idea? I fully support never giving D.C. statehood.

    1. I don’t even think you should need a high school diploma to be a professional child-care worker.

      Technically, you don’t.

      Just if you want be part of an organization that takes care of large numbers of kids.

      On a completely unrelated note:
      so not only would poorer families be even less able to afford child care, they’re also going to be locked out of jobs within the industry itself.

      I fully expect Shikha Dalmia to cite the fact that immigrants are locked out of these jobs far less and/or do them for far less money than native-born Americans as proof of immigrants’ superiority and/or natives’ laziness.

  4. Shackford, you’re a shoe-in whenever they start issuing alt-text licenses.

    1. Would’ve made more sense if the photo were much older.

  5. My wife (and I) ran a home daycare last year. It was an excellent way to earn supplemental income while staying home with the kids and simultaneously pursuing her master’s degree. The licensing requirements and regulations, even in our “backward red state”, were absolutely ridiculous. Fortunately, she got her Master’s in Secondary Education, a field that’s completely free of pointless licensing requirements and nonsensical regulations.

  6. I’m sure the Dems there would still tell you they’re truly selfless advocates for the poor. That’s why they need their benevolent protection.

  7. Dreamstime.com
    Scientists say that higher education for pre-school child-care workers is a good idea.

    Are you really going to argue with science you dumb, backwards hick?

  8. D.C. Implements Oppressive Licensing for Child Care Workers at Behest of Early Education Advocates Vested Interests

  9. President Donald Trump and his daughter, Ivanka, have been proposing a massive child-care subsidy that would manifest via deductibles. That would perhaps help the wealthier D.C. residents cover increasing costs that would most certainly follow once child-care workers have advanced degrees.

    But as has been noted, such a subsidy plan would not do much for lower-income families.

    Isn’t reducing taxes for some payers better than increasing spending?

  10. “In the end, early child-care teachers that go on to earn diplomas often leave their jobs to work in public schools, where they can earn substantially more.”

    After that line and seeing this requirement I just have the eerie feeling this is being pushed by the NEA as a way to boost union rolls.

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  12. It’s just to rake in some dough. They don’t give a shit about enforcing any rules. I know someone who works in DC childcare and they had to do the license, which costs a bit, and to be in compliance they had to drug test, which costs a bit more. Everyone at the center was drug tested and almost half the people there came up positive for pot and a couple for coke. Anyone get fired or disciplined? Hell no. The licensing agency doesn’t care in the slightest what the results of the tests are. It just wants to make sure the testing was done and paid for.

  13. Fire up the chipper!

  14. The news story doesn’t engage in the question of why parents can’t decide for themselves how important it is for their child-care workers to have advanced degrees.

    if parents are the ones who “decide for themselves” whether their child-care workers have advanced degrees, does that mean parents should also be the ones who decide whether their kids’ elementary or high school teachers have degrees, advanced or otherwise?

    After all, if push comes to shove school teachers are basically just child-care workers too.

  15. Child care workers are those people that deserve particular respect! I don’t know why but people tend to underestimate the role of the people, who is really useful for society! Actually, human’s mentality works a strange way. We tend to judge things before even trying them in practise! Recently, I’ve recommended certified writing services UK to my friend, who experiences difficulties with college papers writing. He was so furious and said that all people, who write essays online, are fraudsters! You know, I apply to essay writers regularly and had never faced the fraudsters! So, I think that people must be patient to others!

  16. “I presume only on this, but its seems like there’s not nearly the stigma as it is for men.” For one, there are far, far less female sex offenders, and for another, most Click Essay of their victims, as they said, would be teens and not young children “

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