Hate crimes

Kentucky Becomes Second State to Add Police to Hate Crimes Law

Louisiana already illustrating potential for abuse.

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Gov. Matt Bevin
Jeff Malet Photography/Newscom

This week Republican Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin signed into law House Bill 14, which adds law enforcement and emergency responders to the state's hate crimes law.

Technically, this is supposed to mean that if somebody intentionally targets a person for a crime because they're police officers, he or she may face enhanced sentences for a conviction. That's how hate crime laws are used in cases when a criminal targets somebody on the basis of race, sexual orientation, religion, and other protected categories.

But Louisiana has already passed a law just like this one, part of a whole "Blue Lives Matter" movement, and what we've seen so far is a push by law enforcement to classify any attempt to resist them as a hate crime. It's not being used to add punishment for those who target the police, because to the extent that police get targeted for attacks or ambushes, these are extreme, high-profile outliers.

What really happens when police have attempted to apply the law in Louisiana, it's because people say nasty things to police while resisting arrest. As C.J. Ciaramella previously noted, one police chief in Louisiana has said this is how he believes this law is supposed to function. He flat out said that people who resist arrest could face enhanced charges under the state's hate crime laws.

Here's what I wrote about police attempting to use hate crime laws to punish resistance or insults against them in New Orleans:

As somebody who has read many, many, many reports of anti-gay assaults and violence over the years, I just want to point out that while it probably looks clear to everybody outside the police that this wasn't a hate crime (again, regardless of a position on hate crime laws), what do people consider when evaluating the credibility of hate crime claims against other minorities? Things like whether the person assaulting a gay person or other minority shouted bigoted slurs, just like Delatoba did here. That is one of the factors used to decide that a crime is motivated by hate, and many supporters of hate crime laws get very, very upset when police don't immediately accept that hate speech as evidence that a hate crime occurred. But since we don't have the ability to read minds, what hate crime enhancements often actually do is add additional punishment based on what people say or express while committing a crime.

But this paranoia-fueled backlash to the "Black Lives Matter" movement seems likely to spread. President Donald Trump has put out an executive order calling for research into the possibility of new laws that could possibly add additional federal penalties against those who target police. Or those who get accused of targeting the police, anyway.

Should we be wondering which state will be the first to add law enforcement to their public accommodation laws, making it a crime for a business to refuse them service?

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  1. Being a police officer is not a choice!

      1. Lol. Transracial disorder.

    1. But being a Muslim or a Jew or a Christian is…

  2. eventually every crime will be a hate crime, so the designation will be irrelevant.

    “Hate” Crime – should be no surprise that the people who make decisions on emotion and reject logic or reason, would pass laws based on emotion and not logic or reason

  3. This was inevitable. There should be no “protected” categories of human beings. Murdering somebody is murdering somebody. If only this would open the eyes of liberals who favor such laws. Chances of hate crime laws ever going away? Zero.

    1. Yeah, it seems that the concept of equality is dead and in it’s place we have a sliding scale of justice based on a variety of frankly unknowable factors about a person.

      In other words, the rule of law is dead. Long live the rule of man.

    2. Yup. Nobody who “hates” minorities that much could win an election in the 21st century. Progress! History being cyclical is too trite and hopeless (and oddly similar to Nietzsche’s eternal recurrence thing, for whatever that’s worth) for me, but some people seem absolutely determined to prove it true.

  4. I know this is fucked up, but I’m glad. I hope that hate crime laws become so abused that the left finally abandons them and starts arguing against them with principle.

    And Reason not fixing their commenting is bordering on a hate crime.

  5. So just being a cop is a hate crime now? Seems a little extreme, but it’s better than the status quo.

  6. God damn it, Kentucky. Just when I thought you were getting your shit together.

  7. Good law doesn’t come from bad law. Pain and persecution comes from bad law. If sufficient, this pain and persecution might transform into social action. I despair of that in this case in the same way as the civil forfeiture laws have victimized innocent civilians at the hands of mendacious police practices without meaningful backlash. Not enough social will to organize against it. WE MUST STOP THESE LAWS BEFORE THEY BECOME LAW! Laws that “protect” authority are bad for liberty.

  8. How long till they make politicians and government employees into a protected class?

    1. They already are if you look at criminal code. Any crime to a government employee is always a higher sentence.

      http://tinyurl.com/ke7mony

      Offense based on status of victim. A person commits aggravated battery when, in committing a battery, other than by discharge of a firearm, he or she knows the individual battered to be any of the following:
      (1) A person 60 years of age or older.
      (2) A person who is pregnant or has a physical

      disability.
      (3) A teacher or school employee upon school grounds

      or grounds adjacent to a school or in any part of a building used for school purposes.
      (4) A peace officer, community policing volunteer,

      fireman, private security officer, correctional institution employee, or Department of Human Services employee supervising or controlling sexually dangerous persons or sexually violent persons:
      (i) performing his or her official duties;
      (ii) battered to prevent performance of his or

      her official duties; or
      (iii) battered in retaliation for performing his

      or her official duties.
      (5) A judge, emergency management worker, emergency

      1. medical services personnel, or utility worker:
        (i) performing his or her official duties;
        (ii) battered to prevent performance of his or

        her official duties; or
        (iii) battered in retaliation for performing his

        or her official duties.
        (6) An officer or employee of the State of Illinois,

        a unit of local government, or a school district, while performing his or her official duties.
        (7) A transit employee performing his or her official

        duties, or a transit passenger.
        (8) A taxi driver on duty.
        (9) A merchant who detains the person for an alleged

        commission of retail theft under Section 16-26 of this Code and the person without legal justification by any means causes bodily harm to the merchant.
        (10) A person authorized to serve process under

        Section 2-202 of the Code of Civil Procedure or a special process server appointed by the circuit court while that individual is in the performance of his or her duties as a process server.
        (11) A nurse while in the performance of his or her

        duties as a nurse.

      2. medical services personnel, or utility worker:
        (i) performing his or her official duties;
        (ii) battered to prevent performance of his or

        her official duties; or
        (iii) battered in retaliation for performing his

        or her official duties.
        (6) An officer or employee of the State of Illinois,

        a unit of local government, or a school district, while performing his or her official duties.
        (7) A transit employee performing his or her official

        duties, or a transit passenger.
        (8) A taxi driver on duty.
        (9) A merchant who detains the person for an alleged

        commission of retail theft under Section 16-26 of this Code and the person without legal justification by any means causes bodily harm to the merchant.
        (10) A person authorized to serve process under

        Section 2-202 of the Code of Civil Procedure or a special process server appointed by the circuit court while that individual is in the performance of his or her duties as a process server.
        (11) A nurse while in the performance of his or her

        duties as a nurse.

    2. They already are if you look at criminal code. Any crime to a government employee is always a higher sentence.

      http://tinyurl.com/ke7mony

      Offense based on status of victim. A person commits aggravated battery when, in committing a battery, other than by discharge of a firearm, he or she knows the individual battered to be any of the following:
      (1) A person 60 years of age or older.
      (2) A person who is pregnant or has a physical

      disability.
      (3) A teacher or school employee upon school grounds

      or grounds adjacent to a school or in any part of a building used for school purposes.
      (4) A peace officer, community policing volunteer,

      fireman, private security officer, correctional institution employee, or Department of Human Services employee supervising or controlling sexually dangerous persons or sexually violent persons:
      (i) performing his or her official duties;
      (ii) battered to prevent performance of his or

      her official duties; or
      (iii) battered in retaliation for performing his

      or her official duties.
      (5) A judge, emergency management worker, emergency

    3. They already are if you look at criminal code. Any crime to a government employee is always a higher sentence.

      http://tinyurl.com/ke7mony

      Offense based on status of victim. A person commits aggravated battery when, in committing a battery, other than by discharge of a firearm, he or she knows the individual battered to be any of the following:
      (1) A person 60 years of age or older.
      (2) A person who is pregnant or has a physical

      disability.
      (3) A teacher or school employee upon school grounds

      or grounds adjacent to a school or in any part of a building used for school purposes.
      (4) A peace officer, community policing volunteer,

      fireman, private security officer, correctional institution employee, or Department of Human Services employee supervising or controlling sexually dangerous persons or sexually violent persons:
      (i) performing his or her official duties;
      (ii) battered to prevent performance of his or

      her official duties; or
      (iii) battered in retaliation for performing his

      or her official duties.
      (5) A judge, emergency management worker, emergency

    4. FUCK POST!!!! tried 12 times.!!!!!

  9. @Chip

    They already are if you look at criminal code. Any crime to a government employee is always a higher sentence.

    http://tinyurl.com/ke7mony

    Offense based on status of victim. A person commits aggravated battery when, in committing a battery, other than by discharge of a firearm, he or she knows the individual battered to be any of the following:
    (1) A person 60 years of age or older.
    (2) A person who is pregnant or has a physical

    disability.
    (3) A teacher or school employee upon school grounds

    or grounds adjacent to a school or in any part of a building used for school purposes.
    (4) A peace officer, community policing volunteer,

    fireman, private security officer, correctional institution employee, or Department of Human Services employee supervising or controlling sexually dangerous persons or sexually violent persons:
    (i) performing his or her official duties;
    (ii) battered to prevent performance of his or

    her official duties; or
    (iii) battered in retaliation for performing his

    or her official duties.
    (5) A judge, emergency management worker, emergency

  10. They already are if you look at criminal code. Any crime to a government employee is always a higher sentence.

    http://tinyurl.com/ke7mony

    Offense based on status of victim. A person commits aggravated battery when, in committing a battery, other than by discharge of a firearm, he or she knows the individual battered to be any of the following:
    (1) A person 60 years of age or older.
    (2) A person who is pregnant or has a physical

    disability.
    (3) A teacher or school employee upon school grounds

    or grounds adjacent to a school or in any part of a building used for school purposes.
    (4) A peace officer, community policing volunteer,

    fireman, private security officer, correctional institution employee, or Department of Human Services employee supervising or controlling sexually dangerous persons or sexually violent persons:
    (i) performing his or her official duties;
    (ii) battered to prevent performance of his or

    her official duties; or
    (iii) battered in retaliation for performing his

    or her official duties.
    (5) A judge, emergency management worker, emergency

  11. jesus fuck you reason!!!!

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