National School Choice Week

Teen Throws Paper Airplane in Class. He Was Arrested and Faces 30 Days in Jail.

Police don't belong in schools.

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Airplane
Elena Elisseeva / Dreamstime

Georgetown County, South Carolina, sheriff's deputies arrested a 17-year-old for throwing a paper airplane at a teacher. The teen was charged with third degree assault and battery, and faces 30 days in jail.

It's not quite as crazy as it sounds. The paper airplane struck the teacher, Edward McIver, in the eye. McIver had recently had eye surgery, according to the South Strand News.

What's more, the teen—David Michael Elliott—had a record of misbehavior in the classroom. When confronted, he admitted he threw the airplane at McIver, and defended himself by saying that he had meant to hit McIver in the head, rather than the eye. He offered no further justification for the misdeed.

Eye surgery hurts—I know, I've had it—and taking a paper airplane in the eye sounds pretty awful. This kid seems like he has a real problem, and some kind of harsh disciplinary measure would have been well justified.

But now the matter is out the school's hands. That's because Andrews High School employs a school resource officer (SRO) to mete out justice.

The SRO, Deputy Paul Glover, met with Elliott, who admitted wrongdoing. That's a big problem. Was Elliott read his rights? Did he know that he should remain silent and ask for a lawyer?

When asked if she felt Elliott's arrest was warranted, AHS Principal Michelle Greene said she thought the incident did constitute an assault, but added deputies make the ultimate determination as to whether criminal charges are filed.

"That's the law enforcement side," Greene said. "That is a violation of school policy, but if law enforcement … deem it necessary to get a warrant for it, then that's what happens. The school does not interfere with law enforcement business, and they don't interfere with ours."

Maybe the school doesn't interfere with law enforcement, but it introduced law enforcement into the situation in the first place, by employing an SRO.

As Tyler Kotesky and I explained in a feature story from the March issue of Reason, schools' increasing reliance on the police has profound negative consequences for kids. Disciplinary matters that should be handled by principals, teachers, and counsellors are instead left in the hands of cops, who have at their disposal a much harsher set of corrective measures.

You might think a kid who deliberately chucked something at a teacher deserves a harsh punishment, and I would agree. But kids who do that sort of thing clearly have behavioral issues—issues that won't be sorted out, and will likely be made worse, if they are convicted of a crime and sentenced to jail time. Jail does not build character: spending time there makes it much less likely that a teenager will actually finish high school, attend college, and become a productive member of society.

Schools should not involve cops in routine disciplinary matters, because doing so escalates the dispute and decreases the likelihood that the punishment will be logical. But keeping cops out of the business of disciplining teens is impossible unless we keep them out of schools, period.

Another tool for restoring a modicum of fairness to school discipline is school choice. Because most school resource officers are stationed in traditional public schools, reforms like voucher programs and expanding charter schools are great ways to incentivize better alternatives.

National School Choice Week, an annual event promoting the ability of parents and students to have greater options in K-12 education, starts today. Over 21,000 events involving almost 17,000 schools from all 50 states will take place over the coming days. Go here to get more information about events and data about how increasing school choice—charters, vouchers, educational savings accounts, and more—is one of the best ways to improve education for all Americans. As a proud media sponsor of National School Choice Week, Reason will be publishing daily articles, podcasts, videos, interviews, and other coverage exploring the ways in which education is being radically altered and made better by letting more people have more choices when it comes to learning. For a constantly updated list of stories, go to Reason's archive page on "school choice."

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  1. But kids who do that sort of thing clearly have behavioral issues?issues that won’t be sorted out, and will likely be made worse, if they are convicted of a crime and sentenced to jail time.

    Define “kid”.

    1. Anyone not employed in the federal bureaucracy.

      1. Also, anyone who is old enough to twist language and stir up controversy. In this regard, law enforcement personnel have a very clear role to play, in weeding out and jailing some of the recalcitrant “satirists” who avail themselves of electronic means to mock, impersonate and ridicule distinguished academic department chairmen. Surely no one here would dare to defend the “First Amendment dissent” of a single, isolated judge in America’s leading criminal “parody” case? See the documentation at:

        http://raphaelgolbtrial.wordpress.com/

        1. I’ll probably never click the link, but reading the darting nonsense on its way to the predictable end is like running down a mountain trail: always entertaining for its ridiculous twists and turns and the not-zero risk of smacking your head into a rock.

          In fact, I think the metaphor is wonderful: it’s a veritable mountain of malarky.

    2. Well, 18-year-old humans are still teens and therefore kids. So I’m guessing you stop being a kid at 20.

    3. For starters, anyone required by law to attend school. Beyond that, anyone too young to vote, serve on a jury, own a gun, buy cigarettes, sign contracts, be outside past 10pm, have their own residence, etc.

    4. You’re a kid until you can change a tire.

      1. +1 F-u-u-u-u-udge

      2. I lol’d

    5. Any human under the age of majority.

    6. Anyone illegally possesing a firearm, between the ages of birth and 24.

  2. You could dilate his eyes (the medicine burns like hell), and tell him they were “blinding drops”. The effects appear in about 15 minutes and wear off in about 3 hours. Does anyone think this would improve the (kid’s) behavior, if administered with enough menace?

    1. the medicine burns like hell

      Weenie. Confuse peroxide cleaning solution for saline or contaminate your contact solution with aftershave sometime. It’s like lighting a piece of sandpaper on fire and then putting it in your eye.

      Seriously, good idea for ‘just and equitable’ punishment.

  3. “This kid seems like he has a real problem, and some kind of harsh disciplinary measure would have been well justified.”

    Sure, the school could have kicked him out for the rest of the semester, but that would be part of the “disproportinate suspension of students of color” (if the student was black) or in any case depriving him of the opportunity for an education (if he was white).

    They could paddle him, but that would violate his student rights.

    These are all actual dogmas which activists, with great success, try to impose on public schools.

    And if you don’t cross your “t”s and dot your “i”s, then you can get sued.

    So the schools outsource discipline to cops who are better able to shrug off any public backlash and are accustomed to dealing with lawsuits as a part of doing business.

  4. You might think a kid who deliberately chucked something at a teacher deserves a harsh punishment, and I would agree.

    To be sure.

    1. I got to that part of the post and suddenly realized who I was reading and stopped.

    2. Sentence him to be Robby’s intern for a month. That should set him straight.

      1. Is it true that Robby’s interns spend so much time brushing his hair that their fingers become permanently clenched in a comb-holding position?

    3. Isn’t this an open and shut case of assault and battery? This “kid” needs to pay for this teacher’s medical costs, missed time, and emotional suffering.

      1. Should the school’s workplace insurance cover it? Dealing with teens is like dealing with wild animals, you never know when one of the savages is going to leap up and tear off your face.

      2. “Isn’t this an open and shut case of assault and battery?”

        No. It’s not reasonable to expect a 17-year-old to be able to predict that a paper airplane would cause anyone an injury. It’s “an open and shut case” of unacceptable classroom clowning and should have been treated as such.

  5. I won’t be able to properly understand this without one or more studies from respected sociologists.

    1. It’s okay if the study’s findings are completely non-reproducible, right?

      1. Only as long as they comport to my existing biases.

        1. I would also accept them being neutral to my biases if they were against biases I don’t like.

      2. You know who else was completely non-reproducible?

        1. Peter Abelard?

        2. Marylin?

  6. Even if the school hadn’t employed an SRO, this still would have ended up a criminal matter if the teacher chose to press charges. I’d argue that while ‘discipline’ does belong to the schools, it’s no longer (just) a disciplinary issue when the behavior crosses into criminal action. I hope you’re not arguing that committing a crime on school property gets the offender off the hook as to criminal liability, whereas the state is free to prosecute someone who does the same things twenty feet from the school boundaries.

    It’s the flip side to alleged sexual assault in college – a criminal matter best left to the police, and not for administrators to deal with.

    1. “…it’s no longer (just) a disciplinary issue when the behavior crosses into criminal action.”

      Unfortunately, what we now define as criminal has leaned way into what used to be considered simple juvenile misbehavior. We need to back off on what we consider criminal, and, yes, the rules should be less stringent for kids.

      1. Poking someone in the eye is a criminal act for libertarians. It does violate the NAP.

        1. A teenager throwing a paper airplane at someone is not a criminal act for libertarians who have the common sense not to follow a principle over a cliff.

          1. Since he said he intended to hit the teacher in the head I’m really not seeing how this isn’t violating the NAP.

            1. Very technically, it is a violation of the NAP, but reasonable adults don’t follow their principles to the point of absurdity. Sneezing without a hanky is technically a violation of the NAP if you want to get ridiculous about it. I don’t want anyone prosecuted for that, either.

  7. It looks to me like David Michael Elliott earned his 30 days in jail.

    In the enormous hierarchy of failures that is the public education, you pick this asshole as an example of how the system doesn’t work.

    If the system did work properly, David Michael Elliott wouldn’t be compelled to sit in a public-run detention center every day (also know as going to school) against his wishes.

    If the system did work properly, David Michael Elliott would have been ejected from the private institution that wasn’t compelled to provide services to proto-adults with behavior problems.

    yada yada yada

    1. It suggests he’s had behavioral problems before. How did the school respond to his earlier behavior? Should he have been in school at all by this time?

      Was he kept in class so as to avoid damaging his academic career with a suspension? (see above)

      1. From the article:

        According to the teacher, as summarized in the police report, “he and Elliott had been involved in past confrontations over Elliott’s behavior and “something needs to be done.””

        What discipline, if any, was meted out for these “past confrontations”?

        1. Suspensions, most likely.

          1. Which, sadly, is why the student’s race becomes relevant because given the pressure on the schools not to “disproportionately” suspend black students.

            And, again, if the student was white the schools might have more leeway to suspend him without racism accusations, but there would still be the accusations that they’re neglecting their responsibility to educate him and by keeping him on the streets they’re turning him to a life of crime, etc.

            1. (Will I ever have egg on my face if it turns out the student was actually Asian)

              1. No, but if you’d like, it can be arranged.

                [squats and starts straining]

              2. It’s always Asians and African Americans with you.

                *hums Black and Yellow*

    2. You can leave school at 16. He was 17.

  8. They have those goddamn SRO running around the schools in Texas too.

    And the innocent-sounding euphemism – “school resource officer”. What is that even supposed to mean?

    1. Yesterday one of Soav’s articles mentioned some state school system was “prioritizing dental health”. It means what that means.

  9. Cops talk to minor without counsel or parent. What kid says in conversation leads to his arrest.

    The case is a house of cards.

    1. Yeah, this was my thought. IANAL, but the minor doesn’t have the right to remain silent and/or an attorney rather explicitly because the minor isn’t exactly capable of knowing right from wrong and, as such, can’t be relied upon to testify against themself.

      Deputy Paul Glover et al. needs to get the shit sued out of them for trying to enforce the law where the law as written doesn’t apply.

      1. because the minor isn’t exactly capable of knowing right from wrong

        How do you know that, exactly? The fact that someone’s brain isn’t fully developed doesn’t mean they’re entirely unable to tell right from wrong (which are subjective anyway); it’s not all-or-nothing. Also, most adults are terrible at long-term thinking, and various things like being tired, being high, being stressed, etc. can reduce that ability anymore. I’m honestly not seeing the huge difference here, and I’m quite tired of people deluding themselves into believing that the difference really is that large. Why treat this as an all-or-nothing issue?

        None of this justifies arresting the kid, but I don’t like this particular excuse.

    2. One would hope that even a mildly competent public defender would be able to get the case thrown out, but “mildly competent public defender” is an oxymoron. Hopefully his parents can afford a real lawyer.

  10. Doesn’t Reason normally argue that schools should spend less time worrying about possible criminal actions and let law enforcement handle that? If someone assaults someone else, that seems best handled by law enforcement not the school dolling out disciplinary action.

    1. Reason does so generally and correctly under the assumption that throwing/hitting someone with a paper airplane doesn’t constitute assault.

      If I were to recommend you have a friend throw airplanes at you repeatedly, then dial 911 and claim you’re being assaulted in order to see what happens and something bad actually happened and you sued me. Do you think it would be because the police showed up and shit happened, because you flagrantly abused the 911 system (at my hypothetical recommendation), or because you were legitimately assaulted.

      1. I’m not proposing calling 911 on anytime someone throws a paper airplane, but if someone throws a paper airplane which results in someone requiring eye surgery that’s a bit different.

        1. To add on, I wouldn’t call 911 if someone simply shoved someone else, but if that person hits their head on the concrete and is knocked out as a result of the shove, you don’t think that might constitute assault?

          1. I’m pretty sure that, legally, it’s assault in both cases, and assault-and-battery in the second.

            1. It’s battery in both cases. Battery does not just meaning bludgeoning someone, it means any kind of bodily harm, or even contact. Even wiping your booger on someone’s face would be battery.

              1. *unwanted harm or contact

              2. Flicking boogers is battery ?

                Help, I need a lawyer now.

            2. The kid actually could be charged with second degree assault since the person required surgery. He could have gotten 3 years for it.

              1. Ah, nm, I see the surgery took place before the airplane hit him in the eye.

                Probably was damned painful and he was probably pissed, though.

                1. Probably was damned painful and he was probably pissed, though.

                  I don’t think it hurt any more than a regular airplane to the eye. I 1000% expect the prior surgery only matters because humans and sympathy.

                  1. As evidence, see; Eye surgery hurts?I know, I’ve had it?and taking a paper airplane in the eye sounds pretty awful.

                    Dozens of different possible ‘eye surgeries’ varying from debilitating to entirely painless and dozens more ways to treat any pain resulting from any surgeries… but Robby seems convinced that they shared the same “You hold him down while I heat up the fireplace poker.”-type of eye surgery. Despite the more likely and just as plausible notion that McIves just had Lasik and was worried the injury might, somehow, deleteriously affect his vision and he’d be out the couple thousand dollars.

        2. So… what makes it a crime is the kid’s very bad luck? If he hits the teacher in the cheek, it’s not assault? What if his paper airplane gives the teacher a papercut?

          This all sounds a bit like Not The Onion, TBH…

          1. So… what makes it a crime is the kid’s very bad luck? If he hits the teacher in the cheek, it’s not assault?

            Correct, and I see no problem with that. The teacher did not ask to have things thrown at his head. In fact, we can be fairly certain the teacher made it clear that throwing things at him was not permissible.

          2. Hey man, ‘moral luck’ is a real thing in our legal system. Ends justify punishment.

            A) You get hammy and drive home with a .18 bac but make it home safe, no punishment.

            B) You get hammy and drive home with a .18 bac but get pulled over, DUI and punishment.

            C) You get hammy and drive home with a .18 bac but you get in an accident, DUI and severe punishment.

            The above illustrates the very real philosophical conundrums of Moral Luck. The actor in each scenario pursues the same action, in the same way; punishment is determined completely but the outcome. But the A and C did the same action, are they equally culpable? Should ends be the only consideration, if so the difference between A, B, and C is just luck, regardless of the action.

            1. I’m generally against BAC standards for various reasons, but the “moral luck” you describe is inherent in all criminal activity. By definition, moral and ethical prosecution of any crime requires evidence, defendant, etc. Example:

              1. Guy goes to kill someone; succeeds and never gets caught.
              2. Guy goes to kill someone, fails and gets caught.
              3. Guy goes to kill fellow criminal, succeeds and gets caught.
              4. Guy goes to kill a federal judge presiding over a case where the guy is defendant, succeeds and gets caught.

              All vastly different outcomes. Some based upon luck of being caught, but the disparate outcome between being caught and not being caught should have no relevance on whether the law and subsequent punishment is good/bad.

              Otherwise fakir becomes something like modifying the penalties of murderers based upon total murders solved and unsolved.

              Whether that’s moral luck is a separate question, but it is life and I’ve heard it isn’t fair.

          3. Attendant circumstances are hard for idiots to grasp. Keep trying.

        3. Note: Eye surgery occurred before paper airplane contact.

          1. Correct:

            According to the incident report, McIver – a science teacher, who also serves on the Florence Public School District One Board of Trustees – contacted the school resource officer, Deputy Paul Glover, and told him he had been struck in the eye. In the report, Glover noted McIver’s eye appeared “very red.” Glover said McIver was “very upset” about being struck in the eye because of a recent ocular surgery.

            McIver reported he spoke with other students, Glover said, who told him Elliott threw the paper airplane at him during class. He added, Glover said, he and Elliott had been involved in past confrontations over Elliott’s behavior and “something needs to be done.” Glover said McIver also told him, if Elliott was responsible, he wanted to press charges.

            Glover reported he then met with Elliott and a vice principal in the school’s conference room. It was then, he said, Elliott said he did throw the paper airplane at McIver. Elliott added he intended to hit McIver in the head, Glover said, instead of the eye. Glover added Elliott did not provide a “logical reason” as to why he threw the airplane at McIver.

          2. Going into Opthamologist’s surgery and throwing paper airplanes makes the malice even more extreme.

        4. I’m not proposing calling 911 on anytime someone throws a paper airplane, but if someone throws a paper airplane which results in someone requiring eye surgery that’s a bit different.

          Eye surgery was prior to being hit with the plane and, as near as indicated, was incidental at best.

    2. I know. It’s almost as if a paper airplane thrown in high school by a minor is substantially different from a rape on a college campus between adults or something. Fucking Reason. Fucking Soave.

      1. Yes, rape and assault are substantially different crimes, which is why they have substantially different punishments. If the teacher didn’t complain or press the issue, it should have been fine, but he did, and legally he was assaulted. What’s the problem?

        We can argue the guy is a pussy or whatever for complaining, but that is irrelevant.

    3. Doesn’t Reason normally argue that schools should spend less time worrying about possible criminal actions and let law enforcement handle that?

      For sexual assault on college campuses, yes. Because there the students are (allegedly) adults, not minors. K-12, not so much.

      1. Calling the 18-22-year-olds at college “adults” is a stretch, but I guess we have to draw the line somewhere.

  11. Edward McIver: Biggest PUSSY in history – and PROUD of it!

  12. If the schools are just gonna had everything off to the cops, why do they need all those administrators? Just have one secretary/receptionist and a coupla cops and fire the principals, counselors, etc.

    1. Fuck it, just use the newly-freed space we have in the prisons and keep the kids there.

    2. Fuck it, just use the newly-freed space we have in the prisons and keep the kids there.

  13. I recall sitting in gymnasium with friend on some bleachers after school, and the SRO – a new cutting edge tool for the drugwar at the time – entered gym from other side of the court. He “ordered” us to approach him with our hands where he could see them. So we just bailed out of there; and the SRO, a forty-something dude made out of Twinkies, thought it a good idea to give chase. He made it about two steps and we heard a shoe-slip squeak on the court, followed by a smack! sound and…silence. SRO was out clean on the gym floor. So we continued our escape.

    And we would’ve gotten away with everything – except my friend was one of about five black people in the school. Doh.

      1. You can be one of his “many stalkers.”

        1. I get more then enough of him here, why would I want to stalk him?

          1. I suspect that he thinks he’s being stalked whenever his grandkids come to visit and he doesn’t remember who they are.

            1. Guys, remember to read Hihn’s comments in the voice of an old vampire whose teeth have fallen out.

      2. The.
        Best.

        “(Tone and boldface in self defense of aggression)”

        1. Everyone knows that bold fonts are the most effective defense against bullying by psychotic fascist Ron Paul cultists.

          1. I find it hilarious that Ron Paul, retired for 4 years now, is Hinh’s “b?te noire”. Could it be because Ron Paul, despite his impurity, inconsistent principles, and general kookiness, got more people to call themselves libertarian than Hihnself ever did?

      3. He only listed 10 of 25 so there’s still hope.

        1. Those were probably the only names he could remember.

      4. Damn, I’m not on the list either. I better step up my game.

    1. If reason banned the old fool he’d probably gain 7 years of life from stress relief.

      On the other hand… Reason, please never ban the old fool.

      1. MORE aggression from psychotic libtard fascists!

        1. You guys are gonna feel so bad after he dies and we find out he was another homeless dude.

          1. He’s the former executive director of the Washington State Libertarian Party, and he owns his own management company in Boise.

            1. And J sub D was a prince among men. Hihn is just a senile twat.

            2. If you google “Michael Hihn libertarian,” the first picture that pops up is Sheldon Richman.

              1. Here is his pic: http://libertyissues.com/

                1. That looks like Old Man Jenkins. Shouldn’t he be dressing up as a ghost and chasing the Sccoby Doo gang?

    2. Fuck you Crusty, that second place spot was mine! I knew I’d never beat John, but this is a disgrace. Hihn’s Fascist List is rigged!

      1. It’s that competitive edge for The Father’s approval that pushes the Nazi to such great undertakings.

    3. Another awesome revelation from those comments: Michael Hihn considers AddictionMyth to be a clever satirist.

      1. He is soooo clever that you can’t even tell how clever he is.

    4. Damn. This is the downside of ignoring Hihn.

      1. Maybe the anti-vaxxers were right about Hihnoculation?

      2. Damn. This is the downside of not even knowing who the fuck Hihn is.

        1. Youll find out. Just say something positive about the paul family.

          1. And then come back to the thread at least four hours after everyone else has abandoned it.

      1. Reason’s very own ‘Deplorables’ has gone international!

      2. Aggressive yodeling is just the kind of behavior you can expect from a fascist psychotic Paultard bully.

    5. Oh man, I started reading some of the other comments… Hihn’s posts may not be the most disingenuous in this one case.

      Shame!

  14. Was the kid black? That is relevant because this article, there are complaints about “the number of black male suspensions” in the county schools.

    1. because *according to* this article

  15. Where’s Taylor Gatto when you need him?

    1. He’s still kicking.

  16. I broke down and read that dumb cunt’s self-congratulatory wordpuke in the

    1. in the bush? in the bush? in the bush?

    2. in the white room with black curtains?

    3. in the membrane in which you’re insane?

    4. in the EEEEENNNNNNDDDD?

    5. .. kitchen with the candlestick?

  17. Fuck. rewrite-

    I read that dumb cunt’s self-congratulatory wordpuke in the Nation. Just as I suspected, she writes as if she envisions herself to be some sort of 21st century Ernest Hemingway (with tits and grrrlpowrz), fighting Donald Trump instead of fighting bulls, although I can’t help thinking she’d freak out and call the cops if you tried to take her elbow to keep her from stumbling off the curb.

    I liked this part:

    ? The J20 detainees have been released, some with felony rioting charges to be tried in DC Superior Court next month?a harsh prosecutorial reaction that seasoned DC activists had not expected.

    Not everyone can participate in a black bloc. Those with a vulnerable immigration status, or arrest records, or good reasons to fear police repression because of the color of their skin, often don’t participate in activities where the risk of arrest is high. Friday’s bloc was by no means all white, but it was predominantly white. If bearers of white privilege can do one thing, it is put ourselves on the line and take risks where others can’t.

    Waitammint! We’re all brave and empowered, and shit, but come on. We’re striking a blow for Social Justice against the big bad fascists, and you want to treat us like common criminals? Not fair! We’re heroes of the revolution. We can’t be expected to bear the consequences of our actions. That’s not how it works in the movies.

    also-

    “Take up the White Man’s Burden”

    1. “a harsh prosecutorial reaction that seasoned DC activists had not expected.”

      This may be part of the problem…if they come to expect felony prosecution as rioters they may be less inclined to riot.

      “La di da, look at me, here I am protesting fascism and breaking and burning things tee hee…OMG I GOT ARRESTED!”

      1. Reminds me of that youtube of the girl protester whacking the cop over the head with a foam pool noodle, so the cop nonchalantly pulls out a can of capsaicin and sprays it in her face.

    2. it is put ourselves on the line and take risks where others can’t.

      And as I’ve said before, this is why we need to get rid of anti-dueling laws. People like this think they’re taking ‘risks’ by attacking other people, and then getting arrested. They want to commit violence against people and demand no response but what they think is a photo-op to showcase their ‘oppression’. Put them in a fair fight where someone can hit back and they’ll suddenly decide violence isn’t a solution.

    3. We can’t be expected to bear the consequences of our actions. That’s not how it works in the movies.

      Those with a vulnerable immigration status, or arrest records, or good reasons to fear police repression because of the color of their skin, often don’t participate in activities where the risk of arrest is high.

      The best way to politically act out against an idiot who thinks illegal immigrants are violent rapists and criminals? Actively and openly contemplate ways to encourage illegal immigrants to destroy property and participate in civil unrest! It’d almost be funnier if she had flat out said, “If he wants a war on immigrants, he’s got it!” except people probably would end up dying.

      There is no peak derp.

    4. Her bloc has the sickest struggle sessions.

  18. Let the teacher poke out the kid’s eye. Call it even.

    1. An eye for an eye. Literally.

  19. My dad has a story from when he was a troublesome rabble rouser in his high school days about making a paper airplane out of a book cover. For weight and balance, he used a thumbtack, and had it sticking pointy end first out of the front of the airplane. He threw it down what he thought was an empty hallway. Unfortunately for him the principal came around the corner at just the wrong time. You can probably guess what happened next: the principal ended up with the paper airplane stuck in forehead. Unfortunately for my dad, his name was on the book cover.

    Amazingly, he didn’t get arrested for assault. Simpler times, I guess.

    1. We used to have these pens that made the perfect spitball guns if you took out the ink cartridge. Someone figured out that the perfect ammo was created if you stabbed the pen down on top of an orange peel. You had to blow a little harder, but the round piece of orange piece would fly pretty far. So I decided to load up by stabbing down on the orange peel repeatedly. Unfortunately my spitball gun got clogged and I kept blowing and blowing and nothing happened. So I got a lung-full of air and gave it all I had. Unfortunately, I complete forgot to aim at my friend and the whole mess peppered the teacher in the middle of class. She was a young pretty thing and boy, did she get mad. I was kinda hoping for a spanking, but all I got was the principal’s office.

      1. “Teacher needs to see me after school…”

        Stop, that was just silly.

        1. … well, he got it bad, got it bad, got it bad, there is that ….

  20. I can actually remember a classmate getting paddled for talking back to the teacher. I suspect that wouldn’t fly today.

    1. This was in 2011, in Catholic school.

      1. public school, I won’t give the year.

  21. When I was in high school we had a math teacher with a great pitching arm. On several occasions I witnessed her beaning a misbehaving or sleeping student in the head with an eraser.

  22. Surely this demands an expanded role for the TSA.

  23. If they had these rules when i was a kid I’d be in prison for a long time.

  24. Seems this kid had isbehaved sufficiently in the past to have grounds for removal long before this. Maybe he’s “missed” too many “cues”. Maybe he won’t miss this one.

    Of course, I’ll have to take this back to the stupid way gummint skewlz handle children, particularly boys… forcing them into the feminised mould of the “”model student”, which few boys are. School has been dumbed down and feminised to much these days it is particularly dificult for boys, who ARE different than girls (obvious to most of us here, but not to school admin types, nor “educators” (a more accurate word might be “handlers”)

  25. He could have put somebody’s eye out!!!!!!!!/s

  26. I’d still be in prison for the shit I used to do in high school. I think I was 27 when I finally had a moment of clarity. I wasn’t going to win against a society that despised me, so I left the hijinks behind me, and morphed into an asshole.

  27. “schools’ increasing reliance on the police has profound negative consequences for kids. Disciplinary matters that should be handled by principals, teachers, and counsellors are instead left in the hands of cops, who have at their disposal a much harsher set of corrective measures”

    Eh – it can, I suppose, but I believe the author underappreciates how completely out-of-hand many students are, particularly in inner cities. Students who are physically assaulting other students and school staff aren’t going to respond to being sent to detention, and we certainly don’t want to rely on school staff to (and school staff don’t want to be responsible for) maintaining ultimate physical order within the classroom. Five-minutes of YouTube searching reveals why, at least in some schools, law enforcement is necessary, and I don’t see any logistical hurdle to reading Bobby McTeenager his miranda rights before arresting him.

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  30. This tragic nonsense stems from liberal mindsets and is, I believe, just one more reason for this:

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    http://www.thenation.com/artic…..-democrats

    And this was before the 2016 election.

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