Donald Trump

What Queen Elizabeth Reveals About Trump

Some traditions are worth maintaining.

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'The Crown'
'The Crown,' Netflix

Life for a modern monarch is often a jeweled prison, with an excess of tedium and a dearth of authority. Anyone who detests the idea of royals can take satisfaction in how insignificant they have become. But their adaptation to this shrunken role sheds a revealing light on Donald Trump.

In its first season, the Netflix series The Crown depicts the early years of Queen Elizabeth II's reign. What becomes more obvious with each episode is that not only does the young sovereign lack the commanding power of William the Conqueror or Henry VIII but also she can rarely get her way even on outwardly trivial matters.

She doesn't want to live at Buckingham Palace. She doesn't want to deprive her children of their father's surname. She doesn't want to quash her sister's marriage plans. Over and over, though, she capitulates.

Watching, I kept wishing she would rise up and declare, "I'm the freaking queen of England, and I'll do as I damn well please!" She never does. Reverence for the past stands in the way.

Though the great powers of the British crown have been taken away by Parliament, the cramped discretion Elizabeth endures is also one of her own choice. She could rebel against the suffocating conventions—because really, who's to stop her? But she accepts her duty to follow tradition.

The American presidency has many powers, some stipulated in the Constitution and some established by those who occupied the White House. But presidents have usually observed certain long-standing norms meant to foster respect for the office, promote national cohesion and encourage democratic compromise.

In Britain, the prime minister is the head of government and the queen is the head of state. Here, the president is both, acting as both the chief executive of the federal government and the ceremonial leader of the nation. The latter role has been shaped over centuries by men who recognized the limits and gravity of the office they held.

Trump, however, accepts no limits or norms of behavior, insisting on doing exactly what suits him. He refuses to make public his tax returns. He includes his children, who are also his business partners, in meetings about government business.

He pops off on Twitter whenever the urge strikes. He tramples over ethical boundaries. He insults his critics. He exalts himself. He behaves with a sense of entitlement that brooks no opposition.

It's hard to recall that in 1998, congressional Republicans were so appalled by Bill Clinton's illicit affair and brazen deceptions that they impeached him. In his 2000 campaign, George W. Bush made a pointed promise to "uphold the honor and dignity of the office."

That's an obligation dating back to George Washington. On the website of the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, historian Stephen Knott writes that our first president never "sought to use his office for personal empowerment or gain. Neither did he shelter his friends for the sake of their friendships when conflicts of interest arose." His "restraint, solemnity, judiciousness, and nonpartisan stance created an image of presidential greatness, or dignity, that dominates the office even today."

Or did. It may not take Trump long to make Americans forget there was a time when presidents practiced such virtues. Once, a leader who defended a Russian dictator while mocking U.S. intelligence professionals would have been pilloried as an appeaser, if not a traitor. But Trump has shown how easily the outrageous can come to seem ordinary.

His rise brings to mind Daniel Patrick Moynihan's 1993 essay, "Defining Deviancy Down," which lamented the collapse of standards of behavior and the resulting epidemic of violent crime.

"We have been re-defining deviancy so as to exempt much conduct previously stigmatized," he wrote, "and also quietly raising the 'normal' level in categories where behavior is now abnormal by any earlier standard." In short, "we are getting used to a lot of behavior that is not good for us."

It can't be good for a president to cultivate ignorance, to undermine bipartisan policies on a whim, to bully private companies or to demonize anyone who crosses him. Trump's style is at war with the concept of the office as a public trust.

George Washington endeavored to define the presidency in a way that affirmed he was not a monarch like the one Americans had rebelled against. Today, the queen of England behaves in a manner reminiscent of Washington, while the president-elect impersonates a czar.

© Copyright 2017 by Creators Syndicate Inc.

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  1. He’s had eight years of pen and phone preceding him. The office doesn’t have much respect left.

    1. After we deal with Obozo’s single-handed launching of WAR against Libya, his running of guns to Mexican drug lords through his henchman Eric Holder and his abrogation of immigration law, then we might be concerned about what Trump will do as president. AFTER Hitlery, Holder and Obozo are safely ensconced in their prison cells, and the door securely welded shut… then I will worry about what Trump might do.

      At present, it’s premature.

  2. Blessed is the man, who having nothing to say, abstains from giving wordy evidence of the fact.

    1. Are you trying to destroy the Internet?

  3. Maybe you should’ve held off on publishing this one at least until 21 Jan…?

  4. It can’t be good for a president to cultivate ignorance, to undermine bipartisan policies on a whim, to bully private companies or to demonize anyone who crosses him.
    No need to harp on the man when he only has a few days left in office.

    1. Yes. Can you say “Washington Redskins?”

      1. Pxfragonard: You racist, xenophobe, homophobe, islamophobe, cleithrophobe, and several other epithets that you can find on EVERY progressive website.

  5. So why did chapman vote for hillary after seeing this article?

    1. He’s an idiot who actually believes Hillary is better in this regard.
      I wish I was kidding.

      1. ‘He’s an idiot.’

        There, I FIFY.

        1. ‘He’s an idiot’

          True. Fire Steve Chapman

  6. For god sakes trump isnt even president yet

    1. I’m really hoping actually taking office will change Trump’s more outrageous behavior. I’m hoping he’ll lose his phone and we won’t be bombarded with more tweets deriding one person or another. I hope he finally realizes this is not a reality show. However, I expect those hopes to be unfulfilled.

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  8. Chapman never fails to live up to his reputation.

    1. True, at least he excels at being a total idiot.

  9. Steve Chapman isn’t worthy to lick Elizabeth’s shoes. He supported the disgusting polar opposite of her, a power hungry childish woman.

    Watching, I kept wishing she would rise up and declare, “I’m the freaking queen of England, and I’ll do as I damn well please!” She never does.

    This says way more about Chapman’s shitty view of power than it does Elizabeth.

    1. This. He supported hillary he has no credibility here

    2. Exactly. The Queen is respected precisely because she has comported herself with grace, humility, and aplomb. She never demands anything on the basis of her title because, thanks to the respect she has earned, she never needs to.

      1. Very well said. I suspect the Queen knows the correct definition of the word “dignity”, unlike most prog snowflakes who think that “dignity” is “you kowtow to my every wish or I’ll cry…really loud!”

      2. She never demands anything on the basis of her title

        I think Prince Charles might disagree.

    3. He kept wishing that she would shout “I’m the freaking queen of England, and I’ll do as I damn well please!”

      And yet that is what Trump more or less does.

      Which one does he actually want?

    4. He kept wishing that she would shout “I’m the freaking queen of England, and I’ll do as I damn well please!”

      And yet that is what Trump more or less does.

      Which one does he actually want?

  10. It can’t be good for a president to …undermine bipartisan policies on a whim

    Actually, yeah, that’s a good idea far more often than not. “Bipartisan” policies are almost universally dreadful.

    1. To quote the late Christopher Hitchens, “bipartisan” is often a polite way of saying “single party rule.”

  11. “He behaves with a sense of entitlement that brooks no opposition.”

    Really, he might as well be a Democrat!

  12. Why arent i up 50 pts?!

    Chapman has a fetish for top men

  13. I’m no defender of Trump, but this article doesn’t make any sense.

    1. It’s Chapman.

      1. I think he’s speculating who would win in a fight between a 70 year old who hates physical contact, and a 90 year old who clawed her way to the top of the heap over the mutilated corpses of her forebears.

        1. “…a 90-year-old who was handed one of the world’s most prestigious offices due to an accident of birth.”

          FTFY.

    2. It seems to be saying: I wish the Queen had been more like Trump, and I wish Trump was more like the Queen. Yeah.

      1. Dr. Doolittle.

  14. Inbred welfare recipients. Can we stop obsessing over them?

    1. One good thing that will come from the end of days is the death of all Monarchs as well.

  15. A president gets a technology whereby he can speak tinthe people direct without any gate keeper. Faggoty gatekeepers shit pants. God i love this election. And Trump isnt even President. I cant wait. And the progs are certain to triple down, thus Trump can play them like like a Geddy Lee bass riff. !!!!!!!!!! Wait…one more !

    1. A president gets a technology whereby he can speak tinthe people direct without any gate keeper. Faggoty gatekeepers shit pants.

      This. So much this.

  16. Btw Chapman. This dolt sees Trumps family involvement as a good thing. They love each other. They trust each other. They listen to one another. They watch the others back. So instead if facing one talented person,. Now you face a group. Functional families are an asset.

  17. “Because we’ve always done it that way” is not a good enough reason to do something.

    Now if there was something worthwhile in the answer to “Why was it done that way?” that might be.

  18. Oh, and, QE2, hang in there until Charles keels over. He should not be allowed to take the crown.

    1. I think we’re on QE37 now.

      1. That’s a lot of sunken cruise liners.

    2. Seems unlikely.

      And who cares?

      1. Charles is a warmist. I’m now decidedly an Amti-warmist. I am opposed to letting warmists hold even symbolic offices where they might do damage.

        1. I bet Harry is too. I wouldn’t look to the British monarchy to start pushing any views outside of the political mainstream.

          1. Charles outraged anti-gunners by expressing the opinion that further restrictions on objects would not change behavior.

            He’s a qualified pilot and ship commander.

            He’s old and tepid, but not the waste many Americans seem to believe he is.

      2. And who cares?

        Any Commonwealther who has had to swear an oath to Elizabeth, and really, really doesn’t want to have to swear one to her idiot son?

  19. “So-called ‘journalist’ called me a queen. Sad!”

  20. What this reveals is that Donald Trump has taken up residence in Chapman’s head. This is so stupid as to be unworthy of a serious response. Not everything has to do or says anything about Donald Trump. In fact, the vast majority of things in the world do not. If you think otherwise, the problem involves you and has nothing to do with Trump, whatever you think of him.

  21. He tramples over ethical boundaries. He insults his critics. He exalts himself. He behaves with a sense of entitlement that brooks no opposition.

    Someone needs to inform Chapman that Obama is going to leave office this month and it is a bit late to be bitching about him.

    1. Describes a lot of presidents. I won’t be the least surprised if it describes Trump as president too, but it’s hardly something new.

      1. Yes. See number 2’s point below. It is a bit rich to hold Trump to the standard of Washington and then act like anyone outside of Washington has ever met it.

  22. It’s hard to recall that in 1998, congressional Republicans were so appalled by Bill Clinton’s illicit affair and brazen deceptions that they impeached him. In his 2000 campaign, George W. Bush made a pointed promise to “uphold the honor and dignity of the office.”

    That was for having an affair with an intern while he was in office. No one wanted to impeach Clinton for being a womanizer before he got in office. Beyond that, everyone who knows much, and granted Chapman isn’t part of that group, knows that Presidents from Jackson to FDR to Kennedy to Johnson behaved in appalling ways when in office. Did Johnson get impeached for playing what amounted to sex tapes of MLK and his mistress at White House meetings? Did Kennedy get impeached for having a parade of mistresses at the White House?

    1. As I understand it, he was impeached for perjury rather than the affair.

      1. Yes he was. That is a good point. Lying under oath about an affair with a White House Intern while in office in Chapman’s view is nothing like as bad as saying mean things on Twitter.

        And I would love to know what ethical rules Trump has ever broken? Sorry but saying rude things about women in private is not a violation of the JER.

        1. One of JER’s kids, eh?

      2. Yes. They had to. Congress is a court and cannot accept perjury. It undermines its authority over the executive branch. They couldn’t allow that precedent. Minimal housekeeping.

    2. +1 Mimi Alford

  23. George Washington’s “restraint, solemnity, judiciousness, and nonpartisan stance created an image of presidential greatness, or dignity, that dominates the office even today.”

    Really? You were holding Donald Trump to the standard of George Washington?

    Name me one president since Washington who has demonstrated these qualities. And remind me exactly how Barack Obama demonstrated a “non-partisan stance.”

    1. No kidding. It went down hill immediately after he left office as Adams enacted the Alien and Sedition Acts. Even Jefferson went back on his word and did exactly the kind of thing he spent his life bitching about the Federalists doing when he agreed to the Louisiana Purchase.

      Is Chapman really this stupid?

      1. To be fair: the Louisiana Purchase, however unconstitutional, is one of the rare instances where the federal government got waaaay more value back than they spent.

        Hell, just one national park — Yellowstone or Arches — could be worth more in inflation adjusted dollars than the cost of the Louisiana Purchase.

        1. I don’t think it was a mistake. I just think it was against his principles. Thank God he was willing to be flexible because it was absolutely the right thing to do.

    2. Hell’s bells, Chapman, Washington’s style of leadership did not even survive Washington’s immediate successor, who signed a law making it a criminal offense to criticize him. That immediate successor then engaged in the vituperative political campaign of 1800 that makes today’s political campaigns look tame by comparison.

      1. Adams was one of the worst President’s in history. Other than maybe Wilson, you are hard pressed to come up with a worse President than Adams.

        1. LBJ will always make my top five list.

        2. F. D. R.

    3. I keep trying to compose a sentence using “Bill Clinton” and “dignity” but I just can’t manage it. Too much laughter, I collapse over the keyboard.

    4. Washington came under suspicion for a suspicious death of a French officer who died while being questioned. The Cherry Tree no one talks about.

  24. “In Britain, the prime minister is the head of government and the queen is the head of state. Here, the president is both, acting as both the chief executive of the federal government and the ceremonial leader of the nation.”

    Umm, wrong. We don’t have a “head of government” in this country because we, unlike Britain, have separation of powers. There is the head of the executive branch, the head of the legislative branch, and the head of the judicial branch. But no single “head of government”.

    1. This is a telling mistake, I think.

      1. Absolutely!

    2. The President is the “head” of the United States government from the perspective of other nations. On the domestic side, the Executive branch includes the multitude of agencies people deal with every day. Calling the President the head of the government does not mean he gets to do everything he wants, but he can do a whole lot more than either of the other branches. If Congress and the SCOTUS fail to be decent checks against the President, then yes he is most certainly the “head” of government.

      1. And, that is the general opinion of the voters. President as benevolent dictator.

        Sadly, with emphasis on Obama vs Trump so often encountered on this forum, I think it may be true here as well.

        As I’ve said before, local bureaucrats can have a more direct effect on your life than most presidents.

    3. he used the word “ceremonial”. as he phrased it, he’s correct.

  25. Mock the Cocaine Importation Agency? That had better stop. ASAP. Like at once.

  26. “Once, a leader who defended a Russian dictator while mocking U.S. intelligence professionals would have been pilloried as an appeaser, if not a traitor.”

    Funny. I distinctly recall a leader who mocked others for suggesting that Putin was a strategic threat to the United States. Something about the 1980s wanting it’s foreign policy back?

    1. You mean the intelligence agencies that reason and Chapman have spent the last 13 years excoriating over what they feel was lying about Iraqi WMDs? Or the ones who lied to Congress and the public multiple times about their collection activities on US residents and citizens?

      Suddenly, Trump says they are full of shit about Russia “hacking the election” and Chapman goes into full “how dare he” mode. This whole article is Chapman telling his readers he thinks they are morons who will believe anything he says no matter how preposterous or at odds with everything else he has ever written.

      1. This whole article is Chapman telling his readers he thinks they are morons who will believe anything he says no matter how preposterous or at odds with everything else he has ever written.

        It’s a living.

    2. James Clapper should be in prison, but now all of a sudden the progs are throwing around words like “traitor” and “treason” and have rediscovered the joys of a bellicose foreign policy because, you know, Trump. No principles, no integrity.

  27. Chapman likes to dress up as the Queen.

    1. Chapman likes to dress up as a Queen.

    2. I think you have a different and much more entertaining Chapman in mind.

  28. Ummm … several British monarchs have been publicly executed for being overly tyrannical. What you’re characterizing as tradition is more like “discreet self-preservation”.

    The only thing keeping the royals from being tossed out is they have adapted to being gracious figureheads who can be safely adored because they pose no threat.

    1. One British monarch has been publicly executed for tyranny; Charles 1st. Richard II had his throne taken from him by his wife and her lover and was later assassinated but he was not publicly executed. Richard III was killed in the battle of Bosworth Field. James II was removed from the throne and replaced by William and Mary, but he again was not publicly executed.

      Sorry to pick a nit.

    2. I think QE has alot of goodwill banked with the people of England because of her stoicism through wwii and afterwards. In 70 years, she has never (as far as I know) slipped up, embarrassed the crown, or been anything but a strong figurehead.

      That goodwill could be spent quickly once one of her douchey offspring assumes the throne. Wouldn’t surprise me if the people start questioning why there is a king/royal family.

      1. She has been in many ways a fine Queen. She has however failed at her most important job, producing a suitable heir to the throne.

        1. What waits in the wings is, injeej, unfortunate.

  29. The current president has openly asserted that he can have American citizens killed without judicial oversight, the “due process” being nothing more than whatever ricochets around his empty skull while he’s taking his morning shit. He’s even joked about droning people.

    But hey, that’s nothing; Trump sends mean tweets!

    It’s strange to me sometimes, the things that people consider “outrageous”.

    1. This.

      What would George Washington have said about this, Mr. Chapman?

  30. he insults his critics, about dam time that a republican confront his critics

  31. Would Reason stop publishing this idiot already. Fuckin’ lefty shill.

  32. The reason the UK still has a monarchy is that the monarchs have agreed to give up pretty much all their power.

    Monarchs who actually use their power tend to be beheaded or exiled.

    After several tries, they imported some monarchs who knew their place and were content to accept a government subsidy in exchange for looking pretty.

  33. The have a monarchy as a fail safe against there ever being another Cromwell. After Queen Anne died without any heirs, Parliament went out and found a family that had some claim to the throne, was reliably Protestant, and too stupid to cause any problems. That family was a small German one from Hanover.

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  35. Does Reason have some obligation to print Chapman’s columns? Does Chapman have photos of Gillespie living in a Marxist commune?

    This was probably the most worthless column Chapman has written in a long, string of worthless columns. It simply regurgitates the standard anti-Trump talking points without bothering to challenge, reflect or verify, and certainly offering nothing new or insightful. It’s a disgrace. If you’re going write a blatant Trump hit piece, the goddamn least you can do is write a fresh, original Trump hit piece.

  36. Which President are you talking about again?
    “It can’t be good for a president to cultivate ignorance [refuses to recognize or say Radical Islam?], to undermine bipartisan policies on a whim [Anti-Israel UN Resolution?], to bully private companies [Coal?] or to demonize anyone who crosses him. [Trump, particularly after his victory?]”

  37. Washington’s United States of America was quite different from the one Trump will govern. Slavery and a legal system that discriminated against women are no longer. Today we have few legal sanctions against homosexuality. And we have long cast the shadow of sentimental nostalgia for a return to monarchy or rule by an emperor (e.g., the Bonaparte Monarchy that emerged out of Revolutionary Republican France). Most of all, we are ethnically and racially diverse. The majority of Americans are no related to Anglo-Saxons either by blood or ethnicity, except for our semi-official language, and our different accents, metaphors, and typography are increasingly different. Trump is Constitutionally qualitied to be our President. It doesn’t matter that he doesn’t satisfy the standards for qualification of one or the other bloc of voters. Our country is better than Britain for our Constitutional latitude in choosing our leader to govern and to express the democratic process he or she symbolizes. Few here in our lifetime expect a so-called multi-cultural Britain to elect a non-white as British Prime Minister, and fewer still expect a non-white to become her Monarch. Our democratic republic proves that we are far more enlightened than the British.

  38. True enough, but there was almost nothing Obama could have done that would have made Congress put him in his place. “A rogue employee in the Phoenix office” got someone to sell weapons to bad guys to track the weapons. Yeah, all by himself. It took forever to work through cascading admissions that, yes, the ATF were involved but not the FBI. Really? Who was going to track them? OK, the FBI were involved but not the DOJ? Really? The FBI and ATF were going to concoct a thing like this without a thought of prosecutions at the end of the line? OK, the ATF, FBI, and DOJ were all involved in the planning and operation but they kept it from the Attorney General. Sure. OK, the AG got biweekly email reports but “he didn’t read them.”

    This is only one of the things Obama found out about in the papers. Only one of the “rogue employees in the __________ office,” the latest one being Homeland Security hacking the SoS’s computer in the State of Georgia. Now it turns out there were several states hacked around election time.

    What dignity is left? Yes, of course the appearance is important too and I too wish Trump would get that. But by far the greater part of dignity is not to abuse the office. The use of the IRS to win 2012 was by far the worst thing any president ever did in office. With no consequences whatsoever.

    When you need your house cleared of sewage, you don’t care about the crack of the plumber’s bum.

    1. lmao, well said

    2. “But by far the greater part of dignity is not to abuse the office. ”
      Yeah I got bad news for you, Trump will almost certainly abuse the office.

      “The use of the IRS to win 2012 was by far the worst thing any president ever did in office. ”
      Err… start a war on false pretences, internment of the Nissei.

  39. what i hated about ‘the crown’ was the manner in which people went out of their way to tell the new queen that “being an individual” could, in fact, lead to the destruction of the whole system (the abdication being proof supposedly).

    of the many, many criticisms i can direct toward trump, at least he’s brave enough to be who he is….and may god have mercy on the rest of us.

    as entertainment though, i highly recommend ‘the crown’.

  40. Liberal moron Steve Chapman can go to Hades. What in Hell did he think the NWO puppet, usurper did over eight years? THAT unverified poseur did his damndest to follow instruction to dismantle our Republic and succeeded for the most part. Trump is rough edged and will trod on many toes, but the REAL public elected him (warts and all) as the dragon slayer of the socialist/Marxist demon that America (the U.S.) has been pursuing since the time of Wilson. I did not vote for Trump but expect that he will far outshine the ineffectual, non-legally documented occupier of the White House, or the expected, unindicted criminal, Hillary. The media has been shameful in their pursuit of destruction of this man with false narratives and unabashed Myrmidonism of the left against Trump. If Trump fails in many respects to live up to the public’s expectations, he can (and then, should) be impeached. Until then the rabid hatred of the left should be quelled.

  41. The Queen behaves as she does because if she didn’t, the British government would unceremoniously show her the door. On the other hand, the President of the United States has real power, and a lot of power, so it’s bound to attract a certain kind of person. Not only that, the President is also the leader of the party that brought him to office. This has been true even when Washington was President.

    1. I thought Washington and Adams-I didn’t favor political parties? Although I agree Jefferson and POST-Jefferson.

  42. I agree with the larger point made here. But I have a hard time believing that the likes of Gingrich, Livingston, Hastert, Barr, Hyde & the rest were appalled by anything Clinton did, except win twice.

  43. “…while the president-elect impersonates a czar.”

    Well, it’s not like the soon-to-be ex-president, with his abuse of EOs and the arrogance of his party in unilaterally passing Obamacare, was a model of Presidential propriety.

    1. Hardly worse than the guy who lied the country into war because of vanity, oil lust & unresolved daddy issues.

  44. “Or did. It may not take Trump long to make Americans forget there was a time when presidents practiced such virtues. Once, a leader who defended a Russian dictator while mocking U.S. intelligence professionals would have been pilloried as an appeaser, if not a traitor. But Trump has shown how easily the outrageous can come to seem ordinary.”

    What the fuck? Is this a fucking joke? Who is this “Steve Chapman” and how did he get a job writing at an allegedly libertarian publication?

  45. This is all very well and good .. how come you don’t hold obama to those same standards

  46. congressional Republicans were so appalled by Bill Clinton’s illicit affair and brazen deceptions that they impeached him

    Crimes
    Bill Clinton was impeached for his crimes

    Slick Willy was impeached for the *crimes* of perjury and obstruction of justice, both of which he was guilty of. But Dems seem to like being ruled by criminals, as long as they have a D in front of their names.

    Why can’t you guys ever criticize Trump without lying?

  47. Not a word about Obama! When did Reason become a left wing rag totally ignoring Obama’s role in bringing this about?

    Remember that the Socialists hate that Nazi is the abbreviation for NAtional soZIalistische – National Socialist. The Nazi party’s full name is NAtional soZIalistische deutsche arbeiter partei – which literally translates from German to be the National Socialist German Workers’ Party…

    1. LifeStrategies: it seems by omission, “Reason” is furthering probama. Fortunately it is only a week and a half from our being nobama. Why would Socialists hate a simple historical colloquy? I thought they were attempting an “honorific” by inclusion of the President-elect with themselves (sarcasm).

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  50. At the risk of being labelled as “disagreeing with the basis of the article,” I must point out that I would rather have a ‘violation’ of what Mr Chapman calls ” certain long-standing norms meant to foster respect for the office, promote national cohesion and encourage democratic compromise,” than the alternative of “little respect for the country, promotion of national division, and ‘pen & cellphone’ tyranny.” As always, neither Mr. Chapman nor I, was consulted on how to manage the country (within Article II, especially Section 2), and I would assume he would agree that, for at least the previous four terms, haven’t always been complied.

  51. now that we know Steve has bought the drive by media narrative, and missed the poor jokes that sailed over his head ( no timing), his magical thinking is akin to a Berserkley proffessoriat… When you realize, Steve, that he has been poking your preconceived notions in the eye,..then come talk to us..

    He has more respect for the Office than you can imagine..dork..

  52. “Once, a leader who defended a Russian dictator while mocking U.S. intelligence professionals would have been pilloried as an appeaser, if not a traitor. ”
    Yes and that was a bad thing. Mocking US intelligence professionals is a vital service that needs to be done by this President. Because they are lying incompetent power-hungry sociopaths, and they were accusing the Russian dictator of things that he almost certainly didn’t do, and doing so for political ends.

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  54. Somehow I thought this article would be laudatory of the irreverence that Trump has for established norms.
    But the author played it the opposite way.

    Of course, who is going to be better prepared to drain the swamp?
    An an establishment respecting conformist, or a loud mouthed, gitter-dun and bull-headed demagogue?

  55. I can see what your saying… Raymond `s article is surprising, last week I bought a top of the range Acura from making $4608 this-past/month and-a little over, $10,000 this past month . with-out any question its the easiest work I’ve ever had . I began this five months/ago and almost straight away startad bringin in minimum $82 per-hr
    . Read more on this site…..
    ==================
    http://www.homejobs7.com

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