Free-Range Kids

Local Library Will Call the Cops If Parents Leave Their Kids Alone for 5 Minutes

Forget reading.

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Library
Rmarmion / Dreamstime

If you're a kid in Beaverton, Oregon, you may wonder why your mom never says, "Go to the library."

Maybe it's because mom has something else to do today other than watch you like a hawk. Here is the Beaverton Library's Rule #2:

…[T]he adult/caregiver must supervise the child during the entire library visit by keeping them within their line of sight. If a child under 10 years of age is unattended and an adult/responsible caregiver cannot be located within 5 minutes, library staff will call the Beaverton Police Department.

I guess if kids want to read, they've got their phones.

So a local mom wrote to me:

A program my son used to go to as dropoff now requires a parent to be with him. And definitely, in our town, the library is mostly for the preschool set. Don't they realize that after a certain point, not only do we not need to supervise their every activity but maybe we don't even want to? Why should I give up two hours on a Saturday, sitting in the library waiting, so my son can use a 3D printing program? Isn't it okay for us to have separate interests?

Apparently not. Here is the entire policy. Note that unreasonable safety concerns are once again undermining kid independence, as well as parents' ability to decide for themselves what age their children are capable of doing something on their own. This is how we get parents arrested for letting their kids play outside, or waiting a few minutes in the car. It's the bulletproof excuse that hijacks freedom.

BEAVERTON CITY LIBRARY

SAFE CHILD POLICY

Adopted by the Library Advisory Board, January 2006

Updated October 2015

Children of all ages are welcome in the library.

Doesn't sound that way. I went to the library by myself at age 9.

However, libraries are public buildings where the well-being of children left alone is a serious concern. The following policy has been established in order to create an environment of safety and to help keep our young patrons safe:

POLICY

  1. It is the responsibility of the accompanying adult/caregiver to ensure a child's appropriate behavior and adherence to the Rules for Use of the Beaverton City Library
  1. Children under 10 years of age must be accompanied by an adult/caregiver at all times.* This means the adult/caregiver must supervise the child during the entire library visit by keeping them within their line of sight. If a child under 10 years of age is unattended and an adult/responsible caregiver cannot be located within 5 minutes, library staff will call the Beaverton Police Department.
  1. When Library events require children to attend on their own, children shall be brought to the room immediately prior to the program and immediately met outside the room at the program's conclusion.
  1. Library staff is not responsible for the supervision of children in any area of the library at any time except during library programs where parents/caregivers do not attend.
  1. The Beaverton Police Department will be called for unattended minors at the time of Library closure.

And they added these, just to make it clear:

*The Oregon Revised Statutes:

163.545 Child neglect in the second degree.

(1) A person having custody or control of a child under 10 years of age commits the crime of child neglect in the second degree if, with criminal negligence, the person leaves the child unattended in or at any place for such period of time as may be likely to endanger the health or welfare of such child.

(2) Child neglect in the second degree is a Class A misdemeanor

The library seems to interpret kids left alone at the library as child endangerment.

I get that some children can be ill-behaved. But why punish all children who want to come to the library by making access taboo until they hit double digits? Teach, punish, or ban the kids who can't control themselves, and let the other kids come in and, you know, read.

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120 responses to “Local Library Will Call the Cops If Parents Leave Their Kids Alone for 5 Minutes

  1. And I’m going to guess that they’ll be totally surprised when someone gets shot.

    1. The only sure way to keep people from harm is to kill them.

      1. ARM THE LIBRARIANS!

        1. certainly would add some teeth to those “quiet” warnings.

        2. I assume the librarians’ guns will have silencers.

          1. I lol’ed out loud.

  2. Those public employees get paid either way and CYA is king. This policy is a foreseeable outcome of those incentives.

    1. What better way to make a gov check than to not have to deal with kids quietly reading.

      1. Yeah. Kids quietly reading. That’s the problem.
        If kids were quietly reading, the necessity of policies such as this wouldn’t even occur to anyone. Unfortunately, not every library exists in a “Leave it to Beaver” neighborhood.

      2. And btw, you can go to the best of neighborhoods, take a stroll through the library, and you’ll find very few kids sitting there reading. Playing video games? yeah. Reading, not so much.

    2. I’m a lazy government employee and I don’t feel like monitoring the patrons to make sure they aren’t raping little kids in the bathroom.

  3. Thinking is hard.

    1. and so is my Johnson!

  4. A lot of parents use libraries as form of babysitter. They figure it’s a safe space with staff around to protect to their child. That’s what the library is fighting against; parents shirking their duty onto public employees.

    1. Then they should demand public schools be shut down.

    2. Who cares as long as the kids are quiet. If the kids are not following the rules, then kick them out of the library.

      1. Who cares as long as the kids are quiet. If the kids are not following the rules, then kick them out of the library.

        Yup. More likely than not, if there’s a 7 or 8 year old acting up in the library, they probably have their own cell phone to call mommy to pick them up because the big bad librarian lady told them they can’t climb the bookshelves.

        1. Even when I was growing up, if there was a 7 or 8 year old in the library, either his parents were there in a different section or one of his older siblings were.

    3. I thought that that was part of the point of a public library. They do have, you know, a children’s section and everything. And under 10 is insane. By age 10 I had my own library card and was walking to the library by myself if I wanted to.

      If they are expecting baby sitting, that’s not appropriate. But if they leave kids who are capable of quietly looking at books alone, that seems like exactly what the library is for (putting aside whether public libraries should be a thing). This rule seems to say that you can’t even leave your kid in the children’s section while you go to other parts of the library.

      1. Yes, if you’re going to have a children’s section, surely it should be monitored to make sure it’s safe enough for an 8 year old to look at books alone.

        You can’t have one staff person standing around making sure creepy adults aren’t groping the children in the aisles?

        1. Not really necessary. Kids can yell.

        2. You people live in a fantasy world.

          So, in your local library, what do they do? Lock the kids in the children’s section? Maybe they put collars on them so that if they scream and yell, or begin to run they’ll get shocked? Unfortunately, librarians have to deal with reality. And most of the time, the reality is that kids who are in the library unattended, are left there by parents who have not done their job in the home, and as a result, will take any opportunity to get away from their own kids for awhile, leaving others to watch them and try to keep them under some semblance of control.

    4. So … the library shouldn’t be a safe space? Why not?

      There’s a difference between safe space for a 3 year old and safe space for an 8 year old. Most 8 year olds can walk without falling down and don’t put paperclips into light sockets.

    5. A lot of parents use libraries as form of babysitter.

      That thinking right there – that says you’re the sort of person who thinks its a parent’s duty to be in view of their kid 24/7 and never let the kid do anything without ‘supervision’.

      My parents never used the library as a babysitter. They figured I was safe enough in a group of kids (because no one is dropping their 5 year old off and leaving the library) and it was better we were in the library or poking around in the desert (HAH! Do you know how much shit you can find left-over that can be made to blow up?) than staring at a wall or robbing old ladies and getting into fights with other groups of kids.

      1. yeh, it’s all fine and dandy until some 8 year old brat starts running around like a monkey and screwing it up for all the well-behaved kids.

      2. “That thinking right there – that says you’re the sort of person who thinks its a parent’s duty to be in view of their kid 24/7 and never let the kid do anything without ‘supervision’.”

        The problem is, they don’t want the kids to be able to do things without supervision. They just want other people to provide the supervision.

  5. When I was younger, it was already noticeably harder to go out alone as a kid because of busy bodies. We are to the point where basically a kid is never to be unsupervised through to the age of 18.

    1. It sounds like you were born after 1980. In the 1960s and 70s I left in the morning and had to be home by sundown. No cell phones. My parents didn’t always know exactly where I was but had a general idea where I might be. If I was injured or something happened, an adult was glad to help and call my parents.

      There were more serial killers running around then too.

      Now we have helicopter parents, kids to dumb to handle being on their own, adults to scared to help kids in trouble and a millions laws and excuses to arrest kids and/or parents.

      All sorts of people trying to keep kids from being kids.

    2. We are to the point where basically a kid is never to be unsupervised through to the age of 18.

      And the ones who go to college are never to by unsupervised through the age of 22.

      1. And even then, they have Big Brother to monitor them on the internet and make sure nobody says anything mean to them.

      2. And the ones who go to college are never to by unsupervised through the age of 22.

        And the ones who go to college for East Asian Gender Studies are never to be unsupervised through the age of 30.

        1. The ones who go to East Asian Gender Studies like being monitored. How can we have social justice without the government monitoring our microaggressions?

    3. I’m glad I grew up when and where I did. I think I was 6 when I started walking downtown unaccompanied by adults to go to the store and buy candy. It’s still not too bad where I’m at. You still see kids around on their own a lot. But I’m not sure a couple of 6 year olds walking alone wouldn’t get called in by some busy-body.

      1. Walk downtown to buy candy? Why? When there are so many windowless vans with older gentlemen just GIVING it away to the kids!

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  7. I’m all for free range kids, but this seems to be a case of the library getting tired of a bunch of ill mannered children running wild, judging by the rules. Involving the po-po is overkill though. However, a lot of parents don’t believe their little tykes capable of bad behavior, so this may very well be a case of the library being totally fed up with providing free babysitting services.

    1. Exactly what I was thinking. More of an “annoying kids” policy than a “safe kids” one.

      1. That’s probably what it is, along w a desire to avoid political or legal consequences for judgmentally identifying certain kids or families as the troublemakers. So they have a rule they can enforce just as selectively, but with deniability, because nobody’s going to complain about not being kicked out; this way if they are kicked out, the law is on the side of the kickers-out.

        1. Why can’t you simply tell misbehaving children to leave? Why do you need a ‘time limit’ to find the adult and then CALL THE COPS?

          I’d been told to kick rocks in more than one place I was being a little shit in by myself (really, with a group of peers) as a child.

      2. So kick out all the kids just to be fair.

        See below post about the woman being prosecuted for selling homemade cevice on a Facebook cooking club.

        The law is the law, we’re just (selectively) enforcing it!

        1. In other words, “we’re not really going to enforce this if you’re kid behaves” quickly tuns into “we have to enforce this rule for everyone, because rules are rules” as soon as some library employee needs to justify his existance.

    2. The appropriate response to ill mannered children is to kick them out, not to adopt stupid rules for all kids who use the library.

      1. Exactly. This whole “We have to punish everybody because of the actions of a few” was asinine when I was in middle school and it’s asinine now.

        1. But the trouble is the few demanding due process, and due process being construed as pretty full legal process rather than an admin saying, this kid’s making noise, get outta here. And the due process demand might stand up because using the library is deemed a legal right, because it’s tax-funded in whole or part. Remember the guy in Morristown who had to be paid a big settlement for stinking in the library?

          1. Exactly. It’s not as easy as saying, “Behave yourself or get out.” There has to be a paper trail. Everything interaction has to be documented, and only then can one be banned. Of course, that won’t stop Mom from raising Cain, screaming about how her little Johnny is such an angel and would never do such a thing. It also won’t stop Mom from getting $$ in her eyes and filing a lawsuit.

        2. But by doing this, authority figures can exert social pressure on the miscreants to reform their behavior, and it’s too hard to find out who was actually acting up versus who wasn’t.

          /Actual argument one of my former teachers put forth to me when I argued that punishing an entire classroom did nothing but piss off the well-behaved students

          1. One of my teachers said roughly the same thing.

            I looked at the kid that was usually the trouble maker. He was already built like a high school linebacker. I was 4’10 and 80lbs and thought to myself “No one is going to tell Bluto to shut the fuck up.”

          2. Really, how many parents will know enough to find out which kids were misbehaving?
            People have jobs.

          3. Tell that former teacher that even the military has stopped doing that.

            1. And it probably isn’t a coincidence that we don’t win wars any more.

      2. Or ask the misbehaving tykes ‘would you like a smack?’. Children need more beatings.

  8. I used to be dropped off at the library for hours at a time. I’d just find a book, sit in a chair and read. It was much better than having to go shopping for clothes with my mother. But that was the 70s, when America was a lawless wasteland of molested children and Billy Beer.

    Of course, I’ve also seen the other side of this, “homeschooled” kids dropped off at the library before we even opened and picked up when the parents got off work. There was a core of 6 of them that somehow managed to fill their day reading magazines and sleeping.

    1. Yeah, but look how you turned out…

      1. It’s not the library’s fault I learned to weaponize a thesaurus.

        1. Weaponized Thesaurus….great band name.

      2. My boy is into the “Who will win?” series of children’s books. (He’s not a strong reader.) But I do believe a spinosaurus could beat a thesaurus. That’s some solid information.

    2. It was much better than having to go shopping for clothes with my mother.

      I’m guessing 50% you realizing it was ‘better’ than going clothes shopping with your mother and, after the embarrassing incident that got announced over the department store intercom, 50% her offering you the ‘better’ option of sitting at the library while she went shopping.

      1. Oh, she was glad to be rid of me. I was a fan of wandering off. I heard my name many times over the store PA.

        If she went shopping at night, I’d have her park under a streetlight and leave me in the car. It was a huge relief when she finally decided I was old enough to stay home alone.

    3. My mom would drop me off at the public library and go shopping. Admittedly, I was 3 and this was a bit young for dumping your kids in the library and taking off. I went looking for her one day and couldn’t find her, so I started crying and when she came back the library staff told her not to leave us in the library alone again. But they didn’t call the cops or anything. I just hung out at the reception desk for about 20 minutes until she returned.

    4. “homeschooled” kids dropped off at the library before we even opened and picked up when the parents got off work.

      If the kids behave and take care of themselves, what the fuck is wrong with that? There are way worse things they could be doing than hanging out at the library reading magazines.

  9. I was thinking it might be to prevent children running wild in the library but it looks like they’re pushing it as a safety issue. Screw these people.

  10. I wonder if they are going to call the cops or if this is just legal CYA for the very real problem of molestation of kids in libraries. Because it happens quite often, but the library board or the city takes care of it before it becomes too public.

    1. Is it a very real problem though or just a very blown out of proportion problem? I’d love to see the statistics, but it’s definitely a CYA move.

      1. I’ve only worked in one public library and my wife has worked in two. Probably heard of nine incidents altogether, ranging from a homeless guy masturbating into a book while staring at my wife, to a nude guy waiting in the bathroom for a kid to come in, and up to a child being digitally raped and forced to perform oral on a guy up in the stacks. Only the rape made the papers and it was not reported to be as bad as it really was.

        This, of course, is just the sex stuff. Assaults, harassment, vandalism…

        1. So obviously the solution is to kick out the children and not the child molestors.

          What happened to having a kids section that was separate and kids-only? Make sure the kids stay in the kids section and the adults stay in the adults section.

          1. What if I want a kid’s book?

          2. Make sure the kids stay in the kids section and the adults stay in the adults section.

            Why would you want to do that? I tried to check out my first book from the “adult section” (Jim Bouton’s Ball Four) when I was 8 in 1973. The librarian said no. Mom absolutely ripped her ass to pieces- After that, I was allowed to check out any book I wanted…

    2. Someone will get mad and do it because they can. Since they’re a public employee, they can’t be fired for “just following orders.”

    3. If the problem’s one of adults molesting of kids, then it’d seem you’d want to keep as many adults as possible out of the kiddie section. It’s probably mixture of adult-on-kid & kid-on-kid incidents, though.

      1. Chester does not agree with those policies.

    4. Yeah, the Library Board moves the offending Librarians to another Branch whenever there’s the slightest stink about inappropriate behavior.

  11. I would like for our local public library to be closed. Instead, I want my City to use my tax money (much less of it) to turn the lights on at our public parks and high school football field until 8 pm. DST reminds of this modest proposal. A little more play time and a little less ejucation. I am deplorable.

    1. ^This^ Public libraries are a waste of taxpayer money. The homeless people can find somewhere else to hang out.

      1. Like public parks and high school football fields with the lights on until 8pm.

  12. 1. You think if the issue were that the library wanted well behaved kids or wanted kids to behave they could communicate such, possibly even naming names, rather than having to run them all off under threat of police involvement.

    1. This assumes librarians not to be inarticulate busybody fucksticks.

    1. It would be a better world if it could be couched in behavioral terms, but that’s not actually effective as a practical matter. There are too many asshole parents for simply communicating to work, and all “naming names” does is get those assholes angry and shouting and calling City Hall and threatening lawsuits.

      An official safety policy lets you call the police every time some big asshole drops off their little asshole for free day care while they go shopping, while being able to tell the big asshole that no, we’re not ruining her day by persecuting her precious little Ritalin-crazed demon from the pits of Hell for no reason (the “no reason” being his loud tantrums and property destruction), oh no, we’re just looking out for his safety from predators, she doesn’t want her child kidnapped and molested, does she?

  13. Growing up, I often visited the local public libraries. From an early age, I went by myself and survived the streets of New York and horrifying people in NY Public Library. We also frequented the Museum of Natural History taking the subways by ourselves. To my knowledge, none of my friends were snatched by a perverted sex fiend. Child safety concerns are off the charts. Our children now have fewer options and far fewer friends to play with because of the over reaching concerns for their safety.

    1. What self-respecting adult is going to let someone snatch a kid who is yelling that they are being kidnapped?

      1. Wait until your six year old decides to deploy that because you told her it was time to leave the toy section.

        1. I told my kid, “say that again I will leave you here and never claim you again. Everything in your room will be given away”.

          Never had a problem after the kid’s first meltdown in a store.

          Any adult that wants to intervene when the kid is being a brat can have ’em. If an adult cannot tell the difference, they probably should not try and help.

        2. Wait until your six year old decides to deploy that

          That’s one of those “one time only” mistakes. The punishment would be so swift and severe that the kid would require a trigger warning for the word “kidnap.”

          1. Luckily I haven’t had this happen yet, just your normal full on temper tantrums. But there have been a few of those that I was worried about, mostly because of busybody know-it-alls.

            Maybe I should stop reading these articles, lol.

            1. My wife is pregnant with our first, and we’ve already had discussions about how to handle busybodies. I told her to say and do whatever she has to in order to put the busybody on the defensive. I’m most concerned about the “kid in a car” scenario for my wife, but the “daddy is a child molester” scenario is the one I’m most afraid of.

              1. If you face a SJW who brings in the law for nonsense, jump to operation destroy-the-other-person-before-they-destroy-you.

                If its your wife that is confronted by a SJW, tell her to tell the police that the SJW touched her and/or smacked her and/or threatened her and the child.

                If its you, tell the police that the SJW hit you and/or threatened you and your child.

                Always escalate what the person did to you or your wife, so that is what the police focus on.

                Its lying and childish but so are SJWs. In this case, two wrongs make sure you go home.

                1. operation destroy-the-other-person-before-they-destroy-you.

                  Yes, I see we’ve both been briefed on the same operation. I told my wife that she should immediately get on the phone with the cops and say the words “child molester” in the first sentence to the dispatcher. Get that on record as soon as possible, and keep saying it until the threat is gone. You’re in a million times better of a position if you call in a “false alarm” because you thought the person creeping around your car was a child molester than if the person calls the cops on you as a “neglectful” parent.

                  Also, the busybody can’t keep giving you crap about leaving the kid in the car when they’re trying to defend themselves from loud accusations of being a child molester.

    2. But why are child-alone safety concerns so high in the US now, but not before?

      http://www.citylab.com/commute…..nt/407590/

      There couldn’t possibly be a downside for children in multi-cultural societies … like a lowering of trust. That’s the price we pay. People are tribal and there’s only so much that can be done about it.

      1. But except in rural areas, where kids still have a lot more freedom, the US has been pretty multicultural for a long time. If lack of social trust because of too many “outsiders” is the problem, I would have expected the trend to have started earlier and been strongest in cities that have had lots of recent immigrants for over a century. The people driving the trend, who seem most concerned aren’t the people in cities full of immigrants, but well-off suburban parents from relatively safe and homogeneous places.

        1. I would have expected the trend to have started earlier and been strongest in cities that have had lots of recent immigrants for over a century.

          I don’t think that this is the correct metric. The problem isn’t “outsiders” in the foreign country sense, but “outsiders” in the moral/ideological sense. I’d trust a bunch of Somalis who were the same religion and ideology as me with my children before I’d trust my Bernie-worshipping New Ager childhood friends with them.

          I’m not sure how you would measure it, but I think the lack of trust would probably correlate with (and lag behind) ideological/religious commingling.

          1. Do most people really care or know what other people’s ideologies or religions are? It seems to me that what is going to change social perceptions is seeing people speaking different languages and displaying other more obvious cultural indicators. Slavic, Jewish and Southern European immigrants of the 20th century seemed pretty foreign and exotic at the time. And Catholicism was foreign and suspect to a lot of Americans earlier in the 20th century.

            Changing things about social trust probably plays a role, but I suspect it has at least as much to do with politics, culture divide and other internal cultural things like 24/7 news and social media where everyone hears about every bad thing that happens as it does with all the Mexicans and Muslims.

            1. Do most people really care or know what other people’s ideologies or religions are?

              No, but there are mechanisms for subconsciously shortcutting to “one of us” or “not one of us.” To be overly generic, I think those mechanisms are lumped into “a sense of community.”

              I suspect it has at least as much to do with politics, culture divide and other internal cultural things like 24/7 news and social media

              fair enough. I’ll agree with all of those things.

              1. “a sense of community.”

                That, I think, is the thing. We don’t have the sense of community we used to have (even if it was to some degree false at times in the past). I think most of that comes down to factors that can’t be neatly tied to hotbutton political issues. And maybe being more “multicultural” has something to do with it. But I think it is possible to have a sense of community in a culturally diverse group. Identity politics probably fuck’s it all up, like it does everything else.

      2. I try not to put politics into everything, but it seems to me that most of these stories dealing with “busbody fucksticks” (as mad.casual rightly called them) come from predominantly Democratic states/cities.

        I wonder if that’s true or if it’s just my own biases coming out.

        1. It would seem to be a common theme that libtards seem to be scared of everything- Guns, leaving kids alone, freedom, Liberty, property rights and free market.

          Nanny-Staters love providing the helicopter in helicopter parenting.

          1. Nanny-Staters love providing the helicopter in helicopter parenting.

            Agreed, with the added caveat that the modern Stupid Party grew from the same diseased Progressive root as the Evil Party. However, for whatever reason, the Stupid Party is a bit less afflicted with this particular strain of the disease.

  14. So kids from kindergarten through 5th grade are not capable of being left unsupervised at a library.

    If true, then that’s a total failure on the part of the parents.

    If not true, the library is full of shit.

    Let’s just blame everyone for good measure.

  15. For fuck’s sake…

    You wonder how you get a generation of pussified college students demanding safe spaces and trigger warnings? By conditioning their entire childhood to see themselves as victims who are incapable of taking care of themselves for even a few minutes without some parental figure around to supervise them.

    1. So you’re saying the plan of total dependence on the state is working.

  16. So they still have libraries, huh?

    1. Yes. It’s very important to spend money in the most anachronistic and wasteful manner. It would be much cheaper to get a shit ton of Nooks donated and set up a digital access system for library card holders. Then maybe have one real library building as a hub with special services. Instead of having lots of them.

  17. -1 nigger with a library card

    1. Throw ’em in prison. Then they’ll study.

  18. ??! What’s the point of a “dropoff” program if they can’t be, you know…?

  19. I’m going to speculate based on what I know about other libraries – sometimes unattended kids run around and make trouble, and the librarians want someone to take the tykes in hand and get them quiet.

    Disclaimer: I’m not saying get the police involved, just that this may not be a “stranger danger panic” situation but a “keep your kinds under control” situation.

    1. Like no child left behind classrooms, adults are scared to kick kids out of libraries who cannot follow the rules.

      You teach kids that they can get by without following the rules. Then you have voting adults who vote for Hillary who does not follow the rules.

      Hmm…. learning.

  20. Translation:

    We the library staff take absolutely no responsibility for creating a safe environment for your child. Please treat the library the same way you would treat a tavern or night club. Assume it’s full of sexual predators and miscreants, because we don’t fucking give a shit whether we’re running a place that is safe to kids to hang out.

  21. Also brilliant plan to decrease library attendance. As if public libraries are overwhelmed by popularity these days. Just put a sign outside saying “Fuck off”

    1. I have one of those in front of my house.

  22. I don’t know how to “solve” the problem of unattended kids treating the library as their personal playground, but I certainly am not a fan of calling in the cops.

    Maybe parents who leave their kids at the library can sign a form that they (parents) will pay a small fine of the kid has to be restrained by library staff?

    1. Maybe parents who leave their kids at the library can sign a form that they (parents) will pay a small fine of the kid has to be restrained by library staff?

      I think there are enough shitty parents that would happily absorb a $5/day fee for the babysitting. I think the solution is to be more creative. Require a library card for admission to the library. The card is free, and replacements are free unless your card was shredded by the librarian, then the card is $100. Then, for miscreant kids, you punish them like this: Strike 1: warning, Strike 2: the librarian shreds the kid’s card. Strike 3 and up: the librarian shreds the kid’s card and the card of whoever picks the kid up.

      If mommy and daddy are okay with paying $200 for each day Little Asshole goes to the library and mucks things up, I’m sure the library will put a plaque up in their honor for all the donations.

      1. “It’s Mrs. Moneybags and her 4 bratty kids! Our budget woes are solved!”

    2. It would be nice if the cops didn’t resort to charging parents with child neglect any time that they got called on an unattended child. In my day, the cops would just ask where your parents were and call the parents and take the kid home. We’ve got way too much overreaction on both ends. too many people who call the cops any time they see an unattended child, and too many cops who jump directly to criminal charges any time they get called.
      The library should be able to call the cops and have some expectation that the police will locate the parents and return the child to them with a minimum of fuss.
      Problem is there is no government authority these days that people can trust not to be overzealous assholes. Whether it’s CPS or the police, you just can’t call the cops and expect them not to make the situation worse.

      1. Problem is there is no government authority these days that people can trust not to be overzealous assholes.

        DING DING DING! WE HAVE A WINNER!

  23. If a child under 10 years of age is unattended and an adult/responsible caregiver cannot be located within 5 minutes, library staff will call the Beaverton Police Department.

    Oh, FFS! Did you look in the stall on the left?

  24. Christ man.

    I remember walking a mile and a half down a highway, over a highway overpass (or under it sometimes as the mood took us) across a major dry riverbed (the Santa Cruz – and sometimes we’d take an hour or more wandering around the bottom of *that*) to get to the local library.

    Then we’d wander over to the next door park which was half park and half desert area ‘declared’ part of the park but technically no different that the rest of the desert around the area (John F Kennedy Park – WTF anyone in South Tucson would name a park after him I don’t know).

    You can still see the alley and wash I used to cross to get to my elementary school (walking) in Google maps.

    Just imagine the area with the houses ending about a mile closer in than they are now and that’s what it was like in the ’80’s.

  25. This is common. It’s not that these public places don’t agree with you that pre-teens don’t need that level of supervision, for the most part. It’s because they fear – truly fear that the kids needing to be reined in will be disproportionately minority, and they may be accused of racism.
    Silly, isn’t it? Kids in any neighborhood will generally act similarly. Urban kids – Black or White – are generally more boisterous and physical in their behavior. Suburban kids generally conform their behavior to the norms of middle-class expectations.
    You may underestimate the level of FBCR – Fear of Being Called Racist – in your typical Leftist (which, I assume, constitute the politics of the average library employee).

  26. If you think of children as subhuman animals who really ought to be subjected to leash laws, and not just constant monitoring, then this makes perfect sense. If you think of children as small people who don’t yet know very much, OTOH, it’s absurd.

    I have long held that there are two fundamental views of children: That they are pets who can talk, or that they are small people who do not yet know very much. The wrong one is winning.

    David D. Friedman

  27. So a bum can sit in the library all day and watch porn but, a child can’t be left alone to explore his or her intellectual curiosity? That tells you all you need to know about the direction this country is headed.

  28. Sounds like the Beaverton Public Library needs to be defunded and shut down.

  29. Seriously? This is among the most ridiculous articles I’ve ever read. It’s clearly written by someone who doesn’t spend a lot of time in public libraries. Libraries are not day care centers and librarians are not baby sitters. When these unattended children get hurt, who will be held responsible? What will happen? The library, and its staff, will be sued. Is this what libertarianism has become? You want the right to be liberated from your children while you force others to care for them in your stead? Absurd.

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