Schools

12-Year-Old Suspended for a Year After Turning in Knife He Found—It Wasn't Even His

Is Coldwater Community Schools trying to teach kids never to report weapons to their teachers and counselors?

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Knife
Screenshot via WWMT.com

Twelve-year-old Kyler Davies found a knife in a leather case inside his backpack. He hadn't put it there—his mother bought the bag from Goodwill, and suspects it had been there all along.

Kyler was at school—Coldwater Community Schools in Branch County, Michigan—when he discovered the knife. He promptly told a counselor about it.

He was suspended for one full year.

School officials later decreased the duration of his suspension to 30 days, according to wwmt.com:

The issue wasn't just contained to the classroom; it also spilled over on to the football field. Davies tells us the school tried to keep her son from playing football.

"The school told me he could not go on their property, he could not play; he can't ride the bus with his team because it's a Coldwater bus," she said.

We spoke with Coldwater Rocket Football, the organization that runs the local football program. It is independent of the district and tells us the school wanted the rocket program to kick Kyler off the team, but they refused.

Emphasis mine.

The school is certainly going to extraordinary lengths to punish a child who did absolutely nothing wrong. On the contrary, he did the right thing. We want kids to feel comfortable talking to adults about difficult or dangerous circumstances. They should feel like they can trust their teachers and counselors.

Coldwater is sending the opposite message. The school is teaching children that if they find a knife in school, they should keep it to themselves or pass it off to someone else. Nobody wants to be suspended for weeks for something that wasn't their fault.

There's no upside to overreacting about weapons in schools. It's not as if failing to sufficiently punish Kyler is going to result in a sudden increase in knives appearing in backpacks. Coldwater officials have made a really stupid mistake here—no doubt thanks to the district's zero tolerance policy toward weapons.

NEXT: Feds Want to Support Automated Cars. Oh, Also: They Want Much More Regulatory Authority.

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  1. School officials later decreased the duration of his suspension to 30 days

    Because SOMEONE has to be punished for the presence of a knife on school grounds!

    1. Why not punish the knife?

      1. Because it hadn’t demonstrated agency by stabbing a bunch of people yet.

        1. Weapons don’t have agency dude. They only kill people in the passive voice.

          1. How do guns cause violence then, Hugh Akton? Huh?

            Now, when a cop’s weapon is involved in a subject becoming deceased, THEN passive voice may be used.

            1. Or, the subject expires while in custody.

          2. *Stuff* only has agency when it has resale value. Then it can be accused of committing a crime and you can arrest it and demand that it prove its innocence in the short time before you sell it off.

        2. Autonomous knives are not far behind autonomous vehicles. Who wants to chop onions when the knife will do it for you?

          1. I like cutting onions, it fools people into thinking I have empathy.

            *polishes his monocle with onion juice*

            1. That sucks man, what happened to your orphan?

              1. Right there polishing monocles next to chopped liver! They call him O.J. for short.

                Don’t tell me you name yours like people?

              2. Autonomous knife accident, or so I’m told. Can’t be bothered to follow the bloody trail.

          2. Autonomous knives are not far behind autonomous vehicles.

            + 1 Culture knife missile

      2. Because knives aren’t like guns — they don’t go off by themselves.

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    4. Or, perhaps, no one should be punished for having a knife on school grounds unless they are using it in an inappropriate or dangerous manner.

      When I come to power, all school children will be required to carry knives. Everyone should always have a knife and a lighter with them. I’m pretty sure I did pretty much every day in school from about 4th grade on. And I never stabbed anyone.

      1. And a pack of cigarettes too in case a nearby hobo needs to bum one.

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  2. Scolds will scold. Bullies bully.

  3. If you punish people for doing the right thing, guess what you get less of?

    1. People who believe in authority?

      1. God, i would hope so.

        1. $10 says people will blame racism.

    2. Hitler?

      1. God, i would hope so.

    3. People doing the right thing!

      Woo-hoo!

      1. God, i would hope so.

    4. I’m not entirely convinced he did the right thing.

      1. It may have been techinally the “right” thing to do… but it wasn’t the smart thing to do.

        1. Is following bad rules the right thing to do?

          I know some people think so.

          I suppose it isn’t necessarily obviously a bad rule, but unless they have had a lot of trouble with students attacking people with knives at school, I don’t think it’s necessary or good.

          1. The more I think about it, you’re right – it’s not the right thing to do. If nobody saw it in his bag or anything, it’s nobody’s business but his own. I thought he was caught with it, but it sounds like he just found it and volunteered the infomation. Stupid!

          2. It was probably the right thing to do. It wasn’t his knife, he probably didn’t want it; what else would he do, leave it on a park bench? The only other thing I can think of is he could return it to Good Will when he got home.

            Ironically, the kid might have thought, “what if I get caught with it though? They’ll never believe I just accidentally brought a knife to school, so the safe thing to do is just turn it in now.” That’s not unsound reasoning. Turns out he underestimated the stupidity of his school administrators.

            1. I’m having a hard time imagining a kid who doesn’t want a knife. I suppose it’s possible.

              You are certainly right in a way. A lot of people do think that way and I can’t hold it against them. And a reasonable person who doesn’t spend a lot of time reading about how innocent people get screwed over all the time would think that it was the thing to do. I just don’t find any particular virtue in following the rules because they are the rules.

            2. I would have either kept it or told my parents about it.

            3. I used to accidentally leave my pocket knives in my backpack all the time, after camping on the weekend, and not cleaning it out all the way. Luckily, I’d usually discover it in 1st period, then had orchestra 2nd period, and could leave it in my viola case for the rest of the day. Never got caught. It really helped that the instrument locker next to mine occasionally housed a 400 year old Stradivarius (A very talented girl who is in a symphony orchestra now, 2nd chair, had very good parents who sacrificed a lot for one of their two girls to become a star violinist). Needless to say, there was a lot of various drugs that the doggies caught onto in that locker, not mine.

  4. Last saturday my wife surprised me by taking me out to dinner and then to a Tampa Bay Rowdies (semi-pro soccer) game. We Ubered because the kids were staying the night and grandma’s and our alma mater (FSU) had just been ignominiously beaten. Anyhow, we get to the gate and they’re doing metal detector wanding. I have a pocket knife because I didn’t know I was going to a soccer game. I walked away from the gate, stuck the knife in my shoe, and went through security. Successfully. And my knife never once in that whole game jumped out and stabbed anyone. Fucking hoplophobes.

    1. About six months ago, I got caught by a courthouse baggage screener with a massive knife in my bag. I’d forgotten to take it our after completing an outing where I thought it might come in handy.

      The screener tossed the knife to me and said, “I don’t think so!”. He let me take it to my car in the parking lot instead of confiscating it, for which I am grateful.

      In the meantime, the attorneys were flashing their cards and bypassing everything.

      1. the attorneys were flashing their cards and bypassing everything.

        The most ridiculous aspect of courthouse security. Apparently when you are admitted to the bar you agree to not murder anyone in a courthouse.

      2. In 2003 I was going through security to enter the Reichstag in Berlin. They said, “you have three knives in your bag”, which was true: a leatherman, a corkscrew thing with a knife, and a pocketknife. I braced for the inevitable trouble but they just said they would hold my bag there and I could pick it up on my way out.

        1. You know who else entered the Reichstag in Berlin?

          1. Marinus van der Lubbe?

      3. In Houston, I went to the Dynamo game and they confiscated my knife, but held it for me until I came out.

      4. I got stopped once because I had an ID badge on a retractable string. They made me throw it out because it was potentially a choking weapon. Thankfully they did not make me throw out my shoelaces or belt…
        (They didn’t confiscate, but I didn’t think of hiding it in my shoe… or a planter…)

      5. Same thing happened to me at an Orioles game. My tiny Swiss Army knife posed a threat. The guy allowed me to bring it back to my car. How gracious. Cost me 30 minutes of my time.

      6. This past summer we made a trip to the east coast. My kids love doing the Junior Ranger programs at the National Parks/Monuments. We went to Independence Hall/Liberty. My Boy Scout forgot to take his pocketknife out of his pocket and only remembered right before being screened at the entrance to the Liberty Bell building. Going back to the car was unfeasible with it being blocks away and we were short on time. I explained to the screener and showed her the knife. She took the knife and showed it to one of the supervisors. She came back, gave it to me, and said ‘just keep it in your pocket’ and let us through. I could hear the knife calling to me the whole time to just start slashing, but I withstood the dark voice and it went away as soon as we exited.

      7. an outing where I thought it might come in handy

        I wanna hear more about this outing where a massive knife might come in handy.

        1. Hunting, fishing, fending off neighbors dogs while on a quite walk, using it to cut sticks so I can poke people with it or at least as a surveyors stake when I run out.

          Everything but the poking has actually happened

          1. “Everything but the poking has actually happened”
            That’s a shame, the poking is always my favorite part of an outing.

    2. These masturbation euphemisms are getting pretty complex.

    3. I remember the Rowdies from the old NASL days. Semi-pro now, huh.

      1. It may still be the same league, but I understand why these guys aren’t playing for Orlando FC. Its like high school all over again. Quit dribbling to the 6 yard box and then hoping to get a shot. Rip one from the 18 if you’re open. Especially against a goalie who isn’t in the big leagues. Make him make a save.

        1. I was watching NY Cosmos v Edmonton the other day. The Edmonton goalkeeper was probably better than most in MSL. I bet he won’t be there long.

          Also, the league is pro, not semi-pro.

      2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tampa_Bay_Rowdies explained it. New Rowdies, new NASL. I was confused too.

    4. In your shoe? It was probably made comatose by the smell.

    5. Wait a minute. Brett is Bad Bad Leroy Brown?

      1. I don’t prefer to carry in my shoe.

    6. When I went through screening at Greenville, they confiscated the very dangerous strawberry rhubarb jam in my carry on.

    7. Is that the same Tampa Bay Rowdies who used to play in the NASL (full pro)? Or just named after them?

      1. Apparently, they are technically full-pro and part of the NASL. They just don’t have as much talent since MLS.

      2. Apparently, they are technically full-pro and part of the NASL. They just don’t have as much talent since MLS.

    8. I think Lamar Jackson just scored again.

      1. You can tell because the FSU defense didn’t touch him.

  5. Robby, do you ever wonder if some of these aren’t Onion pieces that got stuck in the ‘telephone game’? This one is just plain hard to believe;
    Who knows, maybe we’ll get a budding libertarian out of it.

    1. Anymore I’m thinking the “teachable moments” libertarians hope for are in fact teaching people that government is better wielded than bludgeoned with.

      1. I believe that is the fundamental problem behind 99% of the problems we hear about. When coercive government is small (which it never stays), it intrudes into lives so little that most people are better off minding their own business, literally — but when government constantly gets in your face with permits, zoning, sign regulations, safety, environment, and a zillion other ways, it becomes pretty obvious that you can improve your life faster and easier by getting government to lean on your neighbors and competitors instead of you — whether that means finding rarely used regulations or creating new awful regulations doesn’t matter.

        I believe that if coercive government did not exist, that if there were no way to get coercive government to lean on your neighbors and competitors, people would get along much much better because, again literally, you could get ahead better by minding your own business.

        I believe that 99% of the crap we hear about, douchebags to the left, right, and center, is because government makes such a mess of our lives that it is just about impossible to take responsibility for our own lives.

        1. I believe that if coercive government did not exist, that if there were no way to get coercive government to lean on your neighbors and competitors, people would get along much much better because, again literally, you could get ahead better by minding your own business.

          Nah, people would just invent coercive government in that case. Most likely resembling gangs or organized crime syndicates to begin with.

          1. But they wouldn’t be monopolies. I assumed it was understood, that “coercive government” includes having a monopoly.

            1. Not to start with, anyway.

              Temperamentally and philosophically I’m pretty much an anarchist. But I’m not terribly optimistic about the chances of anarchy actually being possible to maintain over any long term.

              1. There’s a progression from kings to parliaments to federalism to more and more decentralized government. Maybe it will lead to anarchy someday.

                When society is just farmers and craftsmen, not even the rich have much stake in maintaining order; they remain rich by conquering others, and the conquered are replaced by new kings. Merchants have warehouses and ships and want more stability. Factories require yet more stability. In some ways, Hitler was an anachronism — WW I could still make some sense in territorial terms because societies were not yet so modernized that international trade and business ties could put a brake on war, but WW II was in part a reaction to the Great Depression which was made worse by the trade and tariff wars.

                And now with all the tech and international trade, such wars are unthinkable except by the insane. China can invade Tibet because there’s nothing to lose, but even Russia annexing the Crimea put a lot of stress on their economy. Middle Eastern wars are pretty primitive affairs only supported because outside powers throw money and weapons at them, and when you look at how little they’ve exported their terrorism to civilized societies, it’s pretty apparent there’s almost no support.

                I say that’s because modern society provides too much to tie people together, and there’s little interest in destroying it. I think it’s also part of the reason Trump and Hillary are getting so little traction and are so desperate.

              2. Then you’re an idiot. The state is maintained by a handful of stupid delusions that took root in the right places at the right times, were propagated by force successfully only because victims did not defend themselves, and have been perpetuated as a sort of bulimic cosmic accident ever since (the only alternative is the deliberate machinations of some hidden intelligence at odds with mankind.). It’s a difficult problem to overcome, but only because of the history, not because of anything inherent in the nature of man that makes him suck.

            2. There are other governments in the world and non governments constantly competing (albeit subtly) for monopolies on violence throughout much of the world. Governmental competition of course moves at a much slower pace and with a slower turnover than competition in retail or fast food.

              In any case, I think one needs to have a Rousseau level of naivety about the inherent nonviolence and goodness of the human race to the point of irrationality (aggression is often perfectly in accord with an individual’s rational self interest) to believe anarchy can be sustained without being summarily replaced by non-anarchy.

              1. The simplest proof that you are wrong is that anarchy has never been replaced by non-anarchy.

  6. You can always point to incidents like this to illustrate to progressives that their much-desired War on Guns will be a civil liberties shitshow, on par with the War on Drugs. Hell, even Salon recognizes that NYC’s Stop and Frisk policy was about gun control.

    1. You can “illustrate” all you want, but they won’t get the message.

    2. Most ardent gun-grabbers relish the opportunity to teach those backwards hillbilly gun owners a lesson.

      1. Deplorables. Please call us deplorables. It’s our new name. Stop referring to us as bakcwards hillbilly gun owners, please.

  7. School officials later decreased the duration of his suspension to 30 days…

    Way to get everyone worked up over nothing. See? The rulebook is nothing if not merciful and just.

  8. Twelve-year-old Kyler Davies

    What’s worse than naming our kid Skyler?

    -Kyler’s parents in 2002 probably.

    1. Let’s hope Kyler Davies is never accused of murder.

      “Objection, your honor. It’s pronounced KAHyler, as in Skyler.”

    2. The parents wanted to send a message to every other kid name Kyle out there that their son was better. That’s it, I’m naming my first future son Kylest.

      1. Fine, I am naming mine Overkyle.

      2. Why stop there, why not Obergruppenkyle?

        1. So, why not “Kyle Supreme”?

          It seems to have worked well in the Vermin Name War.

  9. There absolutely is an upside to overreacting to weapons in schools, for the lefties who run the schools — it reinforces the background belief among sheeple that weapons are something so horrible that nobody should ever go near them. Then those kids grow up to vote for gun control, safe spaces and “human rights” commissions to punish people for saying unapproved things.

    1. There absolutely is an upside to overreacting to weapons in schools, for the lefties who run the schools — it reinforces the background belief among sheeple that weapons are something so horrible that nobody only government agents should ever go near them.

      1. What are ex-cops, chopped liver?

  10. There’s no upside to overreacting about weapons in schools.

    Yes there is. It gives administrators an excuse to wield power and be cruel.

  11. Every met an education major? I remember those dumbfucks from college.

    1. Yup. Nothing like taking out 30-40k in college loans in order to get a job that will start you off around 20,000k per year. Recall that ‘Elementary Education’ is actually a degree plan. That’s right, you go to college in order to learn how to teach toddlers. Seems legit.

        1. You do know what ‘average’ means, yes? I take your point though, I’m probably guilty of a bit of cherry picking here.

          That being said, I was quoting what one of my high school teachers said their starting salary was in a town of 9,000 people in Texas. He started at 19,000k a year maybe two decades ago, give or take.

          1. Also, and this is somewhat unrelated, I’d be a lot more curious to see the top end and lower end of that spectrum as opposed to the average but I didn’t see a link to that data anywhere. I appreciate the effort at hard data though.

          2. Well, that was a town of 9k, *two decades ago*.

            Friend of mine started here a couple years ago teaching middle school at $32k a year and our town is 15k people.

            1. Plus it was Texas – they can’t afford to pay teachers much, they need that money for the football coach and the new stadium.

              1. See, now that’s interesting because according to the chart you provided Texas is one of the higher averages out there. What’s your explanation for that?

      1. A bigger problem with that is that you cant learn to teach. Teaching is a talent. It is like leadership. You either have it or you don’t.

        1. You’re confusing ‘teaching’ with ‘educating’. Teaching expects that the students will gain at least a limited mastery of the subject over the term. Educating means that you had the proper form as you spewed whatever the book says at the classroom – as long as the houseapes can pass the Standardized you’ve done your job.

        2. That’s a rather bold claim to make out of the blue. I’m not sure that’s true.

          1. I think he has it exactly reversed, actually, although there’s long been a disconnect between teaching methodology and theory between k-12 and college, which you’ll probably only learn in college but probably not even then.

            Virtually all public pre-college education is ‘banking’ theory education, and at one time college was the portion that was supposed to teach critical thinking but banking has penetrated the skull of public college just as thoroughly as pre-college at this point in most degree plans. It’s simply easier to measure it with standardized testing, since apparently outcomes are too difficult to measure despite colleges doing it all the time.

    2. As Acosmist loves to point out, most teachers aren’t education majors. Although I don’t know if that’s true for elementary school (it makes sense for high school, and maybe middle school, where subject knowledge is more important).

      However, the number of teachers who weren’t education majors or otherwise tracked through the education departments in college shrinks every year, and moreover the NEA/ATF and various governments have made it harder and harder for “outsiders” to become and stay teachers.

      Not to mention the explosion of administrators and other mandarins at schools, who have a career incentive to implement whatever dumbfuck ideas the education majors who aren’t teachers come up with.

      1. Actually, most are education majors and that is a big part of the problem. It’s hard to teach if you don’t have mastery of the subject matter.

    3. My stepbrother majored in education. Now he delivers mail and is heavily involved in the union.

      1. The postal worker Union?

    4. Ever met an education major?

      Yes. I. have.

      *slaps self across face, mumbles under breath about sticking it in crazy*

  12. The school is certainly going to extraordinary lengths to punish a child who did absolutely nothing wrong.

    Not only did he do nothing wrong, but based on the spirit of the school’s rules, he did everything right, so the retarded Rhesus monkeys that make up the school system have encouraged him and everyone else to do the wrong thing.

    Jesus we can’t tear the state down fast enough.

  13. Why do school administrators exist in “zero tolerance” schools? Replace the principal with a laptop. Just punch in the “crime” and let it spit out the punishment, no human input needed. It’d be a lot cheaper, and maybe they wouldn’t need to fleece the populace for more money like it looks like they’re trying to (information about a 2017 bond on their website).

    1. You make an excellent point, and one which I’ll keep for later conversation around the punchbowl. Thanks.

      If we’re hiring administrators for the judgement, then, yeah…

    2. That is a very good point. I grew up with one. He makes 125k a year overseeing a school of 300.

        1. Oh. It may be closer to 350. Still. It is not in a crime-ridden area, and it’s doubtful the place is littered with bad seeds.

      1. Did her house mysteriously burn down after the vice-principal got passed over?

    3. GIving credit where it is due, Deadspin’s Roger Goodell’s NFL Punishment Generator:

      Roger Goodell has carefully mulled this over, because he wants to make it right.

      You have been suspended 4 games because, in your words: “brought a knife to school”

    4. Someone still has to make the findings of fact. And snoop around in people’s business.

  14. This is what their school handbook says, by the way. No room for thought. I’m sure that’s all the school administrators are going to point to:

    State law prohibits students from possessing a firearm, knife, dagger, dirk, stiletto, or pocketknife that opens by a mechanical device, iron bar, brass knuckles, or other devices designed for or used with the intent to inflict bodily harm while in attendance at school, a school activity, or traveling to or from school.
    FIRST OFFENSE: Mandatory “Expulsion” from school and a referral to police.

    1. Except the article says the school tried to get the football team, that’s not affiliated with the school system, to kick the kid out. So that’s well beyond “hey we have to follow the letter of the policy.”

    2. I don’t see anything in there about knitting needles, just slip one of those bad boys into a hole in your pocket and you’re good to go I suppose.

      Or, wait, are they also including any object in existence if it’s used to inflict bodily harm? Does this, or does this not, mean that a clenched fist would automatically get you expelled and referred to police?

      Boy, that’s not an overly broad and poorly written handbook. I sure am glad they spent tons of taxpayer money to write that helpful guide. If we’re being honest though, they won’t give a fuck about what the handbook says, they’ll do what they want because they can.

      1. I’m sure it is deliberately over-broad, and of course it was poorly written – education majors and all.

    3. That’s exactly why I tell our ED folks to immediately flush any drugs that they find on a patient. If they keep it to give to the cops, they are in possession of it and are committing a felony.

      The only exception is medpot, which we treat like any other patient-supplied pharmaceutical – can’t have it in the hospital.

    4. Makes it sound like pocket knives that don’t open by a mechanical device (whatever that means) are OK.

      Including knives on the list of weapons seems stupid and shortsighted. Do they not have wood shop or cooking classes where the possession and use of knives is kind of important? Knives are tools more than weapons. And any heavy or pointy object can be a weapon.

      1. Is a hinge not a mechanical device? What about the springs on lockblades?

        1. Sure. Any folding knife is a mechanical device, strictly speaking.

          But the fact that they bothered to modify “pocket knife” that way suggests that there are types of pocket knives that are treated differently.

    5. Not going to leave any possibility that a nascent mass murderer is going to get another shot at infamy, nosiree Bob. You catch em and they our out for good.

      And the best part is you don’t even have to think about it. It’s all in the regs, black and white, for everyone to see and follow.

      So little ole knife and a used backpack? Out he goes.

      Butter knife in the back of a pickup truck on school lot [that fell out of a box when he helped his grandma move that weekend]? Out he goes.

      A fillet knife in a tackle box in a boys trunk, on the school property? Out he goes.

      Little girl brings a Hello Kitty bubble shooter to school? Mandatory suspension.

      Kindergarten kid chews his pop tart into shape of a Glock 19, suspension and mandatory counseling.

      There, now don’t you feel so much safer? This will make certain that no whack job with a real weapon is even going to think about bringing it to school with mens rea, because they will be too afraid they will get in trouble, have to go to counseling, and be suspended or even expelled!

      Of course, as everyone should know, this is really about covering the collective assess of school administrators so if something ever does happen, they can show how serious they were about “the problem” hard the tried…

      “God created idiots; this was for practice. Then he made school boards.” Samuel Clemens

    6. “referral to police” Just for a knife. I’ve had knives since I had pockets and when by some strange chance I forget mine I get withdrawls. poor kids now have a record for BS that will last forever.

    7. No mens rea?

  15. Zero tolerance. Sorry kid, but we’re going to need to shoot you in the head. We know the punishment doesn’t fit the crime, but if we used ethics to determine your punishment we would need to use ethics all the time. That takes time and effort, and well we just don’t give a flying fuck. *BLAM*

    -Progressive Educator

  16. On the contrary, he did the right thing.

    Except he didn’t actually do the right thing. The right thing would have been to just leave it there until he got home or toss it in a trash can. Maybe tell his parents about it.

    There’s no reason whatsoever to go to the school administrators and report a knife that you mistakenly brought to school. None. They don’t need to know. So they don’t know. Because they don’t need to know. Like some sort of James Bond thing.

    1. Oh, he did the “right” thing (ie, he followed the government’s rules), but has now learned the hard way that you never comply with the government’s rules unless the clear alternative (not possible alternatives) are far worse. Sorry, kid.

      1. He didn’t follow the government rules though.

        1. He was in possession of a lethal weapon.

        2. He didn’t leave the weapon in situ and go find a ‘responsible’ adult.

        Since #1 is a mandatory expulsion offense, there’s no reason for him to even bother with #2. Just keep calm and carry on. If they find nothing you can dispose of it later, if they find it you’re no worse off than if you had tattled on yourself.

        Its like making rape a capital offense – you reduce the incentive for the rapist to leave the victim alive.

        1. Twelve-year-old Kyler Davies found a knife in a leather case inside his backpack.

          In-situ was in his backpack. He could have abandoned his backpack and risked theft or possible violation of other government regulations about unattended backpacks. He was truly in a lose-lose situation through no fault of his own (assuming the reported details about the provenance of the knife are correct).

          His best option, as pointed out by others above, was to STFU and get rid of the knife once he got home; but most twelve year-olds don’t think that way, certainly not this one.

          1. Why get rid of a perfectly good knife & leather case once he got home?

            1. Sorry, “get rid of” as-in remove from backpack.

            2. Yeah, I was going to say that. Take the knife home and keep it if it’s not a piece of crap.

        2. Also, mens rea, he didn’t even know the thing was in there until he was trapped inside school grounds with no way out.

          1. Being on the rag is no excuse.

          2. Mens rea is a defense only if the statute specifically provides for it to be. There’s no option for a mens rea defense here. Strict liability.

        3. He should have taken it out where there are no witnesses, wiped his prints, and dropped it on the ground.

          1. Again, 12-yo. I would say that the restroom trashcan would have been a safer bet since it is possible that the campus is small and any “drop on the ground” location could have been potentially seen from one or more school windows.

            1. Dude, by the time I was twelve, I was well-acquainted with the basics of ditching evidence and covering up my misdeeds.

  17. OK, I’m not one to defend public school administrators, but since the knife was in the backpack they had no reasonable way of knowing how it got there. I blame the mother for not doing due diligence and checking out the backpack to make sure there was nothing in it which would cause those administrators to wet their pants, and I’m sorry that things have gotten to this state but there you have it.

    1. The lion’s share of the blame goes to the administrators for wetting their pants. “Oh, you’re voluntarily turning in a prohibited item you found? MANDATORY EXPULSION FOR YOU, MONSTER!”

      1. Particularly for gunning for a year and trying to get him kicked off his team. That’s just dickish.

  18. Once one of my Seamen brought me a knife she had snuck onboard and then later decided it wasn’t such a good idea to have it there.

    If I had taken it from here I’d have had to turn it in and report where I got it from and then she’d have been NJP’d.

    Instead I refused to take it, opened the door to the weatherdeck and glanced meaningfully at the liferail. She got the hint and jumped overboard.

    Not really: She tossed the knife over the side and the ‘problem’ was solved.

    1. Good story. Thanks for doing the right thing.

    2. Good story, better as a long-winded euphemism.

      1. He’s talking about his Seamen. It’s barely even euphemistic.

    3. Once one of my Seamen brought me a knife she had

      All she was trying to do was protect herself from the well-established rapey culture of the Navy.

      1. Sir, your recent actions – I have observed them closely.

    4. “Female seamen.” There, I said it.

      1. Not to be confused with female ejaculate, which, in my limited experience, has a greater range.

        1. I refuse to believe it really exists. Go on, test it: it’s just pee. She’s peeing all over your junk.

    5. Agammamon,

      Tell me when she showed you the knife, you at least said, “You can’t bring a weapon on board, this is a ship of war!!!”

      Tell me you at least said that…

      1. No, I believe he said “That’s not a knife,” then reached behind his back and pulled out a much larger knife, and then said, “This is a knife.”

        1. I could have pulled out my ‘work knife’ that was functionally equivalent to the contraband one (gravity instead of switch though).

          Her knife was ‘illegal’ because it was double sided and opened automatically. Mine was allowed because it was single sided and I was supposed to need both hands to open it – which rendered it effectively useless for work so we modified ours to open with a flick. Same blade lengths.

      2. ‘Fraid not.

        By that point I was sufficiently jaded re: rules made ‘for my safety’.

        1. OK, could the crew have pocket knives?

          1. Of course. For my rating its almost part of the uniform.

            But not ‘weapons’.

  19. I had a temporary job at the post office and one of the regulars was showing me the ropes and said, “if you ever see anything on the ground ? letters, money, ID badges ? don’t touch it.” He explained that anything you touch you are responsible for so don’t touch anything but the letters and boxes you’re assigned to. You take something out-of-place to a supervisor and they’ll expect you to know why it was there and where it came from. It’s not worth the hassle.

    The post office and public school administrations are interchangeable.

  20. I question these stories.

    On one hand, I can believe that administrators could be so unbelievably idiotic.

    On the other hand, parents will lie through their teeth to protect their lil angel.

    Me thinks the idiocy here is a bit too high for even the most moronic of school administrations, so I suspect the story isn’t exactly what the parents are peddling.

    1. Even if the ‘little angel’ brought the knife to school and had a change of heart he didn’t deserve a full-year suspension.

      And its not like the school is saying he didn’t bring the knife to their attention nor that they gave him that suspension ‘because that’s what the policy says’ nor that they didn’t try to get him kicked off the football team and not allow him to ride on their bus (that the team was using).

      1. From the report, it says he pulled it out of his bag in from of a counselor.
        Did he actively approach the counselor himself to turn it in?
        Or was he confronted about something and fessed up?

        Because the story doesn’t specify. the latter puts a bit of a different spin on it.

        Let’s try this story on:
        Students tell counselor that “Kyler has a knife in his bag” because he was bragging to all his friends about how he is gonna mess up John. Counselor confronts Kyler and Kyler confesses, turning over the knife. Kyler has been in trouble before and has had warnings in the past about violence. He’s a repeat offender and the administration is tired of it and throws the book at him”

        Parents plead a sob story to the local news to get some relief, but of course, the school can’t comment at all due to privacy laws.

        1. Just to clarify. That’s entirely hypothetic. Don’t know anything about this situation, but just theorizing how it may be different than is reported.

          1. So….just making shit up….got it.

            1. yeh….like the original article which no facts from anyone who was actually there.

        2. I guess. What it comes down to I think is how he turned the knife in. If he really did it entirely of his own accord, I’d say it would be appropriate to accept his explanation and let him off. And this is true that the parents are not a reliable source.

    2. Try interacting with school administrators….

      I have. And I can assure you – of the ones I have had significant interactions with – that this would be very likely for one of them, not likely for two of them, and possible for the other two.

      1. I have, plenty of times. My experience is that it always comes down to prior relations. Is the kid a good student or a troublemaker. I think it unlikely that a good student has the book thrown at him like this and suspect there is much more to the story.

  21. Little snitch dimed his own self out !

  22. I have nothing to add….

    …except to note that “Zero Tolerance” (one of the tags for this story) is also the name of a company which makes – you guessed it – = Knives

  23. In case you’re wondering, the sort of arrangement mentioned here for football teams for 12 YO is fairly common: They organize their league & age divisions on the basis of public school districts and grades, and the team is informally associated with, though legally separate from, the school. In some cases school grounds are used for practice or play.

  24. One of my co-workers gave two weeks notice and was let go on the spot. Oddly enough the next two people who left gave no notice.

    1. That is fairly common, but with two weeks of pay.

      If he didnt get that, that sucks.

  25. This literally happened to me in elementary school. Even then I knew it would be stupid to tell teachers. So I kept it in my backpack and didn’t tell anyone about it and brought it home at the end of the day. No problem. The key here is not to trust authority.

    1. Same here. Was nervous all day, though.

  26. “The school is teaching children that if they find a knife in school, they should keep it to themselves or pass it off to someone else.”

    Finally a public school is teaching something useful!

    1. Bear Odinson – is that you under a new handle?

      1. Could be, but those names are in a form common these days as heathen names. 1st name can be as here a mythologic figure or is derived from elements of nature or some such. 2nd name indicates family of a mythologic figure.

  27. I was in Coldwater with my friend Nancy in 2004 to see the magic show at the opera house that was in conjunction with the magician’s convention there. Kevin James (The Wizard of Odd) was the impresario of this one. I didn’t even know about the show when I went to visit Nancy. Nancy was living in the town Kevin James grew up in after being born in France: Jonesville. We heard mention of the show locally.

  28. Hey Reason, how about you report on a case, find out the facts instead of knee-jerk whining about how school officials are wrong without a doubt?

    Is it really that tough to look at more than one article as a source when you write? Try this one:
    http://www.thedailyreporter.co…..-to-school

    It says the kid’s mother admits that, unlike what you say, the kid took the knife out of his backpack in front of a counselor. He didn’t find it somewhere else unsupervised and then dutifully bring it to the counselor. Those are potentially very different situations. Did you ever stop to think for a second that maybe, just maybe, the kid intentionally brought the knife? Maybe he accidentally took it out in front of the counselor. Maybe not, maybe the school was wrong to suspend him, but we certainly don’t have the facts to come down on either side.

    Usually this website reasonably presents arguments. But all too often you propagandize by only presenting some of the facts, that support your agenda. That is not reason.

    1. I’m not sure how that makes the school’s reaction any less ridiculous or wrong. Unless there is some evidence he was intending to do something bad with the knife, he didn’t deserve to be punished at all.

    2. You are engaging in a great deal of speculation: “Maybe, just maybe, he intetionally brought the knife?” Really?

      No, they are not going to leave any possibility that a nascent mass murderer is going to get another shot at infamy, nosiree Bob. You catch em and they our out for good.

      And the best part is you don’t even have to think about it. It’s all in the regs, black and white, for everyone to see and follow.

      Actual examples:

      So little ole knife and a used backpack? Out he goes.

      Butter knife in the back of a pickup truck on school lot [that fell out of a box when he helped his grandma move that weekend]? Out he goes.

      A fillet knife in a tackle box in a boys trunk, on the school property? Out he goes.

      Little girl brings a Hello Kitty bubble shooter to school? Mandatory suspension.

      Kindergarten kid chews his pop tart into shape of a Glock 19, suspension and mandatory counseling.

      There, now don’t you feel so much safer? This will make certain that no whack job with a real weapon is even going to think about bringing it to school with mens rea, because they will be too afraid they will get in trouble, have to go to counseling, and be suspended or even expelled!

      Of course, as everyone should know, this is really about covering the collective assess of school administrators so if something ever does happen, they can show how serious they were about “the problem” hard the tried…

      “God created idiots; this was for practice. Then he made school boards.” Samuel Clemens

    3. From the link provided by jayt5: The mother, Denise Davies, did not reach out to The Daily Reporter or other local news outlets for comment or concern, but did seek out reporters from WWMT-TV of Kalamazoo to express her frustration.

      Ah, JT, my boy. This is what in the news business is called a “secondary source.” You see, lad, the mother did not actually speak to anyone at TDR, and they seem a bit petulant about having been bypassed in favor of the broadcast media in a nearby larger community. But, while we’re on the topic of petulance…

      You wrote: It says the kid’s mother admits that, unlike what you say, the kid took the knife out of his backpack in front of a counselor. He didn’t find it somewhere else unsupervised and then dutifully bring it to the counselor. Those are potentially very different situations.

      Very hard to get through your muddled prose (education major, JT?), but what was actually written above is:

      Twelve-year-old Kyler Davies found a knife in a leather case inside his backpack. He hadn’t put it there?his mother bought the bag from Goodwill, and suspects it had been there all along.

      Kyler was at school?Coldwater Community Schools in Branch County, Michigan?when he discovered the knife. He promptly told a counselor about it.

      How does that account substantively differ from the account provided by your secondary source?

      1. I am guessing that is a rhetorical question, as we already know the answer: it doesn’t, unless you want to engage in a great deal of speculation [“maybe, just maybe…”]

        I suspect what we are seeing is increased activity among progressive trolls, some of whom are actually paid to post their drivel [see “Barrier Breakers”].

        If we start questioning the authorities, it tends to undermine their cause.

        1. I was thinking school system employee or relative thereof. But, yeah, thanks.

      2. Read between the lines, man. The kid is obviously a superpredator.

        1. Did Hilldog ever respond to the “superpredator” term she coined 20 years ago? I’m thinking she miss-spoke on that one.

  29. I can tell this kid is warped just by looking at him.

  30. All I can think of is maybe these school administrators should be in charge of immigration.

  31. I think they taught a great life lesson. Never trust anyone in authority. This is how libertarians are made.

    1. Dare to dream.

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