Free-Range Kids

East Carolina University Offers 'Adulting Classes' for Fragile Students

Mental health services are strained-the kids just can't handle failure.

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ECU
Monika Adamczyk / Dreamstime

East Carolina University is offering a new program for its students: "Adulting."

The idea is to teach kids coping skills, including how to deal with the trauma of getting a "C" grade.

The school felt compelled to do this after a soaring number of students started overburdening the campus's existing mental health services—so much that ECU had to hire two new counselors.

According to the local paper, The Daily Reflector:

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Virginia Hardy presented the evidence in a report to the University Affairs Committee of ECU's Board of Trustees in July. According to the report, there were a record number of student conduct, Title IX and general Dean of Students cases in the 2014-15 academic year, and the university saw a spike in demand for counseling services, disability support services and the university's Behavioral Concerns and Care teams.

The adulting classes are designed to help students turn off the negative thoughts in their heads when something goes wrong, which seems like a great skill to have. For real. Wish I'd had that training as a college kids.

But the college also recognizes that the underlying problem seems to be that kids are growing up with very little exposure to failure. In part, this is because of the "Everybody gets a trophy" culture, but more intriguingly, it could also be because kids' exposure to social media means they are seeing a highlight reel of their friends' lives all the time. Not pictured are the breakups, the bad hair days, and the boredom of everyday life.

I suspect that another big part of the problem is this generation has grown up with almost no unsupervised time. From "Mommy & Me" music classes on up through travel soccer, they have always had adults on hand to cheer, solve, ferry, console, consult, and, when necessary, call the teacher. Or a lawyer.

My favorite Parents magazine article included this bit of advice to parents: Even if your child is old enough to stay home alone, never leave the premises when she is having a playdate. "You want to make sure that no one's feelings get too hurt if there's a squabble."

So I don't even blame parents for helicoptering. They have been instructed to do by a culture that has systematically undermined all our confidence in our kids. We have been told by the authorities that they simply aren't safe, emotionally or physically, without us at their side.

That's the generation arriving at college now, unable to cope with a rotten roommate, or rude remark. We raised them to depend on adults to solve their problems, so it's no surprise that that's exactly what they're doing.

Kudos to East Carolina for trying to help these young folks realize their own resilience, however ridiculous "adulting" classes sound. And double kudos for the fact the university is now considering how to get the feeder schools—elementary on up—to work on the same thing.

Or maybe the key is to not work on the same thing—and let the kids work it out themselves. Because when we let them, they can grow up to be adults.

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  1. So you intentionally turn young adults into infants and then create an ‘adulting’ program to fix it? Sounds like one hell of a racket. The person who thought that up has a bright future in DC.

    1. The college didn’t turn them into perma-children, their parents did that.

      But I doubt a class can fix that. The entire college experience used to be a way to fix it, but parents followed their children to college as well, or so poorly prepared them the children begged them to tag along.

      1. I agree with Lenore that, in context, this program isn’t ridiculous, although it sure looks like it when you don’t take the context into account. What the heck, lets trot out the newest member of Iron Law family:

        Meaning comes from context.

    2. AMERICA HAS LOST ITS TESTICLES! That is all.

  2. OMFG. I just can’t even with this shit.

    So what the fuck is a parent’s job nowadays? Being little Timmy’s chauffeur, maid, and cook?

    1. I don’t know about anyone else, but my job is to make sure that my kids don’t need me for anything but beer money by 18. Mostly by letting them try anything that won’t permanently injure or kill themselves or someone else. I want my kids to be able to hunt and eat these kids if Mad Max comes to pass.

      1. My son is hunting and eating these kids as we speak.

        He is 25 and already has an impressive stable of orphans.

    2. Being little Timmy’s chauffeur, maid, and cook?

      That, plus many parents these days want to be their child’s friend.

      ProTip: You can be their friend when they are adults. When they are children, you are their parent, not their friend. Pater Dean told me this was his approach, when we went from being pretty unhappy with each other when I was in high school, to being good friends while I was in college, and I think he’s right.

  3. Finally, some good news. With as little as I supervise my kids, they will grow up to be Khans in a world full of Chekovs.

    1. Too soon.

  4. Well they’ve identified the problem, but I don’t think there is much you can do about it at that age. They are already too old to have internalized how to handle such things.

    1. Agreed. Once someone has hit 18 their life is pretty much set. They will never learn or grow from that moment forward.

      1. Woah, that’s a little extreme. You can change. It’s just not with the same ease as a child does. Children are sponges. They soak up whatever you pour in. Adult can change, they’ve just got to put a hell of a lot of effort into it, and there is going to be a lot of failures along the way.

        1. Adult can change, they’ve just got to put a hell of a lot of effort into it, and there is going to be a lot of failures along the way.

          Not only that, but they have to want to change, and if they’ve always been able to get their way by pitching a fit and waiting for “mommy” to fix the problem, it’s gonna be really difficult to convince them that they need to change their ways. Kind of like how a lot of addicts don’t change their behavior until they hit rock bottom, the same is probably true for sheltered snowflakes.

          1. I think the kids who choose to take this course won’t be the kids that need it.

      2. As a former snowflake, I can tell you that’s inaccurate. It just takes a longer time, and said person has to want it. I lost a few years due to it, but after dropping out to mature a bit, I’m back on track and at 25 I’ll be getting my degree in geophysics next year. So we millennials are salvageable, I promise.

    2. Exactly. The good thing is, that my sons (junior and senior in high school) will be competing with these toddler adults for jobs. Should make it easier, as my sons are fairly capable and resilient. Heck, both have had the increasingly rare experience of summer jobs.

      1. Unfortunately, it’s more likely that once in the workforce, your sons will be singled out as racist, misogynistic, bigot bullies with all manner of lawsuits brought against them by the special snowflakes.

        1. This. The snowflakes will have HR on speed dial.

          1. Well, then….the toughened-up kids will just have to be directed to careers in HR!

            OK, I supposed I don’t really wish that on most of them.

            MOST of them.

  5. Not pictured are the breakups, the bad hair days, and the boredom of everyday life.

    This type of stuff represents the majority of my FB posts.

    1. Obviously, Lenore doesn’t tumblr, either.

    2. My simple solution: don’t read FB posts.
      Except the occasional cute animal video.

      1. I should clarify – this type of the stuff is the stuff I post about most. I almost never post “had a great day today! Everything went according to plan!”.

      2. Mrs. Dean filters her FB feed and shows me the funny animal videos.

        Unfortunately, she has a couple of British Stafford Terrier breeders in her feed, so we get pics and vids of every new litter. Which are cute as all get-out, but holy shit, two of the little barbarians is enough already.

  6. So I don’t even blame parents for helicoptering. They have been instructed to do by a culture that has systematically undermined all our confidence in our kids. We have been told by the authorities that they simply aren’t safe, emotionally or physically, without us at their side.

    Meh. While I acknowledge that societal pressure does make things more difficult, adults ultimately bear personal responsibility for their actions including parenting decisions.

    Kudos to Eastern Carolina for trying to help these young folks realize their own resilience, however ridiculous “adulting” classes sound. And double kudos for the fact the university is now considering how to get the feeder schools?elementary on up?to work on the same thing.

    Again, meh. ECU is a government school, and presumably the majority of those feeder schools are government schools as well. If you’re not ready for college, then you’re not ready for college – the taxpayers should not have to pay for remedial classes regardless of what created the need for said remediation. Not sure how I feel about k-12 government schools doing this; I’m always suspicious about more government overreach, particularly when other government agencies created this problem.

    1. Here’s a caveat to your first point: there are many cases where the parents don’t have much choice. When you live in busybody neighborhood, everyone is out to report you for negligence.

      1. I live in such a place, populated mostly by old people obsessed with who is parking in the right spaces. Back in April/May several younger families moved in with kids in the 10-15 range. It’s been a pretty entertaining summer so far.

        1. WTF are the “right” spaces? Is this like townhome condos with numbered spaces that belong to a particular unit?

          1. Get off my lawn! Don’t park in front of my house!

          2. Every unit has one space but there are also a lot of guest spots. These people are really concerned with who is using these guest spots (even though most them only have one car). For example, last week when I arrived home from work I had to park in a G spot way down from my condo. The next morning I had a note on my car telling me to use one closer to my unit, which I would have, had one been available.

            1. If they don’t sign the note, stick it up on a condo bulletin board or wherever with a notation that you ignore anonymous notes.

              1. you ignore anonymous notesassholes.

                FTFY

            2. LOL. They think you are deliberately parking as far as possible from your condo?

          3. I had a condo with a numbered space. But I also had a garage, so my space was for guests (or other residents guests parking in my space (it was prime location)). I looked into tearing it up and planting a garden, but apparently that was against HOA rules.

        2. I live in such a place, populated mostly by old people obsessed with who is parking in the right spaces. Back in April/May several younger families moved in with kids in the 10-15 range. It’s been a pretty entertaining summer so far.

          Man, I’d pay real money to watch that. Our neighbourhood is blessedly free of in-your-face busybodies, being populated instead by a variety of friendly scofflaws, ne’er-do-wells and the occasional realtor (but I repeat myself) who think that there’s no problem you can’t make even worse by calling the RCMP. I suspect the average resident of downtown Vancouver, if suddenly transported to Pitt Meadows, would have a nervous breakdown inside of a week.

      2. everyone is out to report you for negligence

        So, serious question:

        Is that true? Is EVERYONE out to report you for negligence or is that just the perception, like crime rates are up, abduction rates are up and there is a sex offender behind every tree?

        1. I don’t know if it’s necessarily true, but I have some suspicions. Based on RBS above, I’d bet there are many neighborhoods like that out there. From my personal experience, they aren’t all that way. My guess is that the busybody to uncaring neighbor ratio is inversely related to the urbanity of the area.

          1. That is, more rural equals more busybody.

            1. But more rural means nobody around to busybody… sure you don’t mean suburban?

            2. That is, more rural equals more busybody.

              As someone living in one of the most rural areas of the country, I’d claim exactly the opposite. Most everyone here laughs at helicopter parents. Wife subs at the local school and sees little difference between how the kids act/are given their heads here and how we acted and were treated as kids 40 years ago.

              1. Well there’s probably a suburban sweet spot then. I live on the outside of a big (for Mass) city. Last night while I was out walking I saw a pack of kids probably not more than six years old riding their bikes. No adults were in sight and nobody freaked out.

          2. My guess is that the busybody to uncaring neighbor ratio is inversely related to the urbanity of the area.

            I’d think it would be directly proportional to “suburbia-ness” of the area. E.g., lots of nosy busybodies in Suburbia Hell, not so much in the inner cities or out in the sticks.

          3. I’d say it’s more economics-driven. You get a bunch of upper-middle-class soccer moms on one cul de sac together, and boy howdy! You’re in big, big trouble.

            Get a bunch of lower-middle-class working parents in a run-down neighborhood, your kids can probably live relatively freely.

        2. The problem is it only takes one person to report you.

        3. I’ll speak for my little slice of Surburbia. While it isn’t “everyone” all it takes is one or two. Down the street from me is a stereotypical soccer mom type whose hobby seems to be reporting any child of any age walking in the neighborhood. She must have though the week Pokemon Go came out was like Christmas. She first announces on FB that some gaggle of ne’er-do-wells are out, then she calls the Sheriff if she sees them again. It’s ridiculous. My son isn’t old enough to walk, let alone walk unattended, but I’ve already had a couple run-ins with her because I call her out on the bullshit.

        4. Is EVERYONE out to report you for negligence

          It only takes one. And yeah, this is more of a suburban than a rural thing. Living in a rural area means theres a shitload of chores, and kids doing chores, with power tools, unsupervised.

      3. Like letting your kids play in the rain…

      4. While it is difficult you do have the choice to move. You also have the ability to check out the neighborhood in advance of your moving there. Realtors are generally good about hooking you up with neighborhood FB groups which give you an idea about whether the busybodies are feared or mocked (yeah, I know, FB…).

        Would a libertarian HOA be an oxymoron?

        1. Would a libertarian HOA be an oxymoron?

          Covenants:

          1. Leave your neighbors the fuck alone.

          Actually, not a terrible idea.

        2. HOAs are by definition voluntary, so they are libertarian at a high level.

          Now, in operation, they can be very non-live-and-let-live. But, affirmative consent to live under a non-live-and-let-live regime is libertarian, too.

          1. For existing communities, yes they are voluntary. Some new developments come with mandatory HOA membership – those are the ones that attract the worst sorts of busybodies and petty tyrants.

            1. Some new developments come with mandatory HOA membership

              Its still your decision to buy in the development, isn’t it? Or do they impose the HOA after the lots are sold?

        3. I just can’t imagine why anyone would willingly live in a place with an HOA.

          I own my home because I want to do what I want with it. If you can’t fill your yard with junk cars and old clothes dryers, then it’s not really yours.

          1. I represent a lot of them. Some are very much live-and-let live some are run like East Germany. Like right now this HOA keeps fining this guy for some ARB bullshit but the guy is selling his house. I mean, stop wasting money on me going back and forth with his attorney and just let him sell the house and be rid of him.

            1. They want the house repainted beige before he sells it to someone who likes purple shingles.

          2. I just can’t imagine why anyone would willingly live in a place with an HOA.

            I live in one. Its very small (we hold our annual meetings in a living room), so everybody gets to look their neighbor in the eye before voting, and has a very clear idea that’s what going around is gonna come around, fast and hard.

            We’ve actually reduced our dues by 20% over the last few years. Its not bad.

            1. I’m being a bit dramatic. My preference is to live where I can’t see my neighbors and they can’t see me. I could see an HOA being OK if it’s just about collecting trash and keeping the streets maintained, or things like that.

        4. One of the reasons I left Northern Virginia (DC burbs) to move back home to Pennsylvania was to escape HOA hell – those fucking busy bodies who are so concerned with everyone else. I once got fined for not planting grass seed – in December! Then there were the old folks a couple houses away, across the street, who could look out their bedroom window and see my shed! It was adjacent to the house and was even the same color, but I had not sought out the HOA’s pre-approval.

          I had never heard of a Home Owner’s Association until I moved down there.

  7. Speaking of after-school activities, this week offers some very strange libertarian moments.

    MOUNT VERNON ? The Satanic Temple of Seattle has asked the Mount Vernon School District for permission to start an after-school program at Centennial Elementary School.

    The After School Satan Club would be the first of its kind in the state, said Tarkus Claypool, campaign manager for the Satanic Temple of Seattle.

    “We’re not there to indoctrinate,” Claypool said. “Unless you think exposing (kids) to free thinking is indoctrination.”

    The good news? They asked for permission.

    1. I want kids, just so I can send them to that club.

      1. I want kids

        Just park your econoline PokeVan on the street and collect some!

    2. While Satanists are obnoxious they certainly do a good job of pissing off the right people, and making life tough for bureaucrats.

  8. This. Is. Awesome.

    I used to get depressed seeing shit like this every day, but no longer. Since it’s not going to change, best to embrace it. Just think of how easy it will be to herd the cupcakes into the world’s largest safe space. Then it will only take one person to hit the igniter.

    1. Just think of how easy it will be to herd the cupcakes into the world’s largest safe space.

      You know else liked to herd people into “safe spaces”…

  9. East Carolina University is offering a new program for its students: “Adulting.”

    The idea is to teach kids coping skills, including how to deal with the trauma of getting a “C” grade.

    The school felt compelled to do this after a soaring number of students started overburdening the campus’s existing mental health services?so much that ECU had to hire two new counselors.

    This all seems like a reasonable market response to something that’s a clear need.

    1. So the market is going to be everyone’s mommy and daddy.

      I’m sure that’ll work out swell

      1. Look, all I’m saying is, if your the Loco Parentis, and you’re blindsided with an entirely new phenomenon– a large group of young adults who have an unprecedented lack of simple coping skills, you’re gonna take steps.

        I’m not here to argue that the parents aren’t to blame.

        Let me put it another way. You’re an insurance company. You’re finding that your costs are going through the roof because there’s a population of people that constantly run to the doctor for vague maladies, most of which are probably psychosomatic– and these visits cost hundreds a pop. Or, you can send them to an acupuncturist which provides no actual medical care- but seems to satisfy a percentage of these crackpots, and it costs $20 a pop. Market response.

        1. Thing is, markets are limited by the preferences of the people who are buying and selling and children generally aren’t the best assessors of parenting. A company where short-term pleasure is given priority would do a hell of a lot better with kids than one with more discipline (or “adulting”, as the kids call it) — and evidently, that’s exactly what’s being provided by this adulting class: avoidance skills over actual ability to complete.

          Markets can’t replace good parenting, they can only provide services to people. Ultimately people are going to need to come to the table with a minimum level of adult coping skills to do well in markets.

        2. But if you object to that you can always (theoretically) choose another insurance company that discourages quackery and doesn’t coddle whiners. This is different because it’s government (CPS, cops, busybody teachers, legislators) creating the problem on the one hand, and then government spending even more of other people’s money to solve the problem it created.

          1. Agreed, though even then it’s hard to say that 18 years of shitty parenting can be overcome with a market solution, no matter how good.

            I think we both agree that we’re getting the worst of both worlds right now: government parenting.

            1. It takes a village to raise infant-adults.

          2. But if you object to that you can always (theoretically) choose another insurance company that discourages quackery and doesn’t coddle whiners.

            Mandated coverage.

            *drops microphone*

        3. OT to Paul: While that (acup[uncture as a cost-effective placebo) is indeed a market response, it’s hard to draw the line at just one type of “alternative medicine.” If you let the acupuncture people in, you have to let the naturopaths and homeopathists in; at some point you also have to pay to remedy the harm done by those quack treatments or by delaying the start of useful treatments once they admit the quackery isn’t working. And the more fat insurance money the quack industry gets, the more powerful it becomes. Quackery used to be the plaything of the idle rich, which was fine because they were using their own money and poor people couldn’t afford much quackery. Insurance and socialized medicine have turned this topsy-turvy. Also, it’s extremely disheartening to

          Insurance already has to pay for Christian Science “Practitioners” (prayer doctors) because of teh religunz.

          1. OT to tonio OT to me:

            I didn’t say I was on board with it, I merely know that’s why insurance companies started covering this. And too late, it’s already spread to all the other quacks. For those of you in the medical biz, the industry now actually has to segregate these areas between “evidence-based” to “non-evidence-based” care.

            Yes, we have an entire industry supposedly based on a hard science that now divides its care regimen between shit that can be proven to work, and shit there’s zero evidence works at all. But by god, it’s got to be covered.

            Oh, and again, no laws banning THAT treatment quackery because it maintains a political constituency.

            1. Thanks, Paul. Yeah, I knew it was getting bad.

              the industry now actually has to segregate these areas between “evidence-based” to “non-evidence-based” care

              That’s truly disheartening.

          2. I thought acupuncture did sort of work, just not for the reasons practitioners claim it does.

            I’m a bit torn on “alternative” medicine stuff. On the one hand, most practitioners are quacks and charlatans. But on the other hand, the placebo effect is real and if something makes you feel better, then in some sense it works. It may be the least unethical way to harness the power of the placebo effect. But I never feel great about just letting people be deceived (or deceiving themselves) like that.

            1. I thought acupuncture did sort of work, just not for the reasons practitioners claim it does.

              It’s relaxing to lie on a table and listen to Windham Hill CDs. Whatever benefits one gets from relaxing on a table and listening to Windham Hill music, is the benefit of acupuncture.

              The last study I read about was literally mis-characterized in the media, and caused the Seattle Times to quietly change their headline. The study found that ‘acupuncture’ AND fake acupuncture helps people quit smoking. Ie, “real” acupuncture and “fake” acupuncture performed on control groups had the same effect. Yet the media touted it as proof that acupuncture worked. Probably because there were a lot of journalists that wanted to justify that $25 a week visit.

            2. Placebo effect, Zeb. It’s a real thing. But you have to believe in the treatment for it to have any effect.

              1. I think that’s what I was saying, Tonio.

                Regarding acupuncture specifically, I thought some study had found that sticking little needles into people had some real pain relieving effect, but it really didn’t matter if they followed the traditional acupuncture stuff or did “sham acupuncture”. I could be misremembering or it could have been debunked.

  10. Or a lawyer.

    Last year I had a client involved in an interstate custody dispute. Number of time he returned my calls: 1 Number of times his mom returned my calls or called me: 60+

    That is just one example of dozens. I refuse to take anymore clients that let there parents do the job of the client. Of course, if mom wants to pay and STFU, that’s cool.

    1. A child custody case? So this guy is old enough to have a child of his own, yet his mommy is still doing all the heavy lifting for him?

      1. Perhaps the father was indifferent to visitation but the grandmother was heavily invested in that. My sympathies to you for doing family law; a friend does guardian ad litem work which is truly soul-sucking.

        1. Yeah, it’s brutal. Most of us develop pretty dark senses of humor.

  11. So I don’t even blame parents for helicoptering.

    Boy, I do.

    How blind does one have to be to realize this departure from the norm will have a detrimental effect on the child’s ability to deal with the real world?

    1. *in tears*

      People just don’t understand the pressures that a modern parent is under!

      1. I’m sure scarrymommy has several blog posts that can help.

    2. I just want my kid to like me! Why is that too much to ask?!?!

      *sobs*

    3. I routinely see parents agonizing on Facederp….absolutely agonizing…over sending their 8-12 year-olds to sleepaway camp.

      My parents were all like “WOOHOO!! She’s gone for two whole weeks!!!” They were always early in dropping me off at camp, and among the last ones to arrive for pickup.

      1. Shit, I’ve seen parents in the grocery store begging their kids to stop throwing a fit.

        -jcr

          1. Oops, there was supposed to be an arrow after the slap, but I forgot about html tagging.

            [slap] was how the white trash handled that back in the day. The more respectable folks would give the kid the “you’re getting a major spanking when we get home” look.

            1. [slap] was how the white trash handled that back in the day.

              Of course now that’s a really good way to get the cops and CPS called on you.

              1. I have a four year old and really, the hardest part of parenting so far is trying to figure out how the fuck to discipline my child in public.

                1. You might look into training collars for dogs. Get one that can fit around their torso under their clothes.

                  Just a thought.

      2. Sleepaway camp was a compromise deal I struck with my parents rather than be sent away to military boarding school. I think my mom threw a party every day I was gone.

        1. I dunno but I’ve been told…

        2. I can only imagine your letters home…

          1. * wrtech

            1. “Hello mother,
              Hello father.
              This is me at
              Camp salshfic”

        3. uhhh…this is the least surprising thing I have ever read on this board.

          seriously.

  12. The incredible mental fragility (real or imagined) of people in modern society has been a huge driver of current identity issues coming to the fore, especially when it comes to acceptance/non-discrimination.

    Previously, if you were outside the sexual mainstream you’d either be part of a counter-culture or undercover. Neither of these options really made demands on greater society and family, or legal demands on individuals — that is to say, either decision was one that was completely justifiable on an adult level of reasoning. The political goals of people outside the sexual mainstream were similarly mature: legalization and access to sexual assault laws, essentially.

    Now if you’re outside the sexual mainstream you’re a privileged part of the mainstream and expect to in effect be treated well by any and all social groups: an unrealistic and immature expectation. You’re coddled by one half of the political and social spectrum and your prestige is higher than that of the mainstream; this attracts dysfunctional people and the political goal has changed to forced association with any groups which have distaste or disagreements with those outside the sexual mainstream. This is an unrealistic and childish end goal; any adult already knows that you won’t be liked by everyone and that no one is obliged to like you simply because you exist.

    I suspect that the same is true for non-sexual SJW identity issues as well, if we bother to take a look.

    1. Immaculate Trouser can’t deal with coming in contact with people who live differently than him. Anyone who does live differently and fails to live up to his expectation to be completely invisible is being unrealistic and immature.

      1. LOL. I don’t give a shit what you are or who you fuck, but there are people who do care and it’s mature to have the ability to cope with that fact without having to involve Daddy Government.

      2. I think you misunderstood what TIT was saying.

        Or perhaps I did.

      3. If TIT is like me (and I think he is), he has no prob with eccentrics or non-mainstream people.

        He doesn’t like them shoving their preferences in his face and demanding special treatment just because they are different in some way.

    2. Subculture, not counter-culture. /nitpick

      And do remember that many people stepped off the movement bus when marriage equality was achieved.

      1. Both nitpicks are completely valid, thanks.

        Like I said, probably some good parallels to be drawn with the other identitarian movements that have recently fallen under the SJW umbrella.

      2. Polygamists don’t have marriage equality.

        Which I think illustrates the point that most subcultures aren’t interested in equality. They just want whatever the fuck they happen to want that week.

        Looking forward to the articles on the end of domestic partnerships.

        1. Yes, you are correct. Oversight, not intentional, but yes that plays into your second paragraph. FWIW I’ve always held that legitimizing polygamy was inevitable in light of same sex marriage equality.

  13. Oh, neat: a class on effective adultery.

    1. [narrows gaze at newcomer]

      This honor is rarely bestowed upon noobs or drivebys.

      1. But that one was well deserved.

  14. The adulting classes are designed to help students turn off the negative thoughts in their heads when something goes wrong

    I hope that’s not what they’re really doing. To simply “turn off the negative thoughts” may prevent students from learning the lessons that are taught when something goes wrong.

    Unfortunately our society has adopted the notion that reactions like anger or sadness or grief are “negative” and therefore to be avoided or shut off. In fact they’re just as necessary as happiness to being a complete human being. Anger and disappointment can be great motivators if you understand how to use them as such.

    1. Agreed

    2. “The adulting classes are designed to help students turn off the negative thoughts in their heads when something goes wrong”

      Like when you end up regretting a sexual encounter? RAPE APOLOGIST!!

    3. Anger and disappointment can be great motivators if you understand how to use them as such.

      Which is something that most fully functioning adults are capable of.

    4. Not that ECU is necessarily a good example, but at top schools it’s important that people learn to deal with the fact that they are in the bottom third of the top 10%.

    5. My grandson has a milder form of what they label autism that results in him getting very frustrated and angry when things don’t go his way. I’ve told him (and his siblings) that I understand if he’s angry, but he may not throws things or hit people. No violence. Be angry, then get over it.

  15. It would be cheaper to fail the snowflakes and suggest they come back when they mature. Like back in the olden days

    1. No, start kicking out the snowflakes and you’ll be looking at a busted business model. You need their tuition more than you need them to grow the fuck up already.

    2. Universities would be shell operations if all of them did it the same way (well, maybe Caltech would be an exception)

  16. Remember kids, when the Zombies/Robots/Mon’Gorians come (and they will), you don’t have to be the fastest or the quickest with the machete. Just put these snowflakes between you and Enemy and the Wasteland’s your’s to own.

    1. Something to that.

      Imagine the advantage the kids who were taught to deal with adversity are going to have over their peers. Lions among sheep.

      1. They’ll offer the world ORDER!

    2. Totally this.

  17. I’m hoping “How’s your adulting class going?” is the new pejorative that takes the place of “riding the short bus”.

  18. I used councilors a few times in college because as I understood it they were a resource there for us. I mostly went there to talk about what classes I need to meet graduation requirements and also too sort out loan issues, dropping classes, things like that.

    My favorite memory of discussing my troubled mind though happened with a University of Minnesota councilor and involved me explaining how I choose philosophy as my major because I had the desire to be the best man I could be (especially after the self-evident realization that I had little honor to cling to); and I thought study of philosophy was the best vehicle to meet my desired ends. But that I also wanted to better understand myself, and through reflection identify my own failings and moreover address how to better my self-realized issues.

    The dialogue is fuzzy to the memory, but as I recall it she basically said that was the dumbest shit she’s ever heard and one cannot self-diagnose themselves, address their own issues for their betterment without outside aid, she recommend I reach out to a mental health psychologist… You can’t talk to these people like people — doctors, councilors, statists on a power trip always sending one to the next bureaucrat down the hall.

  19. East Carolina University is offering a new program for its students: “Adulting.”

    They should have called it “Harden the Fuck Up 101.”

    1. The masturbation euphemisms are getting downright aggressive

    2. Grow the Fuck Up 101.

      1. More abstract. Still a euphemism.

  20. I remember my kids getting participation trophies. You know, like kindergarten. By third grade, in soccer at least, there was a lot of competition for the travel teams. Are there really towns where middle school kids play in leagues without keeping score or where everyone gets a trophy? Seems unlikely to me. In which case, this just seems like a lazy made up line.

  21. I remember my kids getting participation trophies. You know, like kindergarten. By third grade, in soccer at least, there was a lot of competition for the travel teams. Are there really towns where middle school kids play in leagues without keeping score or where everyone gets a trophy? Seems unlikely to me. In which case, this just seems like a lazy made up line.

  22. I remember my kids getting participation trophies. You know, like kindergarten. By third grade, in soccer at least, there was a lot of competition for the travel teams. Are there really towns where middle school kids play in leagues without keeping score or where everyone gets a trophy? Seems unlikely to me. In which case, this just seems like a lazy made up line.

    1. You get a participation trophy for posting three times!

    2. I think the squirrels deserve a trophy.

  23. Point 1. When we play games (board, card, etc) with our 6yo, we play for real (after appropriate training period). And being 6 she should not be too hard to beat.

    Point 2. The depressing thing is she actually, legitimately wins. Often. So, I think we are teaching me how to deal with failure more than her.

    (she ALMOST, skunked me in Cribbage…THANK GOD I got a good hand at the end.)

  24. This generation has grown up being trained that they are to do nothing for themselves. Have a problem? Find an adult. Even when they are adults, it continues. Always run to someone else to defend you or fix your life.

    They need $15 an hour to live on, so they demand that the politicians make their boss give them a raise. I’ve told people to to apply for a job that pays $15/hr. “Oh, there aren’t any” or “What if I don’t qualify?” Then skill up. Get off your ass.

    It’s always run to a 3rd party to get the 2nd party to treat them the way they want. You can only control yourself – quit trying to control other people. It won’t work, you’ll only piss everyone off and you’ll be miserable as fuck.

    1. Finding people that know better than you about how to fix a problem is absolutely the right thing to do. Screaming like a child because nobody can or wants to help you is an entirely different thing.

  25. But that mom in the pic is real cute.

  26. I feel fortunate. Back in the 1960s in a suburb of Chicago, we just left the house in the morning and came home when we were hungry or bleeding. We got in fights and parents did not intervene. If we wanted to play a sport, we had to find our own group and organize ourselves. I could go as far as my bike would take me or as far as I could figure out the buses. I started part-time work at 13 and was able to pay for all my extras like fireworks, sci-fi novels, movies.
    As a parent, I pushed my kids to solve their own problems. Such a sad absurd situation.
    Why a sudden spike in mental health issues at this school? Publicity about safe spaces and rape culture and protests about how awful the uni is. Suddenly a little normal stress is a crisis for people with no coping skills because they’ve been given permission to be crazy.

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