Brickbats

Brickbat: You Finished with That?

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pregnancy
redgular / Pixabay

Jordan Thiering will be taking her placenta home with her and eating it after she gives birth. But she had to fight the Mississippi Department of Health for the right to do so. The department requires a court order before it will allow mothers to have their placentas.

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  1. Someone broke the rule ‘,never fuck a crazy chick’.

    1. My maternal grandfather’s occupation was a butcher; I recall him and his buddy drinking the still warm blood of the pig they’ve just slaughtered. Otherwise the old man was a thoroughly mellow fellow.

      There’s no accounting for taste.

      1. I don’t think this is about taste,this is some fad diet or medicine craze.Heck,I’ve ate fried pork brains when I was younger,and raw oysters.I draw the line at human parts .

      2. “There’s no accounting for taste.”

        But we’re not discussing if women have good taste, we’re discussing if women taste good.

  2. It is regrettable how many times that I, as a libertarian, have to say “no, the government shouldn’t prohibit this disgusting thing that some whacko wants to do”.

    -jcr

  3. Meh. This should be up to the hospital (I don’t know of very many that won’t provide the placenta after delivery when prior request is made): If one is using hospital property, the hospital gets final say so.

    Otherwise, rent a midwife and have a home birth, then grill, flambe’, or dessicate and pill the placenta to mommy’s little heart’s content.

    With the exception of certain difficult births where pathology would need to examine, document, and keep the placenta (this is moreso satisfying internal protocols for insurance providers), I can’t think of any legitimate medical reason contraindicating scarfing down some placenta.

    Hell, Andrew Zimmern routinely eats *FAR* more disgusting menu items, to say nothing of the show, “Fear Factor,” of yore.

    1. Zimmerm eats some nasty stuff. His show also shows how ,in many parts of the would,people have eat what ever they find near by.Some are still hunter gatherers.

    2. Belated welcome back, Groove. You were missed.

      Meh. This should be up to the hospital (I don’t know of very many that won’t provide the placenta after delivery when prior request is made): If one is using hospital property, the hospital gets final say so.

      I don’t see how the hospital (or the government via court order) should have any claim over a woman’s placenta.

      IIRC, when my daughter was born, they asked us if we wanted it.

      1. Thank you. 🙂

        I don’t see how the hospital (or the government via court order) should have any claim over a woman’s placenta.

        Then don’t use the hospital. Have a home birth and do it yourself to your heart’s content. While you are at my hospital, under my care, or my wife’s for that matter, we get say so (our skills and our liability). We own our labour, no? We do our best for both our patients’ needs, wants, and requests, and balance that with our personal and professional liabilities (we are both employed at a private hospital – the whole reason I came to UKR in the first place). If there is a medical need to keep the placenta, it’s ours.

        I explained why. The reason why we keep many organs, like tonsils, gall bladders, tumors, and other diseased/infected organs, is to justify to both insurance companies (Gov and Private) that the surgery took place (insurance fraud is a big, big NO NO – unless you are the type of libertarian that views fraud as “comparative advantage” and a “state of mind”), and also to send it off to pathology to verify our DX, and part of the “routine audit” to confirm the surgery was justified (this is also true of local medical authorities, like the Ministry of Health).

        As I often say, “Don’t like how I removed your gall bladder, you’re free to do it yourself if you think you can do better.”

        IIRC, when my daughter was born, they asked us if we wanted it.

        Excellent. That’s their policy. I’m not seeing a problem here.

        1. Groove, to whom does the placenta belong?

          Do patients at you hospital contractually forfeit the organs post-op?

          1. Groove, to whom does the placenta belong?

            If there is no medical need for the provider to keep it, the patient; when prior arrangements are made for whatever reason, barring liability policy, it will be honoured. I have made this abundantly clear.

            If the attitude is, “IT’S MINE NO MATTER WHAT YOU SAY YOU STATIST FUCKING PIECE OF SHIT!!! MINE MINE MINE MINE YOU GRUBBY ASSHOLE! *stamps feet*”, please, do us both a favour and just do it yourself, and leave us out of it. My wife and I are not slaves to the patients’ every last little whim.

            The patient has the right to request as per hospital policies, but are not always right…

            Do patients at you hospital contractually forfeit the organs post-op?

            Yes, it’s in the print you are someone legally on your behalf signs granting us permission to treat you.

            If I perform a surgery on you, that is more paperwork and treatment agreements. And yes, it’s in black and white, at the facilities discretion. You, of course have the right to refuse, and at this point in my life and career, l’ll simply let you croak if you do it yourself and you fuck it up.

            1. Whoa, Doc!

              Why the apparent apoplexy?

              Yes, I may be an anarcho-Rothbardian fanatic, but I posed my questions because I don’t have any experience or knowledge of such matters and I was curious about your hospital’s policy.

              Yes, the customer is not always right.

              1. In that case, I’m sorry Libertymike, I truly apologise to you (I remember you are somewhat…leery…of allopathic medicine) for the kneejerk reaction.

                I am just tired of the SJW attitude these days; it’s made my very bitter and sad to see. Having been nearly shot in Donets’k, let’s just say I value my and family’s autonomy to the point of extreme. I took the question in the tone of Gay Nazi Cakes, meaning, “You *WILL* do what I say, and you *WILL* be made to care!”

                1. No need to apologize.

                  I completely understand your frustration with the attitude of some patients you encounter in that I have never bought “the customer is always right” narrative. If you have a patient with the SWJ attitude…..better you than me!

                  You are right about me leeriness of allopathy – its taken on a certain comic life of its own around here (thanks to Warty). But that leeriness does not mean I do not respect your intellectual bona fides or anything – it just means that vaccines suck 🙂

                  1. If you have a patient with the SWJ attitude…..better you than me!

                    It’s not the patients; they are all (mostly) self-paying clients who have reasonable expectations of what we can actually do. It’s really nice arrangement, and our prices are competitive.

                    “Teh SJW attitude,” and, “Gay Nazi Cakes,” is in regard to a few editors around here these days and a sizeable segment of the Teh Commentariat. There are a few, and I swear to God Himself, if I and my wife were at a Reason cocktailz parteez! and one of those few was choking on a chicken wing or some other hors d’oeuvres, we wouldn’t intervene. No matter how much money you threw at at us or how much your better half begs.

                    Those few can do it their damn selves.

                    it just means that vaccines suck 🙂

                    Oh Sod, mike! SMDH….

                    My kids will turn out perfectly healthy, and they have been properly VAXed (in fact, we administered ’em ourselves).

                    1. Groove, if you were at such a party, and Nick or Robby or ENB or Virginia P. or Matt were choking on a chicken wing and died, and you did not intervene and were subsequently sued by the deceased’s estate (assuming the party was held in a state that permitted a cause of action predicated upon a failure to rescue or where the estate was seeking to make new law), I would represent you, pro bono.

                    2. Virginia P. and Matt (barely) would be spared. The rest…

        2. I do understand the reasons you’ve described – it just seems to me that default position for something such as this (routine childbirth) should be to respect the property rights of the patient (barring a reason to suspect a public health issue). Surely you don’t need the placenta to prove that a child was born in your hospital.

          In my view, if I take my car to have the tires changed, my old tires should not automatically become the property of the mechanic. “Sorry buddy you’re gonna need a court order to take those old tires home, I need them to prove that I did the work”
          Or if I hire a contractor for a kitchen remodel, or anything else, I shouldn’t have to sue to get my original property back.

          Of course, the terms should be discussed beforehand (which they seem to have been in this case) I think we can agree on that…. it just rubs me the wrong way that it would require a court order for this.

          Anyway, glad to see your posts again Doc. =)

          1. Good. When you say, “default,” you mean, “automatically,”; I’ll say the same thing I said to Libertymike:

            If there is no medical need for the provider to keep it, the patient; when prior arrangements are made for whatever reason, barring liability policy, it will be honoured. I have made this abundantly clear.

            As I said, just about any hospital, and this is key, has prior knowledge that you want the placenta, barring pathology reasons for retaining custody – to which you agreed in writing as a condition of treatment permission – they will pack it up in a biohazard bag or bucket and send you on your merry way.

            The birth certificate is the proof of birth; that’s why L&D issues them.

            Don’t compare mechanics to surgeons, please, they don;t have anywhere near my liability; If they have in their paperwork, signage, or orally, “We keep the old tires as a condition of service.” too bad. Tires are theirs.

            As I said initially, A court order is unnecessary: The court here is preventing the hospital giving the mom the placenta on their own accord, according to the article.

      2. “IIRC, when my daughter was born, they asked us if we wanted it.”

        I guess each hospital is different.
        At my hospital, they just assumed we wanted my daughter.

    3. Andrew Zimmern wins the prize the day he eats his *own* balls.

  4. “It is not like it just comes out of me and I start eating it,” she said. “But they encapsulate it. So that means they dehydrate it, grind it up and put it in capsules just like a multivitamin.”

    Sounds like drugs to me. DEA, GET HER!

    1. Fist of Encapsulate.

      1. fist of desiccate? Sereiously?

        1. correct number of syllables works better than matching the first letter, this round goes to Radioactive.

  5. More of the Worship of Primitive Wisdom that is so fashionable. And retarded.

    Got news for you. Primitives are primitive because they’re primitive. If they were advanced enough to be worth listening to, they’d be modern.

    That said, yeah, “no, the government shouldn’t prohibit this disgusting thing that some whacko wants to do”, as John C. Randolph put it.

    1. The emphasis should be on the latter, not the former.

      1. Damn the lack of edit buttons, anyway. The italics were in the third “primitive” of the second line, and the quote from JCR.

    2. SEVEN ANCIENT GRAINS!

      I always loved that tag on cereal.

      As if grains became modern along the way with their own Industrial Revolution and all that.

      1. As if grains became modern along the way with their own Industrial Revolution and all that.

        Well, yes, actually. Human cultivation has altered a lot of veggies from their original, “primitive” or “wild” forms.

  6. What’s the big deal, my Nonna used to make a nice firm placenta loaf every sunday.

  7. How is it prepared?

    Placenta oven and roast for 90 minutes at 325.

  8. “It is not like it just comes out of me and I start eating it,” she said. “But they encapsulate it. So that means they dehydrate it, grind it up and put it in capsules just like a multivitamin.”

    Why the distinction, given your right to your placenta? Sheesh, run it through a blender with some papaya and slug it down.

  9. She put a bucket between her legs when her water breaks? Gotta wash the dog sometime.

  10. It sounds like the issue isn’t whether or not the hospital was willing to give the patient her placenta, but rather that state law requires a court order for them to be allowed to do so. Though, perhaps hospital lobbyists promoted the law as a way to reduce their own liability. Rather than have to justify a decision/policy one way or the other, they can just say “The courts made us do it.”

    1. I’d rate that hypothetical at a greater than 90% plausibility level.

  11. She should have said she was gay.

  12. Do you serve that with fava beans and a nice chianti?

  13. The folks at Saturday Night Live once came up with a fake commercial for “Placenta Helper,” a product to help housewives stretch the family food budget. I’m pretty sure Standards and Practices refused to let it on the air.

  14. This is a really big deal: if she can eat the entire placenta, her kid becomes the stallion that mounts the world.

    1. “I Ate My Kid’s Entire Placenta And All I Got Was This Stupid T-Shirt”

  15. I assume that means red wine?

  16. I’ll have the long pork please.

  17. Yes According to Me She Should Assume That She was Gay.
    http://goo.gl/Zkk6wB

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