The End of Doom

The End of Doom is the Anti-Doomsaying Book for this Decade

So says Purdue University President Mitch Daniels in the Wall Street Journal

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Bailey

The Wall Street Journal earlier this month asked various friends to name their favorite books for 2015. Former Indiana Governor and current Purdue University President Mitch Daniels very kindly selected my book The End of Doom: Environmental Renewal in the Twenty-first Century as one of his 2015 favorites. Daniels wrote:

No, we're not all going to starve, and, no, we're not going to run out of anything essential and irreplaceable. Unless boneheaded government precludes it, human ingenuity will continue to surprise and to produce answers to all such challenges. But in an era when people receive

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"genius" awards for careers of colossally fallacious doomsaying, an occasional corrective is valuable, and Ronald Bailey's "The End of Doom: Environmental Renewal in the Twenty-first Century" is one for this decade.

Regarding "genius" awards for colossaly fallacious doomsaying, I suspect that Daniels is referencing, among others, my comprehensive debunking of genius population doomster Paul Ehrlich, and genius famine prognosticator Lester Brown, and genius Limits to Growth depletionist Donella Meadows.

Although I have not yet gotten a genius award, The End of Doom might be one of your favorite books too. Amazon says that if you order now you could get as many copies as you'd like delivered before Christmas.

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  1. No, we’re not all going to starve, and, no, we’re not going to run out of anything essential and irreplaceable

    In Indiana, it’s likely that the wind will eventually just blow it away. So just build everything underground. There’s not more a few days a year that the weather there is suitable for going outside anyway.

  2. No, we’re not all going to starve, and, no, we’re not going to run out of anything essential and irreplaceable.

    There will be plenty of Marxian hot air for centuries to come, for instance…

  3. Amazon says that if you order now…

    Sorry, Ron, Reason sent me a copy for free. I assume this was because of my vast contribution during 2014’s webathon.

  4. OT:Why the Mall of America is suing Black Lives Matter protesters

    The mall filed a request for a temporary restraining order last week, arguing that the mall is private property thus immune from unwanted protests. Mall of America sued eight activists with Black Lives Matter Minneapolis, prohibiting the organizers from protesting at the mall and requiring them to delete promotional social media posts.

    But Black Lives Matter Minneapolis says they’re not backing down.

    “The Mall of America has now taken the further outrageous and totalitarian step of attempting to control the speech of individuals,” the organization said in a statement Monday, calling the mall’s demonstration ban a violation of free speech.

    Shockingly the BlackLivesMatterers simultaneously display their lack of understanding of both free speech and property rights.

    1. Why would anyone think a mall would allow a protest of any kind on their premise? They are for shopping and good feelings so you shop more. They aren’t your own personal stage.

    2. The irony is probably lost on these fuckwits

    3. I’m sure they also defend the rights of KKK members to demonstrate in black owned businesses.

      1. The left’s whole conception of rights is this way. “For me but not for thee”. Just like Jew bakers are forced to bake Nazi wedding cakes and so forth.

  5. It would be super embarrassing to receive a MacArthur grant. I would spend the money to buy myself a new identity where everything I said wouldn’t be laden with artificial gravitas because some people sitting around a conference table liked the stuff I was doing.

    1. The entire section on the ‘genius’ awards made me want to go re-read Mencken.

    2. Ah, a Ta-Nehisi Coates denier!

      I suggest Hugh increases his future reparation payment.

      1. That’s settled sociology. There is a consensus.

    3. I think I could handle it.

  6. I don’t need this book having bought and read Dixie Lee Ray’s books years ago.

  7. I’m glad you wrote this article. Reminded me that I wanted to buy this book for my mom who has gone very liberal as of late. Books now on the way pre-wrapped by amazon. Should be fun to see her reaction.

  8. Just watched the Matt Damon flick, Promised Land. It was remarkable how subtle it was in implying that fracking is destructible of small towns and the environment without any specifics other than Hal Holbrook’s earnest facial expression and a picture of some dead cows.

  9. “Destructible”? Really, iPhone spell checker?

  10. Bullshit. Austerity and Climate Change will kill us all.

    1. There is an implicit assumption behind that statement (taken seriously, I know you meant it sarcastically) that everyone is too stupid to take care of anything. Somehow, only the enlightened top men know how to spend money or adapt to changing conditions. Where such supermen came from, who knows.

      1. Right. The fact that pre-historic humans managed to adapt to living everywhere it is even remotely possible to live means nothing. We will never be able to survive things being slightly warmer.

        1. In some sense, many of those early humans lived or died on the quality of their leadership. We didn’t spring into existence with the feudal system in place; it was, in its own way, superior to what came before. But none of these fools who want more government, or the knaves who promise to deliver it to them, has anything approaching the sort of qualities that were necessary in such survival scenarios. Braying about austerity being the downfall of civilization is to admit that you have no idea what civilization is in the first place.

        2. Society switched to electricity because the government mandated everyone to, shortly after the world ran out of candles.

          1. It’s funny how yesterday’s bourgeois excesses become today’s “basic needs”.

  11. “Regarding “genius” awards for colossaly fallacious doomsaying, I suspect that Daniels is referencing, among others, my comprehensive debunking of genius population doomster Paul Ehrlich, and genius famine prognosticator Lester Brown, and genius Limits to Growth depletionist Donella Meadows.”

    Hey, about that “Peace Prize”…

  12. And just in time to fill stockings for the Peak Frankincense season

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