Regulation

I Can Smell It. I Can Smell It Right Now.

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Credit: stevendepolo / photo on flickr

During a recent cookout at his Florida home, Scotty Jordan got a visit from a Pinellas County code enforcement officer who warned him he'd have to keep the smell on his own property. The officer said a neighbor had complained and the county code says that cooking odors can be considered a nuisance.

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  1. ‘If a sufficient number of complaints, representing different households, are reported and an inspector witnesses the problem, they can issue a warning letter.’

    And so marks the escalation of the neighbor war.

    1. Here’s the full quote of the county web site, from TFA (emphasis added):

      The environmental section of the Pinellas County website states: ‘Commercial barbecue cookers are not exempt from causing a nuisance odour.

      ‘If a sufficient number of complaints, representing different households, are reported and an inspector witnesses the problem, they can issue a warning letter.’

      The inspector was out of his area of expertise, ie, he is fully qualified to be a government bureaucrat.

  2. What a bunch of losers. From the state of Florida for enacting such a stupid law all the way to retarded neighbors who complain.

    Plenty of ‘fuck you assholes’ to go around.

  3. Maybe the neighbors complained because Scotty is an asshole who recently took up the hobby of smoking pork 24/7 outside his neighbor’s bedroom window.

  4. Prosecutor: “And why did you perform a search on the defendant’s vehicle?”

    Cop: “When he rolled down his window, I noticed the distinct smell of barbecue.”

  5. Neighborhood barbeque rule #1. Invite the neighbors.

    1. Rule #2. Live somewhere that your neighbors are at least a couple hundred yards away.

  6. Thomas Jefferson proposed a grant of 50 acres to any free man who didn’t already have at least 50 acres.

    There was a reason!

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