Tunisia

Tunisia Arrests 9 in Deadly Museum Attack; ISIS Claims Responsibility

Nineteen people were killed when gunmen stormed the Bardo National Museum in Tunisia.

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via euronews

Yesterday two gunmen stormed the Bardo National Museum in Tunisia, taking hostages and killing 19 people, mostly tourists, and injuring another 44. After the gunmen took hostages, police stormed the museum and killed both attackers.  Now Tunisian authorities have made nine arrests, as Fox News reports:

A statement from Tunisia's presidential office said that five of those arrested were directly connected to the operation, which involved two gunmen attacking the National Bardo Museum in the country's capital, Tunis. Four other suspects were linked to the attackers and were based outside the capital.

The statement described the attackers as a "cell," but did not give any further information or note if they were part of a larger group.

Newly-elected Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi said Wednesday that Tunisia was "in a war with terror." He condemned what he described as "savage minority groups" after gunmen stormed the museum.

An audio message posted online purporting to be from the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) claimed responsibility for the attacks. ISIS, like other radical Islamist groups, consider museums to be blasphemous and often destroy them whenever they take over.  ISIS militants recently ransacked the Mosul Museum, destroying priceless ancient artifacts in the second largest museum in Iraq, located in its second largest city. ISIS has controlled Mosul since last year. In 2012, when radical Islamists briefly took over Timbuktu in Mali after weapons and militants poured in from Libya after the Western-backed civil war there, destroyed centuries-old artifacts in that ancient city.

The practice of destroying artifacts goes back centuries. In fact, the destruction of the Sphinx's nose in Egypt, often attributed to Napoleon Bonaparte, was:

vandalized in 1378 A.D. by Mohammed Sa'im al-Dahr, a "fanatical sufi of the oldest and most highly respected sufi convent of Cairo." The nose and ears are mentioned specifically as having been damaged at this time. According to one account, Haarmann states, the residents in the neighborhood of the Sphinx were so upset by the destruction that they lynched him and buried him near the great monument he ruined.

In early 2001, the destruction by the Taliban, which ruled Afghanistan, of 1,700-year-old Buddhist sand statues, received international attention and condemnation.

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  1. Jeez. They’re really going after museums these days.

    1. No, people have been doing it for a while now.

      1. An Eli Wallach movie I need to see.

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  2. The practice of destroying artifacts goes back centuries. In fact, the destruction of the Sphinx’s nose in Egypt, often attributed to Napoleon Bonaparte, was actually caused by [Mohammed Sa’im al-Dahr] (…)In the summer of 2001, the destruction by the Taliban, which ruled Afghanistan, of 1,700-year-old sand statues, received international attention and condemnation.

    This has nothing to do with Islam or it’s practitioners. Why are you writing this article, Ed? In how many different ways would you subvert the constitution to stop museum massacres and artifact destruction? When did you stop beating your wife? Traitor! Coward! /Channeling Ken Shultz

    1. the residents in the neighborhood of the Sphinx were so upset by the destruction that they lynched him and buried him near the great monument he ruined.

      Good for them.

  3. I’m just glad the Iranians haven’t destroyed Persepolis.

  4. “The practice of destroying artifacts goes back centuries. In fact, the destruction of the Sphinx’s nose in Egypt, often attributed to Napoleon Bonaparte, was actually caused by actually”

    Whoever this actually person is, they sound like a dick.

  5. This post could have used some grammar and style checks.

    1. Does this guy even have a Masters in Journalism?

      1. Sure, but it’s worthless because it’s not from Columbia.

        1. Cocaine? What?

  6. I always appreciated Stephen Bardo’s tough defense and reasonable ball handling when he played at Illinois, but a whole museum?!

  7. I don’t see it mentioned in this article, but I read on the wsj that ISIS mentioned the attack was aimed at “citizens of crusader countries”. So naturally Obama’s going to read it in the newspaper and say he told us so. Those tourists should know better than to be the same color as some dead Medieval warmongers.

    1. Blowback!

      1. Cocaine? What?

        1. Yes, please! Oh.

    2. ISIS mentioned the attack was aimed at “citizens of crusader countries”

      I love how they use our own ignorance of thousand-year-old history to guilt-trip gullible Westerners. I guess it helps that they probably think they’re still living it.

      1. I’m not even so sure that Christendom must show penance for the crusades to the muslims of all people. Exhibit A) Muslims did plenty of their own invading. Like when they conquered the holy lands in question from Christians and forcibly converted the whole region. And B) Let’s not forget about Al-Andalus and their numerous attempts to sweep across Europe both in Charlemagne’s time and for many centuries further on in the form of the Ottomans and corsairs that attempted to seize Italy.

        Put the crusades into two ounces of context and suddenly white guilt makes even less sense than before. It takes a fundamental bias and/or lack of understanding of history to use the crusades as a justification for damn near anything in today’s world.

  8. “Arab Spring”.

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