Puppycide

Probation Office Shoots and Kills Dog After Allegedly Pushing the Door Open to Let Him Out

Probation officer was looking for someone who wasn't at the home. Resident says she tried to keep the dog from running outside but the officer prevented her.

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via KBAK

A probation officer in Kern County, California was looking to serve a felony warrant on Faustino Ponce when he tried to push his way into the home of Monica Montoya, where he says he was told Ponce was staying. Montoya says she opened the door to talk to the probation officer but tried to close it again when her dog, a five year old German shepherd chow chow mix named Buddy, got too close. Because the probation officer tried to push the door open, she says, Buddy was able to run out into the front yard. That's when the probation officer feared for his safety and fired a single shot at Buddy, killing him.

KBAK in Bakersfield reports:

"I'm not against probation or police, at all, but I think that they could use different tactics to get him down," [Montoya] said. "He wasn't just our dog, he was like my son, my family. He'd been through everything with us."

Montoya claims her dog's death is unjustified, because the wanted man had never been inside her home.

Chief probation officer T.R. Merickle said he can relate to why the Montoya family is upset.

"I know how much a dog can be a part of the family. I'm a dog owner, I understand that. It's just very unfortunate," he said.

Merickle said his officers are sent into unpredictable situations and trained to make split-second decisions.

"Since AB 109, the probation department has also had to supervise people that are directly released from prison. That raises a different type of population than we've ever had in the past; and it's raised that level of seriousness," he said.

The county probation office says it won't talk about the case specifically since it's under investigation, but Merickle insists probation officers aren't just responsible for protecting themselves in dangerous situations but the community too.

AB109 (and AB117) are public safety "realignment" laws meant to reduce the prison population by keeping "low-level" inmates out of the system.

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  1. Woe be to anyone who shot my dog.

    And by woe, I mean equal treatment from my .357

  2. The peasant had the nerve to try to shut the door on the king’s man, so our brave knight killed the dog to show the peasant a lesson. At least the officer went home to his family. That’s all that really matters.

    1. Woman (after gunning down the cop): “That crazy mother-fucking cop just up and shot my dog for no reason. I was in fear for my LIFE! How did I know he wasn’t going to shoot ME next? That’s why I shot him with the shotgun… 14 times.”

  3. That’s when the probation officer feared for his safety and fired a single shot at Buddy, killing him.

    “Here puppy, puppy! Come here! Aw, that’s a good dog.”

    *BLAM*

    “Teach you to shut the fucking door on me you fucking fuck!”

    1. “Here puppy, puppy! Come here! Aw, that’s a good dog.”

      Truth is stranger than fiction.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmNay7htV4s

    2. It actually does look like that:

      The officer and the dog moved out into the yard before the single shot was fired.

      She went to where she saw the dog was, and then got scared & killed it.

  4. “Since AB 109, the probation department has also had to supervise people that are directly released from prison. That raises a different type of population than we’ve ever had in the past; and it’s raised that level of seriousness,”

    AB109 (and AB117) are public safety “realignment” laws meant to reduce the prison population by keeping “low-level” inmates out of the system.

    So, unsurprisingly, the probation pigs are shitting their pants over low level drug offenders and other (probably) non-violent offenders who probably shouldn’t have been in prison in the first place. How unsurprising.

    I’m guessing that since mostly sociopaths are going into these jobs now, their ability to “read” another person for whether they think they are potentially dangerous–something non-sociopaths do all the time–is weak to nonexistent. That’s why they are always so fucking pants-wetting terrified of anyone they have to deal with. They’re literally incapable of making a normal, healthy assessment of whether that person is actually dangerous or completely harmless.

    1. My father was a probation officer and he said the worse thing that happened to the department was when they had to start hiring a ton of women to be probation officers (for gender equity).

      According to him the female PO’s would often go to the supervisors and have all the dangerous felons transferred from their caseload to a male’s caseload because they were scared to confront the dangerous felons.

      My father would get pissed because instead of the normal mix of a few real bad guys and a bunch of mostly harmless guys who just fucked up and got caught he was ending up with all bad guys.

      1. Why were such bad guys being released on parole?

        1. Minnesoda is very liberal. Most of them get out after serving a bunch of years in prison, but the parole board still thinks that releasing them is “fair”.

          We think that if we let them out, they can be reformed and become productive members of society again.

          There are also assholes who have done bad violent things but can’t be convicted of them but who get rung up on some petty charge like writing bad checks. So they are on probation for the minor charge, but are really a bad guy.

        2. Gotta make room for the druggies, duh.

        3. Why were such bad guys being released on parole?

          You mean the cop? Dunno. I think he should be in prison.

      2. Just more proof that for all their blather, women are nowhere near equal to men.

    2. Hadn’t thought of that before. Good point. Also explains why they’re so willing to shoot. No empathy. Just fucking sickos running around with their dicks out screwing over everything they see.

  5. It’s just very unfortunate,” he said.

    By which he means, “Tough shit, Peon. You have absolutely no recourse against us, whatsoever, so STFU and GTFO.”

  6. Wait, so the dog ran out into the yard. That would mean it ran right past the PO since he was the one that kept the door open.

    So doesn’t that mean the dog wasn’t actually charging him?

    1. Irrelevant. The murderous pit bull just missed on its first attempt at mauling the officer. It was certain to try again, right after it sniffed that bush and peed on that fence post.

    2. “Whoops, I let your dog out. BLAM! There you go, now he won’t run away.”

  7. Merickle said his officers are sent into unpredictable situations and trained to make split-second decisions

    .

    Mr Mericle, your officers are cowardly pieces of shit.

    1. Mr. Merickle would benefit from seeing the statistics on how often officers are hurt (rarely) and killed (never) by dogs. No, wait. Mr. Merickle’s status as a LEO renders him immune to data or logical thought. Nevermind.

    2. Mr Mericle, your officers are cowardly pieces of shit.

      I think that’s understating it and gives shit and cowards a bad rap.

  8. Merickle said his officers are sent into unpredictable situations and trained to make split-second decisions.

    Top. Of. The. Class.

    1. Well, he’s right, you know–that officer had to make a split second decision whether to shoot the dog or its owner.

      1. I’m just impressed that he killed the poor thing with his first shot. He really is top of the class in that regard. Usually the report goes something like “19 shots were fired. The animal was struck three times and bled out over the next 2 hours while no one was allowed to treat it.”

    2. In other words, procedures were followed.

  9. Because the probation officer tried to push the door open, she says, Buddy was able to run out into the front yard.

    Wow! Was there a warrant?!? Or was the probation officer unlawfully committing an armed home invasion?

    1. Of course there wasn’t a warrant. Probation officers don’t need one to fuck with someone on probation. Just because the officer was completely wrong, doesn’t mean he shouldn’t be able to force his way in, amirite?

      1. The latest episode in, “why the exclusionary rule isn’t enough.” This woman could?won’t, but could?be compensated for the death of her dog. But she would have literally zero recourse if the officer simply invaded her home and didn’t kill anything.

      2. How was he to know that the perp wasn’t there without forcing his way in? There’s no other way of getting that information. Besides, the occupant was acting suspicious by not immediately submitting to a search. That’s instant probable cause.

    2. I’m pretty sure that, as a condition of being on parole, the parolee gives up their right to a warrant. Add to that qualified immunity, and you get a situation where as long as the probation officer claims (truthfully or untruthfully) that they thought the parolee was at a residence, they do not need a warrant to force their way in (and kill anyone who resists).

      1. Yes, but she’s not the parolee.

        She’s just some ordinary citizen whom someone else thought was hosting the parolee.

        There is no “some moistened bint thinks a parolee lives on your property” exclusion to the 4th amendment.

        1. Qualified immunity trumps the 4A.

          1. again with the immunizations!

            1. You mean vaccines?

      2. And when he tries to force his way into the wrong house and gets shot for it, I’ll applaud.

        Cops always argue that they were “in fear for their lives” – but that street goes both ways. When a cop DOESN’T obey the law and commits what would ordinarily be a criminal act, you are within your rights to be “in fear for your life” and use deadly force.

        If more people were killing renegade cops, it would become less of a problem. Just look at NYC. Since that whack job whacked two cops, the cops have become MUCH more circumspect. Now imagine if a bad cop were getting gunned down every day. They might even learn manners.

    3. Hard to say:

      probation officer in Kern County, California was looking to serve a felony warrant on Faustino Ponce when he tried to push his way into the home of Monica Montoya, where he says he was told Ponce was staying.

      Sounds like there was at least a warrant for the arrest. Pretty sure that doesn’t mean I have to open my door for him unless he has one to search my house. Lawyers?

      1. IANAL, but I think he’d require probable cause to conduct a search of someone else’s house that was not listed on the warrant.

  10. ARRGH !
    Always with the “split second decision” !
    I am so goddam tired, every time one of these cretins kills a person or a pet, hearing about the “split second decision”.

    Some stranger with a gun and uniform pounded on my door demanding entry. I had to make a split second decision.

    1. The only split second decision you are allowed to make is to obey. Anything else forces them to make a split second decision on how to force you to obey. If they decide to kill you, then you’re dead. And nothing else will happen.

    2. “Always a split decision.”
      -Sam Adams

    3. I am so goddam tired, every time one of these cretins kills a person or a pet, hearing about the “split second decision”.

      Exactly. If you stop for just 5 seconds and think about things then, by definition, it’s not a split second decision, is it?

    4. So if the UPS driver shows up, rings the door bell and your dog gets out when you answer it, there would be no repercussions if he pulled out a pistol and shot the dog?

    5. Never answer the door without a 12-gauge shotgun leveled at the door. That way, your “split-second” is shorted than the pig’s “split-second”.

  11. “Since AB 109, the probation department has also had to supervise people that are directly released from prison. That raises a different type of population than we’ve ever had in the past; and it’s raised that level of seriousness,” he said.

    And this has what to do with the dog?

    1. Look, he couldn’t be certain if it was actually a dog or the felon he was sent to apprehend cleverly disguising himself as a dog.

  12. I wonder what industry would attract these types?

    DSM-5
    The APA’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), defines antisocial personality disorder (Cluster B):[7]

    A) A pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others, occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three or more of the following:
    – failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest;
    – deception, as indicated by repeatedly lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure;
    – impulsivity or failure to plan ahead;
    – irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults;
    – reckless disregard for safety of self or others;
    – consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain — consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations;
    – lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another.
    B) The individual is at least age 18 years.
    C) There is evidence of conduct disorder with onset before age 15 years.
    D) The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of schizophrenia or a manic episode.

    1. Isn’t animal cruelty/murder symptomatic of psychopathy as well? Honestly, how do these people skip right over “let sniff hand, give chin a scratch” to “unleash hollow point copper jacket” unless it’s part of their psyche?

  13. My father was a probation officer for over 30 years. He never carried a weapon (OK, he often had a shotgun or rifle in the trunk of his car so he could hunt).

    The coolest thing he had was a pair of handcuffs and those were jammed way down in his glove box. I’m not sure he even ever used them.

    Why the fuck does a PO need a weapon? If he thinks something is going to be dangerous, just bring along a cop or two. Wait, I guess that doesn’t help much.

    1. Didn’t you read the article? Some of the parolees were RECENTLY RELEASED. And they might have trained attack dogs, apparently.

  14. Remember: cops are absolute cowards.

    1. This wasn’t a cop though. It was a PO. All the PO’s I’ve known have been pretty calm. Mostly because the dynamic between a PO and the guys they supervise is pretty low key because the parolees don’t want to get on their bad side.

      Also, most of the PO’s I’ve known have been pretty derisive of cops. The first guys I knew who were against police militarization were my dad and his PO buddies.

      1. Looks to me like your dad and his buddies wouldn’t be welcome in today’s age of New Professionalism.

        1. Probably not. Most of them got into the profession by accident. They didn’t start out wanting to be in corrections.

          My dad had gotten a job at a prison through one of his mom’s connections. While there he realized that being a PO was a pretty good job for someone who didn’t mind dealing with criminals.

          The old guy is also a closet liberaltarian. He was pretty easy on drug offenders because he didn’t think they did anything wrong. He caught a lot of flack from the cops because of that.

        2. He was also the one who told me that most cops would be criminals if they weren’t such big pussies.

          He said cops and criminals all have problems abiding by rules and leaving people alone. The only difference is that cops were guys who were afraid to go to jail.

          1. This doesn’t mean crap because it’s just a hearsay/anecdote: but I’ve heard that psychological profiles between cops and criminals are pretty similar. Anyone have evidence/facts to back that up?

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  16. “I’m not against probation or police, at all, but I think that they could use different tactics to get him down,” [Montoya] said. “He wasn’t just our dog, he was like my son, my family. He’d been through everything with us.”

    Now you know why your dog was shot. Pretty effective warning, isn’t it?

  17. Someone shoots my 2-year-old GSD, I’m going to prison.

    1. I don’t think they send you to prison in a bodybag. I think that’s more a morgue-type destination.

      1. True. Remember Ruby Ridge? The federal pigs shot dead a boys dog and the boy shot at them with his .22 to defend his dog so they murdered the boy. Then the pigs murdered his mother while she held her 5 month old baby in her arms.

  18. It will take a Merickle to save us now!

  19. Montoya claims her dog’s death is unjustified, because the wanted man had never been inside her home.

    If this is true, I’m sure whoever swore an oath to get the warrant will be charged with perjury.

    What? What are you cynical bastards laughing about?

  20. How do these guys convince themselves they are the “good guys” again? I’m confused.

    1. They don’t. They’ve just convinced most of the general public they’re the good guys.

  21. Always buy an intercom box so you can talk to the cops without opening the door (preferably from a room other than the one the door is in so they can’t shoot you through the door either).

  22. “It’s just very unfortunate.”

    Yep. Just like a meteor landing on your house. What can you do?

  23. “Unfortunate”, translation:

    Fuck you, Peasant… shut your damned mouth and bow or I’ll shoot your kid next. Because I AM THE LAW, and you Serfs had better learn to bow and scrape to your masters.

  24. And if she’d gunned down the cop in response, it would also have been justified, right? After all, “That crazy cop just shot my dog. How did I know he wasn’t going to shoot me next? That’s why I shot him with the shotgun… 12 times.”

  25. “The county probation office says it won’t talk about the case specifically since it’s under investigation”

    I guarantee this is just another sham investigation and nothing will come of it because killing people, pets and rights are what the pigs do.

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