Rape

A Different Way for Libertarians to Look at 'Rape Culture'

|

rinoshea/Flickr

A few days ago, my colleague Robby Soave blogged about a talk on Brown University's campus between Guardian columnist Jessica Valenti and Canadian author Wendy McElroy. Robby was sympathetic to McElroy's view about "rape culture", which seems to be that the term should be reserved for cultures where rape is used liberally and systematically as a tool of terror, subjugation, or war. Both scoffed at Valenti's comment that rape jokes could contribute to U.S. assault rates. "Rape is the work of a small number of serial predators, rather than a cultural phenomenon," wrote Soave.

But why can't it be both? Perhaps rape is something best looked at as a phenomenon driven by a small number of serial predators that are enabled by the culture. Callous attitudes toward rape don't "cause" rape, but they could—in aggregate—create conditions where it's easier for rapists to do so.

Do Valenti and company overstate the extent to which socialization influences rapists? Sometimes. But there's also a tendency among conservatives and many libertarians to dismiss feminist talk of "rape culture" as patently absurd. And I like to think (or hope, at least) that this is partly a function of parties talking past one another. 

Much of the skepticism surrounding "rape culture"—and from here I'm moving beyond Soave or McElroy's critiques to criticism more broadly—takes the term to imply a) radical Islam-levels of female oppression, b) coordinated male conspiracy, or c) a consensus that all elements of rape culture contribute equally to rape rates.

But when feminists decry rape culture in the U.S., they're not suggesting life for American women is literally a constant struggle to avoid being raped. No one's saying we face the same level of sexual violence as women in, say, Syria right now. That would be absurd. Which is why I find the "South Africa—now there's a rape culture, ladies!" argument to be oversimplified and unproductive. "If somebody else has it much worse, that doesn't really change the fact that you have what you have," to quote a navel-gazing coming-of-age novel. We don't need to be experiencing epidemic levels of sexual violence to still be experiencing too much sexual violence and, perhaps, have a conversation about how culture contributes to that.

Invoking "rape culture" is simply a way of looking, academically or anecdotally, at how the ephemera around sex and sexual violence may systematically create subtle biases in behavior and perception. That's all "rape culture" really means: that certain beliefs and norms in our society may make it easier for sexual violence to take place.

These norms aren't generally seen by feminists as some coordinated, intentional campaign of "the patriarchy." As Cory Massimino wrote recently at Students For Liberty, it may be best to think of rape culture as spontaneous order. "There is no conscious effort on the part of men to establish 'rape culture' as we know it," writes Massimino. "However, the actions of rapists"—and here I would also add the unwitting people who perpetuate certain ideas about sex and sexual violence—"have unconsciously created an unplanned culture that afflicts all women and men."

Does hearing rape jokes make an individual likely to suddenly go and commit rape? Of course not—sexual assault is largely perpetrated by people with premeditated intent, not people bizarrely lured to it by the power of suggestive humor. But I'd say it's also uncontroversial that the meta ways in which we talk and think about rape can contribute to how we treat rapists and rape victims in law, media, and society at large. 

And this is what Valenti and other feminists fret over: cavalier attitudes toward rape could contribute to a culture where the seriousness of the violation is devalued. And while this devaluation won't drive more people to start committing assault, it could allow those who do to thrive.

The idea isn't that "rape culture" directly causes rape, but that it makes people less likely to speak up if they have been assaulted, or less likely to speak out against someone they know has committed sexual assault. That it drives online threats and harassment. That it influences the way our police and the criminal justice system treat sexual assault allegations.

It's not just about rape jokes, either, but sexual norms more broadly. We've come a long way, but there is still a very pervasive idea in American culture that men want sex (always, from whoever, however) for sex itself and women only use sex, withholding it and then doling it out in exchange for drinks or love or good behavior. That women say no because they want to be chased. That women should say no so they can be chased. That sex is not something two people do to have fun together but something we give or take from one another. 

How much difference does any of this make when it comes to actual rape rates? I have no idea. Neither does anyone else, really. It's key to remember that we're all just playing armchair sociologist here. (I also want to stress that believing cultural attitudes matter isn't the same as saying no one should ever joke about rape.) But I believe these are all legit areas of inquiry and discussion—especially for those of us who would reject more heavy-handed government intervention into things like how colleges handle sexual assault or how law enforcement reacts to rape threats on Twitter. 

To sum up, talking about "rape culture" isn't meant as an indictment of men, masculinity, or expressions thereof. It is an indictment of rapists—and an acknowledgement that maybe, in myriad tiny ways, we all make it a little bit easier or harder for them to get away with it. 

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

169 responses to “A Different Way for Libertarians to Look at 'Rape Culture'

  1. But there’s also a tendency among conservatives and many libertarians to dismiss feminist talk of “rape culture” as patently absurd.

    Yes…because it’s patently absurd!

  2. Thanks for taking the time to womansplain all this to us.

  3. From what I have seen, ENB, the use of the term “rape culture” is intended to be precisely ” an indictment of men, masculinity, or expressions thereof”. It is not an indictment of rapists at all. If you want to indict rapists, you refer to “rapists”.

    The use of the term “rape culture” is intended to spread the blame for rape to all men.

    You may wish to redefine “rape culture” to be about “callow attitudes” that somehow enable “serial predators” to rape. But, really, if you are a “serial predator”, how likely is it that cultural attitudes do much at all to limit or enhance your predation?

    Nice try, but I’m not buying any of it. The summary dismissal of “rape culture” and those who whinge about it is by far the healthiest reaction.

    1. One more thought:

      If the feminists who are concerned that the culture is somehow devaluing and enabling rape,

      Then why the hell are they working so hard to devalue rape, themselves, but spreading the definition from forcible rape to drunk sex?

      If drunk sex and forcible rape are equally bad (and they must be, since they are both rape), then don’t be surprised if people start reacting to accusations of rape in precisely the way the rape culture feminists claim to be opposed to.

      1. I think you nailed that one pretty well RC.

        *waits for ‘nailed’ joke*

        1. Susan: “Can you hammer a six-inch spike through a board with your penis?”

    2. Rape culture’s totally a thing…in societies that actively don’t punish for the crime of rape or actively use rape as a demoralizing tool on a population through war or repression.

    3. So here’s a question RC, I agree with you that “rape culture” tends to spread the blame for rape to all men, instead of just to actual rapists.

      There have been some instances of fraternity emails being leaked talking about inviting “rape bait” back to the frat house, etc. That’s pretty disgusting to me. Another example is the “No means yes and yes means anal” thing that happened at Yale.

      So what would a campaign to eliminate that type of behavior and thought process look like? Without spreading the blame of rape to all men?

      And also, do you think there’s a perceived rise in rape because of national news and other forms of media allow stories to proliferate faster and over a wider area than they used to?

      1. I tend to think “rape bait” is more a mockery of the phrase “rape culture” than an actual attitude.

        1. If I remember correctly, in this context it was used to describe girls at an anti-rape rally that they were “luring” back to the frat house to have sex with.

          1. in other words, mockery. No one is pro-rape, except maybe Warty or Steve Smith but they’re long removed from frat house scene.

          2. It’s “jail bait” and it refers to the age of the females in question.

            1. I’m familiar with ‘jail bait.’ The term they used was ‘rape bait.’

              Unless whatever website reporting this changed it to suit their purposes, which entirely possible.

      2. Those are jokes. A campaign to eliminate it would be something between speech censorship, and the campaigners becoming jokes themselves.

        1. By campaign, I don’t really mean anything having to do with the government, so that would eliminate censorship. Saying those things, doesn’t make them rapists. It just makes them assholes.

          I guess I’m asking how you could initiate a social change to address an attitude that you consider inappropriate and disrespectful?

          The answer is probably don’t be an asshole, and maybe more importantly, don’t raise your kids to be assholes.

          1. Yeah, I mean, just call them an asshole. Perhaps don’t associate with them if you’d like. Even write an article saying they’re assholes. But rape culture seems to imply that these jokes are leading to an environment in which rape becomes acceptable, on the basis of nothing.

            Also if you think that’s on the high end of a college-aged male making an offensive joke for the sake of being offensive…

          2. So what would a campaign to eliminate that type of behavior and thought process look like?

            it would look much like Orwell’s junior anti-sex league. No one is raising their kids to be assholes. Or to be shrill harpies, either. But that’s just the DNA of some folks. Mockery is exactly what they deserve.

            If you don’t want kids to be assholes or to engage asshole-type behavior, then your better target is the relatively small movement that attempts to target an entire gender in service to an outmoded political agenda. Our culture has allowed maleness at any age to be ridiculed, tamped down, and so forth. Backlash is to be expected.

      3. Why would you want to have a campaign to eradicate such speech.

        Do you think that it conditions those men to view rape as acceptable?

        How then do you explain the fact that phrases like “I’m killing it” do not condition the same men to view murder as acceptable.

        1. I never made the argument that such speech leads to rape. I have a problem with rape and that kind of speech – as separate issues.

          Rape is obviously a violation of an individual’s rights and I wholeheartedly endorse whatever punishments are deemed necessary for rapists.

          I don’t think that kind of speech conditions men to view rape as acceptable, however I find it disagreeable in it’s own right. While I don’t believe it should be punishable by law, I don’t think that one should do it.

          Just because you’re allowed to say those things, doesn’t mean you should. I’m trying to find the middle ground between “rape culture” and “say whatever you want.” I agree that rape culture demonizes an entire gender, but I also wish that people wouldn’t act like assholes.

          As wareagle pointed out above, I think the answer is that people suck. Good luck changing them.

          1. While I don’t believe it should be punishable by law, I don’t think that one should do it.

            Meaning what exactly? The best thing to do in that situation is to live by your principles and not do the thing that you don’t think anyone should do. You could even turn into a moralizing ass and lecture other people on their behavior if you want. But be forewarned that without the force of law, the only people you’re likely to convince are people who already agree with you.

            I’m trying to find the middle ground between “rape culture” and “say whatever you want.”

            That’s usually called “discretion”. It’s what prevents the vast majority of people from walking up to a kid with Down’s syndrome and calling him a retard, yet allows the same people to use the term in a friendly context among the “abled” without going into hysterics.

          2. The problem is this, you don’t know their minds. It is entirely possible that the reference to “rape bait” or “No means yes and yes means anal” is entirely a response to the overextension of the concept of rape to actions that are not in any rational way construable as rape (e.g. regretted drunken hookups, the blind acceptance of allegations). It’s entirely possible that any one of those guys would be more than happy to put a bullet between the eyes of an actual rapist (rather than just a guy who’s offended the tender sensibilities of the SJW brigade). I mean, do you seriously think it’s not possible that feminist labeling of things that don’t really qualify as rape may have itself desensitized people to the topic? That if a drunken hookup is rape, maybe rape isn’t such a big deal?

      4. one email you saw one time is your basis for buying into this bullshit as an actual thing?

        Dude, I’ve got a bridge to sell you.

    4. This exactly.

      The entire point and goal of rape culture is to make anything resembling normal male sexuality at the very least socially unacceptable and preferably to be merged into the existing legal definitions of rape, harrassment, or sexual assault.

      It is quite literally a war on men and anything resembling masculinity.

  4. Blah blah blah.

    HYPOTHESIS MOTHERFUCKER IS IT FALSIFIABLE!?!?

    It is impossible to disprove the existence of ‘rape culture’ or attain the conditions to make it gone. It is therefore, as we scientists say, bullshit,

    1. You beat me to it. I was going to make largely the same point.

    2. Hey Cyto, what kind of science do you do?

      1. Background in microbiology, biochemistry, molecular biology. I have a *puffs out chest* MASTER OF SCIENCE…
        and no job.

        1. Hah, my background is in biochem, currently working on an MS. Hope the market gets better for people like us!

          1. Oh, and also if you want to go into business genetically modifying plants to constitutively express luciferase and then corner the natural lighting and Valentine’s day flower market, let me know.

            1. That…is actually one of my ideas, although I had though of using outdoors as a substitute for those obnoxious city lights that blot out the stars. Could also have plants that express GFP/modified GFP and they come with a little UV pointer light.

              1. Like a circular UV light at the base of the plant/tree pointing up? That’d be so easy and is a really interesting concept… someone at my UGrad institution was working with mosses and fungi and had some cool results that were transmissible to offspring which was HUGE. The mosses/fungi could solve the issue for big tree bark, because as I understand it bark is just dead cells and wouldn’t be able to express anything actively.

                We should get in touch via e-mail… I don’t know anything about venture capital funding or where to really start for such a project, but I always think it’s appropriate to keep doors open in case things don’t work down the line. I finish my MS this summer, and I’m not sure what I’m going to do after, but if you’re interested in kicking around some ideas more seriously, I’ll make a throwaway g-mail account and post it here… just don’t want to give my full name on this site, sure you understand.

                1. YOU’RE NOT A GOATHERDER?

                2. That’s some awesome work by your colleague-transmissibility IS huge. Implanting genes by viral vector?

                  I am very flattered by your offer but unfortunately I do not know anything about VC or the like. I don’t even know how to market my outdoor glow-plant idea, but yours sounds a lot easier to sell. I have other ideas…
                  I am also…tepish about releasing my identity, as much as this place is a den of warmth and hugs. Nonetheless, I am open to your idea. Good luck with your MS.

              2. although I had though of using outdoors as a substitute for those obnoxious city lights that blot out the stars.

                Probably wouldn’t work. If you get them bright enough to replace street lights, you will have the same problem with light pollution. The problem is directionality; street lights are poorly shielded, so they spill a lot of glare and light upwards, which is what causes light pollution. A glowing plant is going to be completely unshielded and omnidirectional, so you have the same problem.

                The fix is to use better shielding for the light fixtures so that all the light is directed downwards where it is needed.

                1. I just wouldn’t have them so bright. The omnidirectional of the light would bathe the surroundings in a glow, and I would use a dark tone like green or blue (it would look cool).

                  1. Cyto: Yes, she used a viral vector. The gene was specifically incorporated and was thus transmissible. Pretty cool. I just set up a throwaway g-mail account. It took longer than I thought it would. E-mail me at ghettoslovakgoatherder@gmail.com if you wanna talk about it a bit more.

                    And Playa: no, not me personally 😀

  5. I think the reason the term is regarded as absurd is because:
    – if there’s any empirical evidence for it, I haven’t seen it
    – it is used as a (powerful!) excuse for societal/college censorship, including of face-absurd stuff like Robin Thicke songs
    – because of the lack of empirical evidence and the power that comes with the term, it can be applied to anything with little or no thought (read: Jezebel’s…actually, Jezebel)
    – and calling it out or criticizing it seems to make you a contributor to the rape culture

    You’re really gonna have to provide something on point 1 before I take any of this even slightly seriously.

    1. “How much difference does any of this make when it comes to actual rape rates? I have no idea. Neither does anyone else, really. It’s key to remember that we’re all just playing armchair sociologist here. ”

      And I know this isn’t necessarily the author of the article, but: this is fine, of course. No subject off-limits for any kind of intellectual discourse in my view.

      But AT THE MOMENT this isn’t exactly some little []. I have a strong feeling the absurd Yes Means Yes law in California is coming from the same place as rape culture hysteria. RAINN actually SPOKE OUT AGAINST IT in their letter to the White House on the college campus rape task force. And we can see the absurdity of college kangaroo courts, who either:
      – ignore victims (to protect the school)
      – go after students with essentially none of the due process ideas that are at the core of our justice system (also to protect the school)

      So, at the moment, this isn’t some obscure academic idea you’re defending.

      1. RAINN is also on the record as saying that ” “In the last few years, there has been an unfortunate trend towards blaming “rape culture” for the extensive problem of sexual violence on campuses. While it is helpful to point out the systemic barriers to addressing the problem, it is important to not lose sight of a simple fact: Rape is caused not by cultural factors but by the conscious decisions, of a small percentage of the community, to commit a violent crime.”

        1. …And that’s totally from the White House letter. Reading comprehension fail.

          1. I never fault one who makes a mistake in the course of agreeing with me.

    2. The lack of empirical evidence and the unfalsifiability of feminists claims are reason enough for me to dismiss the concept of “rape culture.” At least one that characterizes the United States and much of the Western world.

  6. Callow attitudes toward rape don’t “cause” rape, but they could?in aggregate?create conditions where it’s easier for rapists to get away with it.

    Bullshit.

    1. Not complete bullshit, but ENB fails to extend this thought to its logical conclusion–that if a so-called “rape culture” exists, it’s due to 40-50 years of increasingly libertine attitudes towards sex that feminists were, ironically in this case, front and center in redefining and popularizing.

      When women started viewing and promoting themselves in hyper-sexualized terms (aided in no small part by mass media), it was socially inevitable that men would adopt those same attitudes. Not realizing this, feminists are now demanding a kafka-esque society where they get to be as slutty as they please while men have adopt Victorian-era attitudes towards women or risk having their lives ruined by rape accusations.

      1. Good points.

      2. The goal of feminism is removing all constraints on female sexuality while maximally constraining male sexuality.

      3. I don’t know why this rape culture nonsense reminded me of Albert Brooks, but this and that stupid catcalling video brought this scene in “Modern Romance” to mind:

        Him: Sweetie, look, put on something else. Look at that, really. Please.

        Her: You’re just saying that ’cause you love me.

        Him: No, I’m saying that because your nipples look like eyeballs. Honey, put something else on, really.

        Her: I gotta go.

        Him: You have wool. Honey, wait a minute. Why don’t you take another dress, just in case? Honey, there’s people that only rape. That’s all they do. They’re out there.

      4. As I suggest above, I can’t help but wonder if the overextension of the definition of rape doesn’t, in and of itself, create a “rape culture”. If actions that aren’t logically recognizable as rape or are even regarded as somewhat acceptable are now included as rape, I find it difficult to see where you don’t wind up undermining the social stigma against rape.

  7. But when feminists decry rape culture in the U.S., they’re not suggesting life for American women is literally a constant struggle to avoid being raped.

    I’m sorry, Elizabeth. But I know far too many feminists that actually do believe this.

    1. So does she. I have noticed her tweeting Marcotte articles favorably; no way someone hangs out in that fever swamp without reading similar (or worse) on a fairly regular basis.

      1. The Twitter hive mind is a black hole that can suck smart people in.

        1. But how does that explain the World’s Oldest Millenial?

  8. With all this talk about rape culture, I haven’t anyone mention what goes on our prisons and the fact that people openly joke about it.

    And RC Dean brings up some excellent points. I was interning for a company with three of my good friends (females). We were called into a meeting with HR because the company wanted to see if they could pay for housing for the interns. We were told that if the company was going to put its name on a housing lease, then I couldn’t live with my friends(even though it would be cheaper and we were all over 18 and had lived with them before) because the company didn’t want to be liable in any way were I to rape them.

    That was one of the lowest things anyone’s ever said to me.

    1. Wow. That’s terrible, sorry man.

    2. “With all this talk about rape culture, I haven’t anyone mention what goes on our prisons and the fact that people openly joke about it.”

      Eh, that’s not fair, I’ve heard feminists bring up this point all the time. I even agree that rape jokes are largely (not entirely) tacky and unfunny, but the concept it leads to more rapes? Nuts.

      That story is terrifying, though.

      1. I’m glad that they’re bringing it up. I don’t read stuff on jezebel, etc in an effort to keep my blood pressure from spiking.

    3. Id’a quit on the spot. With a fuck you for good measure. Maybe gone to the press.

      1. I was more of hot head then than I am now. I’m actually kind of surprised I didn’t fly off the handle. I warned the HR rep to think very carefully about what she was saying because I didn’t appreciate the implication that I would rape my friends.

        It wasn’t so much a company problem, as that one HR rep was just incompetent at saying something like that without offending anyone. She’s not with the company any more.

  9. garbage. The term Rape Culture is made up PC bullshit designed to employ more feminists in academia, to smear all men as rapists or potential rapists and to prevent any actual honest discussion of these issues. Just question whether getting blotto and leaving yourself vulnerable is a good idea, and you’ll be sent straight to sensitivity training because you’re an unwitting rape supporter.

  10. If only we could teach women not to rape teenage boys.

    /rapeculturederp

  11. Robby was sympathetic to McElroy’s view about “rape culture”, which seems to be that the term should be reserved for cultures where rape is used liberally and systematically as a tool of terror, subjugation, or war. Both scoffed at Valenti’s comment that rape jokes could contribute to U.S. assault rates. “Rape is the work of a small number of serial predators, rather than a cultural phenomenon,” wrote Soave.

    But why can’t it be both?

    1) “Rape culture” implies that rape is in some way not treated as seriously as other crimes, and there is simply no evidence of this. Look at the FBI crime stats — rape has reporting rates, incidence, and prevention efforts in keeping with other violent crimes (e.g., assault & battery or murder/manslaughter).

    2) “Rape culture” also implies a societal obligation to reform or take responsibility for rapists. There is no apparent evidence (from individual interviews of rapists or anything else) to indicate that general societal encouragement was the reason that a rapist became a rapist. No one is trained to be a rapist by society explicitly nor does there appear to be evidence for an implicit encouragement.

    3) When no evidence is offered and the “solution” is always to hand Important People power, and when all preventative measures are condemned for being imperfect, one is entitled to write off the people who suggest “rape culture” as an explanation without so much as a second thought.

    1. The goal is to lower the burden of proof, the argument amounting to special pleading.

    2. and there is simply no evidence of this.

      I will point out that New Orleans and Harvey, IL Police Departments routinely make almost no effort in rape investigations. I’m sure there are others.

      I will also point out that these PD’s don’t bother investigating any crime whatsoever so they aren’t singling out rapes for disinterest.

  12. “If somebody else has it much worse, that doesn’t really change the fact that you have what you have,” to quote a navel-gazing coming-of-age novel.

    Stanhope put it much more succinctly:

    “How does your suck make my suck suck less?”

    Premise of the article’s still wrong, though.

  13. http://tinyurl.com/q6kassg

    From Cathy Young’s personal blog.

    Apparently, Katniss (from the Hunger Games) cannot be a feminist hero because she is willing to fight. And as any good Women’s Studies major knows, willingness to fight is a masculine trait, not a feminine trait.

    1. I should clarify. This is Anita Sarkeesian’s opinion, not Cathy Young’s.

    2. I am not sure whether to laugh or cry at that.

      Let me do a little google and see if this Cathy person is nuts or not……

      1. Ah. Well I kinda ran across that debate. I don’t have to google that one.

        My apologies to Cathy.

    3. Pretty much everything you need to know about Sarkeesian, in one chart (its from her thesis).

      Alternate title: “Anita Sarkeesian has never heard of Everybody Loves Raymond“.

      1. Dan Connor, Tim Taylor, Ray Barone, etc.

      2. Goddamn, yes, that’s it! Fuck that chart and her narrow minded worldview.

      3. But seriously, I should have pursued a PhD in Women’s Studies.

        Wouldn’t make me competitive in the job market. (After all, competition is a “male trait.”) But it would have been the easiest doctorate ever earned.

      4. It seems Anita Sarkeesian’s beef is with writers and producers, who are, of course, overwhelmingly conservative and Republican.

        1. Especially when her thesis paper was mainly focused on the works of Joss Whedon, who we all know is extremely conservative.

    4. Way back when she popped up, I read Sarkeesian’s thesis paper. It should actively discredit her options on anything related to gender in media. Sarkeesian has an incredibly narrow minded view on how women in media should act, specifically, that they contain ‘feminine’ attitudes (if you find her thesis paper it contains a handy chart that dictates what masculine and feminine tracts are). Hilariously, it makes the same assumptions and characterizations of any Victorian era criticism of the female sex.

  14. ” Callow attitudes toward rape”

    Sorry, I laughed out loud that you could possibly type this *sincerely*

    because that’s *such* an apt description of societys general attitude to sexual assault. we just yawn and then talk about the weather. I mean, who *hasn’t* been raped a few times? get used to it, kids!

    ‘Callow’? ‘Cavalier’? Are you fucking kidding me? You know what fits those terms more *aptly*? Things like the CDC’s ‘sexual violence’ survey that equates ‘harassing emails’ with “sexual assault’. Using contrived statistics to make ridiculous, wild assertions, then attacking people who fail to nod and agree *fully enough* as being ‘rape apologists’

    The fact that term even *exists* is a sign of how retarded and poisoned this entire subject is.

    Even more so is the fact that the subject of “rape” occurs in a vacuum where no one is allowed to point out that it has been declining even more rapidly than violent crime-overall for over 20 years straight.

    “”could contribute to a culture“”

    Oh please do go fuck yourself. The US, last i checked, was not devolving to Rural India, and its lack of devolution is not due to Vigilant Culture Nannying by puritan feminist panic-mongers.

    1. Also, what GILMORE said.

    2. PS Oh please do go fuck yourself

      Way to reinforce rape culture, GILMORE, you prick.

      1. Self-rape!!!

        1. Admit it: if you were Amanda Marcotte or Andrea Dworkin, you wouldn’t want to fuck yourself, either.

    3. She can’t bear to take the icky side of this particular skirmish in the Culture War. It’s…ENB’s shtick, basically.

  15. A Different Way for Libertarians to Look at ‘Rape Culture’

    I hope one of the choices is “not at all”, cause that’s the one I’ve picked and will continue to pick.

  16. The original definition of “rape culture” was meant to be unfalsifiable and without a shred of empirical evidence to back it up.

    However, if you want to re-define it to bring it closer in line with what is actually going on in America, be my guest. Maybe I’m just a patriarchal misogynist, but it is my understanding that the conditions in which American women live are the envy of the rest of the world.

    1. ” Maybe I’m just a patriarchal misogynist, ”

      No, I don’t think so. I’m a patriarchal misogynist, and you’re never at any of the meetings.

      “but it is my understanding that the conditions in which American women live are the envy of the rest of the world.”

      Not to a feminist. That would be Sweden.

    2. CIS-HETEROpatriarchal misogynist Caleb….CIS-HETERO. Probably something else too.

  17. Exactly what part of American culture would “cause” rape? The part where we put rapists in jail for years or even decades, then constantly keep tabs on them when/if they’re released from prison? The media who pretty much treat rapist the same as murderers? I mean where in this country is rape seen as anything even approaching acceptable?

      1. BOOM! goes the dynamite.

        Cytotoxic is on fire tonight.

        1. Thanky thanky.

  18. Nice article, ENB. You make valid points. I especially appreciate the tone of the article. Very reasonable.

  19. And this is what Valenti and other feminists fret over: cavalier attitudes toward rape could contribute to a culture where the seriousness of the violation is devalued.

    I disagree entirely. This is the same kind of concern regarding violence in general in the media at large, a belief that one is likely to trivialize violence such as assault and murder when inundated with the stuff from a fictional setting. There’s just no proof that such violence aggravates any real violent tendencies in viewers, nor that it diminishes their sense of disapprobation of the real thing.

    The problem with leftwing feminists is their cavalier attitude toward using the term “rape”; this is most apparent when they’ve called those who are concerned with due process for alleged rapists “rape apologists.” The misuse of the word here and in other contexts devalues its purpose: to signal a heinous crime. This is much like how “racism” has been misused on the left.

  20. Wow, what a steaming pile of article.

  21. Looking at actual rape culture in places where it actually does exist makes the discussion of it here laughable.

    1. When a feminist has to hear a frat boy say ‘that test raped me’ it’s almost exactly the same as when women in Saudi Arabia are sentenced to be raped by prison guards for committing the ‘crime’ of adultery.

      If you disagree, you’re just a rape-sogynist.

  22. I think it comes back to how the terms are used.

    I have much less objection (if any) to the way ENB has used and defined rape culture in this article. But I’ve seen it used plenty of times in ways that have bothered me. It’s similar to “feminist” to me. I may or may not be a “feminist” depending on how the term is defined. I’m certainly not a feminist if that means getting rid of due process, affirmative action for women, promoting bogus statistics, etc. But I am certainly a “feminist” (or, rather, a libertarian individualist) if it’s defined as treating an individual woman the same as an individual man.

    With that said, I think ENB on point most of the time, and I hope I can take the time to consider her arguments fairly, even if I disagree with the “radical feminists” of the world.

  23. Rand’s influence has made some of us acutely aware of the influence of language in political debates, particularly with people who play the oppressor/oppressed card all day, every day. The “privilege” canard is a rebranding of the old favorite of racism, and the claims about “rape culture” are a new means of spinning another old accusation, namely that men or society, bear collective guilt for a particular crime, if not for perpetrating it, then for failing to take it seriously.

    I don’t see any evidence of that as a systemic problem any more than I see a recognizable “murder culture” or a “theft culture.” Both of these crimes are portrayed more sympathetically in popular art–see protagonists in Boardwalk Empire, the Sopranos, the Wire, Dexter, and on and on–and yet I’ve never heard anyone hector me about “murder culture” as a widespread cultural problem. The exception being the occasional RKBA enemy who mirrors the oppressor/oppressed rhetoric in an effort to shame gun owners as participants in a murder culture.

    Why would that be the case with the crimes of murder and theft, but not rape? The straightforward answer is that you score few or even negative political points by condemning all of society for murder, as individuals in Maine are unlikely to take kindly to the notion that they are somehow responsible for a shooting in Atlanta.

    1. The most interesting thing about this shrill, already tired attack on the latest class of oppressor–namely people wielding penises sans license–is that the only reason why we don’t ridicule the accusations of “rape culture” into the same rhetorical grave as “murder culture” or “robbery culture” is because we take the crime of rape so seriously that we’re hesitant to mock anyone who brings it up. The more vicious advocates of the oppressed/oppressor culture wars understand this, which is precisely why they feel comfortable employing our sensitivity to rape as a weapon against us.

    2. I don’t see any evidence of that as a systemic problem any more than I see a recognizable “murder culture” or a “theft culture.” Both of these crimes are portrayed more sympathetically in popular art.

      And even where rape is portrayed, it is never in a positive, or even sympathetic, light. It is shown for it is: an evil act.

    3. There was a great Ayn Rand quote along the lines of ‘if it doesn’t make sense, just ask what it achieves’ but I can’t quite recall it.

  24. To sum up, talking about “rape culture” isn’t meant as an indictment of men, masculinity, or expressions thereof. It is an indictment of rapists?an an acknowledgement that maybe, in myriad tiny ways, we all make it a little bit easier or harder for them to get away with it.

    We don’t (except in prison). So it’s fucking stupid.

  25. If this is not just a troll article, then you’ve missed the boat on the definition of “rape culture”. The people who hurl around the term “rape culture” do not mean any of the things you describe. It is very closely tied to the misandrous wing of modern feminism that seeks to define most any sexual advances from a man as rape. “Rape culture” as a topic does not seek to address the topic of a violent man dragging a stranger behind a dumpster and sexually assaulting her. It begins at the level of date rape or acquaintance rape and moves from there into unwanted advances and regrettable hookups.

    You opine that we have “come a long way” on the topic of sexual norms, but then proceed to bastardize the very notion of what our sexual norms are. I don’t think there is any cultural idea in the US, or anywhere in the west for that matter, that women are somehow not sexual beings, or are not capable of determining for themselves with whom, when, where, and how they will have sex. We left those arguments behind in the 70’s.

    In fact it seems to be those self-described feminists who use terms like “rape culture” and “enthusiastic consent” who seek to infantilize women and somehow codify their inability to make adult decisions about their sex lives.

    1. ” I don’t think there is any cultural idea in the US, or anywhere in the west for that matter, that women are somehow not sexual beings, or are not capable of determining for themselves with whom, when, where, and how they will have sex.”

      Actually yes there is and it comes from those feminists who are most likely to use the term rape culture.

      Ironically their entire world view is based on the idea that women are incapable of defending themselves from the sexual advances of a man and therefore they cannot be held responsible for being an active consenting participant in sex that they regret and they are so weak that even being talked to by a man is damaging to their psyche.

  26. Nice try, ENB, but I don’t think actual libertarians are buying this. At least, judging from Cyto’s, Gilore’s, RC’s et al very reasoned and extensive reactions. And good on them. Your premise is reasonably presented, but still laughable bullshit.
    Yes, there are some women that have tough lives in America. True, the shittiness of Indians womens’ lives doesn’t make the women who have shitty lives here less shitty. But here’s the thing, ENB : A LOT OF PEOPLE HAVE SHITTY LIVES!! Man the fuck up and make your life better and stop acting like there is some conspiracy to fuck over women, when there plainly IS NOT in this country or the west in general. All this feminist talk of “rape culture” is designed to do what all proggie agendas are designed to do – shut down argument, muzzle dissenting opinions, stigmatize people with opposing viewpoints and put the power squarely in their hands.
    Also, I love how you can make an argument that there may be something to this whole “rape culture” term and never once – NOT FUCKING ONCE- mention Rotherham. Where they actually did HAVE a rape culture. Wasn’t the PRODUCT of the west, but it happened in the west. Abetted by good proggies. And you didn’t mention it even in passing. ENB, you ought to be ashamed of yourself.

    1. Rotherham should be brought up in the comments of every “rape culture” article on the internet. Not to say “these people have it worse, therefore you can’t complain”, but to point out that feminist by and large don’t give a tinker’s damn about actual rape. I suppose you could throw Bill Clinton into that category as well.

  27. Reason has some excellent writing. Some of the most though-provoking political/social analysis I’ve ever read has been here. Sometimes, there are posts and articles of lesser quality. For example, I’m not much of a Cathy Young fan, but she’s not terrible. Nick is good, although sometimes I don’t quite buy his ideas. But they’re trying, and they’re usually at least coming from a place of…well, reason.

    I try to be open-minded, but this is one of the worst things I’ve ever read on this site. I’ve been here since 2006 and I don’t remember ever running across anything this bad.

    Also, what GILMORE said.

    1. Eh this article is pretty bad but I have to give ENB credit she is USUALLY very good.

      I am honestly very shocked to see something at this level come from her

    2. 2006 is after Ron Bailey’s patently stupid articles about solving health care cost problems by requiring all citizens to buy health insurance. He was immediately called on it and he only dug his heels in even more.

      Time of course has proven the commentariat right and him wrong.

      This is why so many people skip the articles and go straight to the comments; unless shreek or Tony show up there is less derp in the comments than the articles.

    3. Oh, I don’t know, wasn’t there something about the libertarian case for Stalin – or something similar. Or maybe it was Huckabee.

    4. Probably you’re not counting S. Chapman at all.

  28. BTW, why is it always:

    A Different Way for Libertarians to Look at ‘Rape Culture’

    Instead of, say:

    A Different Way for Mainstream Feminists to Think About Consent

    See, I don’t mind being evangelized by those of other religions. If the Jehovah’s Witnesses want to come knocking, fine. What I don’t take kindly to is having the pastor invite the Jehovah’s Witnesses over to preach at me from the pulpit.

    Likewise, I grok that Reason’s target audience is different from, say, Mises.org. I don’t see how reaching this target demo requires having someone write to libertarians trying to convert them to soft-feminism, anymore than a Christian trying to reach Muslims is served by inviting Muslims to soft-pedal Islam to their congregations.

    Mind, ENB is more pleasant to read than the screeching harpies at Jezebel. However, “Kinder, More Pleasant Autostraddle” is an altogether different site with a different purpose from Reason.

  29. I do believe ENB has made a good faith and well written attempt to defend this notion that “rape culture” is a valid critique of certain portions of American society.

    I’m just not ultimately convinced of her arguments for the reasons I’ve stated and the ones many others have.

  30. ” How much difference does any of this make when it comes to actual rape rates? I have no idea. Neither does anyone else,”

    Then what’s your fucking point?

    1. It’s an unfalsifiable hypothesis. It’s not meant to be actually provable.

  31. Invoking “rape culture” is simply a way of looking, academically or anecdotally, at how the ephemera around sex and sexual violence may systematically create subtle biases in behavior and perception. That’s all “rape culture” really means: that certain beliefs and norms in our society may make it easier for sexual violence to take place.

    Define “rape”.

    As far as I can tell, the newspeak version of rape encompasses a dizzyingly broad range of interactions, up to and including smiling and saying hello while holding a door.

  32. Is somebody confusing “callow” with “callous”?

  33. I know that at this point I’m just laying on — but this is worthy of critique:

    We don’t need to be experiencing epidemic levels of sexual violence to still be experiencing too much sexual violence and, perhaps, have a conversation about how culture contributes to that.

    1) What is “too much” rape? Is there such a thing as “too little” rape? I didn’t realize that there was an optimal non-zero number for this figure, and of course a zero-rape society is as fantastically utopian as a zero-crime society.

    2) How does a conversation about culture move things by one iota? Is there any empirical evidence of this having an effect wrt sexual assault?

    Then of course this:

    As Cory Mossimo wrote recently at Students for Liberty, it may be best to think of rape culture as spontaneous order. “There is no conscious effort on the part of men to establish ‘rape culture’ as we know it,” writes Mossimo. “However, the actions of rapists”?and here I would also add the unwitting people who perpetuate certain ideas about sex and sexual violence?”have unconsciously created an unplanned culture that afflicts all women and men.”

    Is exactly why most libertarians distrust the notion of rape culture. If it is accurate to describe rape culture as spontaneous, then significant action from outside the system is necessary to dislodge this spontaneous order — and what better candidate for this action than government action?

  34. “But there’s also a tendency among conservatives and many libertarians to dismiss feminist talk of “rape culture” as patently absurd. And I like to think (or hope, at least) that this is partly a function of parties talking past one another.”

    You don’t really expect individualist libertarians to be receptive to the insinuation of collective guilt, do you?

    “Invoking “rape culture” is simply a way of looking, academically or anecdotally, at how the ephemera around sex and sexual violence may systematically create subtle biases in behavior and perception.”

    Seems to me it’s simply a way of attacking the foundations of individual freedom and responsibility by going after the individual’s right to the assumption of innocence, the right to legal representation, the right to confront witnesses, etc., etc.

    1. it’s not even about collectivism. It is about the ability to recognize nonsense for what it is and call it such.

    2. You know who else expected people to be receptive to the idea of collective guilt?

      1. Jesse Jackson?

  35. A Different Way for Libertarians to Look at ‘Rape Culture’

    Yes, if you expect libertarians to buy into looking at things the statist way.

  36. I think this rape culture phenomenon is really no different than the many other historical scare myths of Indians capturing women, or the secret underground teen prostitution rings, etc. Men love to worry about women, it’s inherent. So we’ve found a new way to scare ourselves. And we’re going to fight to protect the women from the words or whatever we’ve perceived to be endangering them.

    Of course feminists are all too happy to join in since their worldview is dependent on victimhood. So we’ve subverted back to puritanism where women are simply child like humans incapable of making responsible decisions, and the community must force upon everyone the proper way to have intimate relations.

  37. To sum up, talking about “rape culture” isn’t meant as an indictment of men, masculinity, or expressions thereof.

    I must disagree, because that is precisely what “rape culture” entails: the collective guilt of men against women. From the “Encyclopedia of Rape” by Merill D. Smith:

    a complex set of beliefs that encourage male sexual aggression and supports violence against women. It is a society where violence is seen as sexy and sexuality as violent. In a rape culture, women perceive a continuum of threatened violence that ranges from sexual remarks to sexual touching to rape itself. A rape culture condones physical and emotional terrorism against women as the norm . . . In a rape culture both men and women assume that sexual violence is a fact of life, inevitable . . . However . . . much of what we accept as inevitable is in fact the expression of values and attitudes that can change.

    As you can see, society (i.e. everybody) is a fault for rape, not the…well, rapist. We are at fault because we did not properly assess his rapey intent and actually encouraged it by not constantly chanting a mantra of “thou shalt not rape.”

  38. It’s about exerting control over others. It makes feminists feel powerful to tell people how to act and have that party comply.

    Fuck them.

    Rape is forcing someone to have sex against their will. PERIOD. It’s perpetrated by an individual, who chooses to do so. It is not a culture. It is NOT any more prevalent than in the past and is in fact decreasing.

    Look at me…look at me…I’m important and doing important works, so you need to do what I say.

    Bullshit!

    1. It makes feminists feel powerful to tell people how to act and have that party comply.

      All coercion is okey dokey except sexual coercion.

      1. That’s pretty excellent.

  39. I am one who is skeptical of the good intentions of those who use the term. Like “white privilege” it isn’t intended to inform, persuade, or understand, it is simply used to delegitimize any contrary opinion and demonize those not willing to concede Every. Single. Point.

  40. But when feminists decry rape culture in the U.S., they’re not suggesting life for American women is literally a constant struggle to avoid being raped.

    Because, LAWL.

    It should not, therefore, be as difficult as it is to explain to the average male that while you, individual man, going about your daily business, eating crisps and playing BioShock 2, may not hate and hurt women, men as a group ?men as a structure ? certainly do. I do not believe the majority of men are too stupid to understand this distinction, and if they are we need to step up our efforts to stop them running almost every global government.

    Laurie Penny, writing from her perch at New Statesman, certainly can’t be dismissed as some minor figure in the feminist movement; she represents a Platonic ideal of misandry, with a recent book deal. She is hardly alone.

    Ultimately, the problem with “rape culture” is that it represents a trading of anecdotes. It cannot, therefore, be falsified.

  41. Side note:

    I have been trying for the life of me to think of a “Rape Joke” i’ve ever heard.

    The only one i could come up with had the punchline, ‘Now its your turn in the barrel’, and it did not involve any women.

    Oh, there was another one, but it involved a camel, and also did not involve any women. Well, sort of. The punchline was, “Hey man, we *ride the camel* to the town where the girls are”

    1. George Carlin had a segment about rape jokes.

      My favorite:

      I wonder is there more rape at the equator or the north pole.
      These are the kind of things I think about when I’m sitting home alone and the power goes out.
      I wonder is there more rape at the equator or the north pole. I mean per capita, I know the populations are different.
      Most people think it’s the equator, I think it’s the north pole.
      People think it’s the equator because it’s hot down there, they don’t wear a lot of clothing, guys can see women’s tits, they get horney and there’s a lot of fucking going on.
      That’s exactly why there’s less rape at the equator. Because there’s a lot of fucking going on.
      You can tell there’s a lot of fucking at the equator, take a look at the population figures.
      Billions of people live near the equator. How many Eskimos do we have?
      Thirty? Thirty five? No one’s getting laid at the north pole, it’s too fucking cold.
      Guys say to their wives, “hey tonight honey, huh, tonight, huh?”
      “Are you crazy? The wind chill factor is three hundred below.”
      These guys are deprived. Their horney. Their pent up. Every now and then…p-pmm…they bust out, they got to rape somebody.

    2. George Carlin: “Some people say that rape isn’t funny. That you can’t make jokes about it. You think rape isn’t funny? Alright, then imagine Porky Pig raping Elmer Fudd.”

      That was the one that came to my mind.

    3. The student newspaper at my university had a “Sexual Position of the Week” every Friday. One of them was “The Prestige”, which is when you have sex with a girl doggie style, have your friend switch places with you, and then you go wave at the girl from outside the window.

      Some people got really stirred up because the sexual position was essential rape because the girl consented to one particular person and not the other.

      That’s the closest thing I’ve heard to a rape joke outside of “don’t drop the soap.”

    4. Oh, and then there’s “Four out of five people say it wasn’t gang rape.” I think I saw that one on H&R a few years back.

    5. Who wants to play a game of rape? Nobody? That’s the spirit!

      Yeah, there’s not a lot of material out there that I’m aware of.

    6. In the wake of the Daniel Tosh controversy a few years back, comedian Anthony Jeselnik tweeted:

      “This Daniel Tosh rape joke controversy really has me second guessing some of my rapes”

      Meta-rape joke? I liked it.

    7. Andy Breckman does rape jokes.

  42. Also : “They say rape is a crime of violence and not sex, but why can’t it be both? Why can’t I have my cake and rape it, too?”

  43. Also, implied: “The problem with Viagra is that it takes 30 minutes to work. I find that by that time the woman has often managed to wriggle free…”

    “I had sex with a woman that was asleep once, but in my defense, she was awake when it started…”

    Both Frankie Boyle. Fucking hilarious and I have used them both without atrribution.

  44. Just curious, ENB – do you feel like those jokes make men MORE likely to rape someone, LESS likely to rape someone, or no different? How about if I was a Pakistani cab driver in Rotherham?

    Ashamed, you should be.

  45. I have been trying for the life of me to think of a “Rape Joke” i’ve ever heard.

    I heard this not long ago. I laughed rather sadly.

    “What kind of sex do nine out of ten people enjoy?”

    “Gang rape.”

    1. Yeah, I don’t have 8 people I’d rape anyone with, so I’d probably be the 10th. 🙁

  46. OK, if you’re looking for rape culture today, you don’t have to blame old-fashioned courtship rituals. I would look elsewhere – to the hookup culture by which (well, let’s confine ourselves to campus for the moment) students get their jollies, and reinforce their sense of self, through repeated drunken one-night stands.

    Now, in that climate I can see how bad and weak men are encouraged in their worst instincts and proclivities. It’s not about traditional courtship rituals, it’s about getting coeds drunk and banging them, and the attitude of contempt this encourages, not among *all* men, not even among *all* frat brothers, but among, as I said, the bad or weak men who are encouraged by this sort of thing.

    By way of supporting evidence, let me refer you to a recent article in the right-wing fundamentalist publication Rolling Stone about what I can only call the hookup/rape culture at the University of Virginia (I bet Thomas Jefferson wishes he were alive to see it!). It’s full of the usual feminist BS, but decide for yourselves whether it’s traditional attitudes, or modern libertinism, which is contributing to this problem.

    http://www.rollingstone.com/cu…..119?page=7

  47. I have a serious cat issue and I need help.

    I am taking care of my friend’s parents’ home for a while and their cat. Their fucking cat. I have to sleep here at their house, and this fucking old cat cries like a bitch 4-5 am in the morning and won’t let me sleep. When I don’t sleep I get erratic. I have resorted to grabbing this cat by the nape at 5 am when it whines, placing it under the bathroom faucet, and letting her rip. Or just spitting water out of my mouth at it. The reaction is always hilarious: terror, confusion, and it running downstairs and giving me some hour or more of peace before bugging me again. If you have a better idea than the water boarding technique, I am open to it. Otherwise, in about 11 hours there is going to be a screaming and wailing from the area of the bathtub overlaid with my cruel laughter.

    1. Catnip. Or a spray bottle full of water. I hate cats(unless they’re cooked just right) but my wife loves the little shits. These two things have maintained my sanity.

    2. The Dick Cheney method keeps them occupied for hours as they groom themselves back to some semblance of feline respectability. Be nice, and give them a good brushing afterwards.

      BTW is the cat Siamese?

        1. See if cat is hungry. Maybe they wake up at oh-dark thirty, and that’s when it gets fed? Otherwise, lock it in a room with its litterbox, water, and food, stuff a towel under the door, and let it yowl its head off.

    3. The catnip and the spray bottle are both excellent suggestions. You can get catnip toys just about anywhere that has pet stuff, usually even the grocery store or the drug store, you don’t have to get to a pet store.

      Also, probably not your problem but just in case: when the cat’s going bonkers look around for any smallish object that the cat is treating like it’s captured prey — could be a soft cat toy, a ribbon, a sock, anything kinda mouse-sized. If there is something like that, just grab it and stick in a drawer. I’ve got a cat who picks up little shit like that and caterwauls over it like crazy, but as soon as I take it away, problem solved.

      Good luck…

      1. The problem isn’t the cat going crazy-I like that. It’s the crying for attention.

    4. When a neutered cat meows like crazy:
      1) hungry
      2)thirsty
      3) wants outside
      4) has urinary tract infection and can’t pee
      5) has just caught something and wants you to eat it with him.

      1. My cat meows for me to throw her mouse around.

  48. “The libertarian case for rape culture”

    1. *shudder*

    2. “Foreward by Steve Smith.”

  49. “The libertarian case for rape culture”

    Hey, I thought that was Baylen Linnekin’s beat?

    /Canola joke

  50. This is no different than the dueling articles a while back about the precise definition of “feminism”, where we shift the entire focus of the conversation by using a benign, noble-sounding, and completely non-standard definition of the term in question. To wit, when you define “feminism” to have a precisely identical meaning as libertarianism or egalitarianism, anyone who doesn’t identify themselves as a “feminist” sounds like a right prick. Of course, “feminism” doesn’t, in reality, mean “libertarianism” or “egalitarianism” in its standard usage by the vast majority of people who identify with the term, so you end up with a debate surrounding a strawman.

    When ENB convinces the rest of mainstream feminism that her entirely non-standard definition of “rape culture” is the more meritorious and it is adopted as the new standard, this would still be a pretty ridiculous conversation, but one that might be at least worth having in the context of intellectual wankery. Keep us posted on your progress.

  51. I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that nobody involved in the “war on rape culture” has actually been raped.

    Cause being raped is far worse than some 15 year old on the internet teabagging your corpse in COD and screaming “I raped yo ass, nigga!”

    I suggest that we round up rape culture warriors and rape them, just so we can be sure they know what they’re talking about.

  52. This is navel gazing over something that deserves a much simpler response. Rape culture is a neologism that needs to be forever consigned to outer darkness, along with whitesplaining, mansplaining, neurotypical, cisgender, allies, white privilege, check your privilege, safe space, the patriarchy, diversity, […add your other favorite neologisms here].

    The proper response to the non-ironic use of any of them is riotous laughter and recognition that the person stupid enough to seriously invoke the term has just lost the debate. Godwin’s Law writ large.

  53. my co-worker’s step-sister makes $69 hourly on the internet . She has been out of work for nine months but last month her pay check was $13181 just working on the internet for a few hours. Go Here this site….

    ????? http://www.netjob70.com

  54. According to the U.S. Dept. of Justice, forcible rape has declined by about 85 percent since the 1970s. Is that because “rape culture” enabling has declined?

    It isn’t possible to have a meaningful discussion about rape without explaining the large and persistent decline in its incidence, and about what sort of men rape. If, as feminist Wendy McElroy argues, most rape is perpetrated by serial rapists, are those men likely to be motivated by rape jokes and other alleged characteristics of “rape culture”?

    The trial jurors who many attorneys claim are the most skeptical of rape accusations are mature women. Is that because they are avid participants in “rape culture”?

    1. It’s especially funny because, if anything, stuff like rape jokes and intense subject matter has notably increased since the 1970s, right alongside violence in media which also saw a decline.

      This is all silly.

  55. There is a “rape culture” in America, and most of its victims are men. It is called “prison.”

  56. It’s not just about rape jokes, either, but sexual norms more broadly. We’ve come a long way, but there is still a very pervasive idea in American culture that men want sex (always, from whoever, however) for sex itself and women only use sex, withholding it and then doling it out in exchange for drinks or love or good behavior

    Those aren’t sexual “norms”, they are a reflection of mammalian biology. Our culture has done a great deal to overcome those mammalian impulses, but there are limits to what is possible.

    By objective measures, women are already better off than men. At this point, in the West, feminism has largely deteriorated into a farce, using stereotypically female means of achieving power and dominance. But at some point, it becomes self-defeating and harmful, because there is little else men can do for women at the level of culture or society; at this point, feminism in the US and Europe increasingly alienates and divides, and that hurts both men and women.

    1. Those aren’t sexual “norms”, they are a reflection of mammalian biology. Our culture has done a great deal to overcome those mammalian impulses, but there are limits to what is possible.

      Is there evidence of this?

      1. It’s textbook biology. Polygamy, monogamy, rape, harems, courtship displays, promiscuity, dominance, infanticide, patriarchy, matriarchy, competition, cooperation, etc. are latent in all mammals. Depending on environment and culture, one of the patterns dominates.

        That is, humans are neither a tabula rasa when it comes to gender roles, nor are we automata, but mammallian gender roles are genetically biased and constrained. If there is mate selection, it’s usually by females in response to male physical displays. If there are harems, they are usually composed of females. Rape and infanticide are usually carried out by males. If there are dominance hierarchies, they are usually male. Etc.

        Culture doesn’t create these patterns, they are built in. Culture modifies and suppresses those that don’t work well in a 21st century technological society. (Even that kind of flexibility itself is part of being a mammal.)

  57. Sorry, Reason, you’re full of it this time. “Rape culture” is a term used only by liars who want to sell us all on bogus definitions of the word “rape” (and then criminalize them), and in the process prohibit all normal seduction.

    Even Rush Limbaugh got this right (and he is usually a complete idiot on any question related to sex).

  58. “And while this devaluation won’t drive more people to start committing assault, it could allow those who do to thrive.”

    How so?

    It does not surprise me in the least that the article’s author had no specifics to offer.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.