Steve Chapman on the Foolishness of Price Supports for Sugar

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Life Savers
Spencer Ayers-Hale

In 1990, Brach's Confections Inc. threatened to close a West Side factory that employed 1,100 people. The candy maker said it would move abroad unless the federal government acted to reduce the artificially inflated cost of sugar. Washington ignored the threat, and Brach's found ways to keep the plant going. But in 2003, it closed the factory and sent much of the work to Mexico. The reason for the move was a federal undertaking whose entire purpose is to prop up the price of sugar for the benefit of a small number of growers. It does so by restricting imports, limiting how much farmers can plant and guaranteeing them a certain price. These methods work: The price of sugar in this country is usually double or triple the price in the rest of the world.

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