Superstorm Sandy

Huge Costs, Risks in Rebuilding Coast After Sandy

That's a sandbar, you know

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When a handful of retired homeowners from Osborn Island in New Jersey gathered last month to discuss post-Hurricane Sandy rebuilding and environmental protection, L. Stanton Hales Jr., a conservationist, could not have been clearer about the risks they faced.

 "I said, look people, you built on a marsh island, it's oxidizing under your feet — it's shrinking — and that exacerbates the sea level rise," said Dr. Hales, director of the Barnegat Bay Partnership, an estuary program financed by the Environmental Protection Agency. "Do you really want to throw good money after bad?"

Their answer? Yes.

Nearly seven months after Hurricane Sandy decimated the northeastern coastline, destroying houses and infrastructure and dumping 11 billion gallons of untreated and partially treated sewage into rivers, bays, canals and even some streets, coastal communities have been racing against the clock to prepare for Memorial Day.