Innovation

Self-Publishing Increasingly Displaces Book Publishing Companies

For new and established authors alike, old-line publishers have little to offer

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When the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and author David Mamet released his last book, "The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture," with the Sentinel publishing house in 2011, it sold well enough to make the New York Times best-seller list.

This year, when Mr. Mamet set out to publish his next one, a novella and two short stories about war, he decided to take a very different path: he will self-publish.

Mr. Mamet is taking advantage of a new service being offered by his literary agency, ICM Partners, as a way to assume more control over the way his book is promoted.

"Basically I am doing this because I am a curmudgeon," Mr. Mamet said in a telephone interview, "and because publishing is like Hollywood — nobody ever does the marketing they promise."

As digital disruption continues to reshape the publishing market, self-publishing — including distribution digitally or as print on demand — has become more and more popular, and more feasible, with an increasing array of options for anyone with an idea and a keyboard. Most of the attention so far has focused on unknown and unsigned authors who storm onto the best-seller lists through their own ingenuity.

The announcement by ICM and Mr. Mamet suggests that self-publishing will begin to widen its net and become attractive also to more established authors.

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