Crime

Violent Crime Rate Continues Two Decade Fall, Says FBI

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A lot fewer of these nowadays

The Washington Post is reporting today that the latest Federal Bureau of Investigation figures show that the U.S. violent crime has continued to fall:

Government figures released two weeks ago said that violent crime has fallen by 65 percent since 1993….

The FBI's data showed that the South accounted for 41.3 percent of violent crime, while the West accounted for 22.9 percent. The Midwest claimed 19.5 percent of the cases and the Northeast, 16.2 percent.

Murders, rapes, robberies and aggravated assaults reported to authorities all declined last year. According to the FBI's data for last year:

—14,612 people were murdered, down 14.7 percent from 17,128 in 2007.

—83,425 people were raped, down 9.4 percent from 92,160 in 2007.

—354,396 people were robbed, down over 20 percent from 447,324 in 2007.

—751,131 people were assaulted, down 13.3 percent from 866,358 in 2007.

The FBI data derive from police reports of crimes. Earlier this month, the Department of Justice issued the results from its annual Crime Victimization Survey which found that violent crime had actually increased by 18 percent in the last year. It is generally thought that only about half of crimes are reported to the police. As the Post article explained:

Two weeks ago, the victimization survey reported that violent crimes jumped 18 percent last year, the first rise in nearly 20 years, while property crimes rose for the first time in a decade. Academic experts say the survey data fall short of signaling a reversal of the long-term decline in crime….

The victimization survey found that the increase in the number of violent crimes was due largely to an upward swing in simple assaults, which rose 22 percent, from 4 million in 2010 to 5 million last year. The incidence of rape, sexual assault and robbery remained largely unchanged, as did serious violent crime involving weapons or injury.

Think how much lower still the crime rate would be if the government would end its War on Drugs.

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15 responses to “Violent Crime Rate Continues Two Decade Fall, Says FBI

  1. The police state is WORKING!!!

    Double the budget for SWAT teams and drones immediately!

  2. See what happens when you stop counting police force activities in the statistics?

  3. It is generally thought that only about half of crimes are reported to the police.

    I wonder why…

    1. Virtually the only reason to involve the police in a crime is so that you can get the police report that is generally necessary to make an insurance claim in the event of a robbery.

      In any event, I would not call the police during hostilities of any sort. I don’t want to end up dead because a cop who was there for less than 20 minutes, and in position for about 1 minute, thought I was some imminent threat.

  4. Think how much lower still the crime rate would be if the government would end its War on Drugs.

    But if drugs were legal it would be chaos and anarchy in the streets!
    Drugs make people do things!
    Drugs are force!
    Drugs cause ordinary people to commit murders, rapes, robberies and aggravated assaults!
    Oh the humanity!
    Save us from teh drugz!

    1. Yeah of course the crime rate would fall if we stopped making everything illegal. Such word trickery will not alter the fact that SOFT ON CRIME.

  5. Does this correlate with more people doing drugs, legal and illegal?

  6. So, at least one of these datasets is junk. They can’t both be valid. The only question is: Which one is junk, or are they both?

    1. So, at least one of these datasets is junk. They can’t both be valid. The only question is: Which one is junk, or are they both?

      Different methodologies for gathering the data.

      Caulkins said that the FBI report is probably more reliable as a year-to-year measure, but that the victimization survey also is useful because it includes crimes beyond those that are officially reported.

    2. Sure they can both be valid. They cover different time periods.

  7. This proves that we need to have an adult conversation about gun control.

    Less of it.

  8. while property crimes rose for the first time in a decade.

    Thanks to Seattle PD putting up a fake pawn shop and putting the word out on the street that they’d buy anything, any time from anyone, my house was getting broken into once a quarter.

    When they finally shut the pawn shop down, all enemy activity in my sector ceased.

    Coincidence? I think not.

  9. Speaking of crime statistics, I was told (some years ago) by someone fairly connected in Chicago that the reported crimes in cities like Chicago are far fewer than in smaller cities. Partially due to defining things down for resource reasons, I suppose, but also partially to bullshit everyone else.

  10. I blame climate change

  11. “The victimization survey found that the increase in the number of violent crimes was due largely to an upward swing in simple assaults, which rose 22 percent, from 4 million in 2010 to 5 million last year.”

    Polar Bear Hunting.

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