War on Terror

U.S. Army Says Software System in Afghanistan is Crap

After a limited test in May and June, the Army Test and Evaluation Command concluded that the system is "Effective with Significant Limitations, Not Suitable, and Not Survivable."

|

It's the backbone of the U.S. Army's intelligence network in Afghanistan. And, according to the Army's own internal testers, it's a piece of junk: difficult to operate, prone to crashes, and extremely hackable.

The $2.3 billion Distributed Common Ground System-Army, or DCGS-A, is supposed to serve as the primary source for mining intelligence and surveillance data on the battlefield — everything from informants' tips to drone camera footage to militants' recorded phone calls. But after a limited test in May and June, the Army Test and Evaluation Command concluded that the system is "Effective with Significant Limitations, Not Suitable, and Not Survivable."

Advertisement