Voters Unimpressed by Barry and Mitt's Economic Plans, Greeks Cash Out, Surveillance Bill Blocked: P.M. Links

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  • Yeah … Don't count on getting any of this.

    Independent voters, considered up-for-grabs in the political cage match between Battling Barack Obama and Mighty Mitt Romney, are unimpressed by the incumbent's economic policies. They also don't like the GOP challenger's plans.

  • Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) blocked the five-year extension of a law that allows the warrantless interception of communications between Americans and people overseas. He wants a formal estimate of the number of Americans surveilled, and a requirement that surveillance of U.S. residents who were unintentionally intercepted can be continued only with a warrant.
  • The world's four major central banks — U.S. Federal Reserve, European Central Bank, Bank of England and Bank of Japan — have created $6 trillion in new money since 2008 in an effort to buy the world back to prosperity. There's no end in sight.
  • Greek voters will pick the politicians who will preside over the country's daunting effort to pay a decade's worth of past-due bills. In anticipation, people are stocking up on cash, canned goods and ammunition. Well … maybe not ammunition.
  • Baby boomers hoping to inherit their way out of debt are likely to be disappointed — Mom and Dad already spent the dough.
  • In an effort to rein-in the shadow economy, Russian officials plan to limit cash transactions to the equivalent of $18,750 or less, with larger transactions requiring easier-to-track electronic transfers. Critics argue the move will inconvenience average Russians, while leaving under-the-table deals untouched.
  • Alaskans are asking why an Anchorage man was shot dead by police after brandishing a stick.
  • In West Virginia, a Concord University police officer was charged with sexually abusing a teenage girl who was under his care.
  • Watch all of yesterday's Ask a Libertarian videos here.

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