Alcohol

Do Connecticut Blue Laws Keep Mom and Pop Liquor Stores Out of the Red?

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Those wacky Connecticut legislators are at it again, trying to legalize the sale of liquor on Sundays and deregulate pricing in one of the last of two dry-on-the-Sabbath states left in the nation. (Sorry, Illinois Indiana.) And once again, smaller liquor stores are objecting to a policy that would take the government's thumb off the scales.

This time, though, (unlike when I blogged about this in 2010) the objection is less about Sunday sales, and more about proposed changes to the pricing structure for liquor sold in the state. Right now, Connecticut has a relatively high minimum bottle price, which benefits the little guys who are less likely to be able to negotiate bulk discounts.

This week, hundreds of small package store owners crowded into a legislative office building around a hearing on the bill to complain that their industry might soon resemble pretty much every other industry everywhere, with suppliers and retailers competing on price. 

Connecticut's man-on-the-street liquor buyers are talking sense, though:

Killingly resident Matt Young said he supports changing the blue laws regarding Sunday sales, which he described as archaic.

"You'd think these package stores would be happy," Young said. "It's going to keep more sales within the state of Connecticut."

Regarding changes to pricing and permits, Young said, "It's a free-market society."

For more, check out "Connecticut Alkies in Search of a Snort"

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  1. Regarding changes to pricing and permits, Young said, “It’s a free-market society.”

    No, no we’re not. It’s an ideal, but we’re far from it.

    1. no true scotsman…

      1. I swear, even though he’s from France, he’s a True Scotsman.

      2. anon: Here’s that car you called about right here.
        Me: This isn’t a car, its a bunch of wooden blocks glued together with pie plates where the wheels should be and “car” sprayed on the side.
        anon: No true scotsman…

        1. It’s amazing how often that ‘no true scotsman’ statement is misapplied.

  2. It will give me great joy to remind all of my elitist friends that those great bastions of Redneckism,

    Connecticut and Illinois

    , still force people to observe the Sabbath.

    1. Don’t worry, we’ll soon have some northerner charge in and call you a neo-Confederate for insulting the great state of Lincoln.

      1. the great state of Lincoln

        KY has allowed sunday sales for a number of years now (not all localities have adopted it, however).

        1. And Kentucky is to blame for his wife as well.

          1. and Jeff Davis.

        2. fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu 🙁

    2. I think she must have meant CT and Indiana, because I can definitely buy booze here in Chicago seven days a week. And I have to remember when we go out to Indiana that I can’t.

      1. Illinois is a home rule state when it comes to alcohol regulation. There may be certain places in the state where you can’t buy booze on Sunday, but here in Chicago the only rule is you can’t buy booze before 11am (I think… maybe it’s 10am?) on Sundays.

  3. Every time changes to the blue laws were proposed, the liquor store owners went apeshit. Just extending closing time for liquor stores from 8PM to 9PM was fought tooth and nail. But the real shit part of the blue laws is not early closing time, or even the no Sunday sales: it was the “no sales on holidays either” part. Because if you ran out of beer at your 4th of July party, you’re fucked. (Unless you live near the border with New York).

    1. And if you don’t, you’re fucked anyway. Take that, fellow CT native from the other side of the state!

    2. I had to make a trip to Mass once on the 4th. The host of the party said “don’t worry I’ll buy the beer”. He bought 1 12 pack of Spaten (blech) for 10 people.

  4. Completely OT, but mind=fucked, and rage=maximized. Cannot resist breaking shit at the sight of this:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/new…..ead_module

    1. entitlements

      1. “A mother pregnant with her tenth child has demanded a bigger council house in the countryside, despite raking in almost ?30,000 a year in state handouts.”

        This woman is the quintessential parasite. Gut-wrenchingly disgusting.

    2. I hate people.

    3. Well, if that pisses you off, scroll down the page to see the link on the right to Kate Moss’s naked boobies, and you’ll feel better.

      1. Don’t be ridiculous. I spent ten minutes staring at those tits BEFORE I even read the parasite’s story.

    4. This has to be fake:

      ‘I like having a big family. None of my family speaks to me any more because I have so many children – but it’s their loss. It’s not about getting more money – if we didn’t cope, then we wouldn’t have kids.

      […]

      ‘Money is not tight; we survive quite well on what we have. As soon as we come back from our summer holiday, we start putting money away for Christmas.

      Summer holiday? Summer fucking holiday? This is like reading that article about the Boeing strike back in 90s when the family with a TV in every room was having to make hard choices: A new car or a trip to Hawaii.

    5. Why the hell are British people so damned ugly?

  5. What the hell happened to the thread about a movie that contained a sub thread about hash browns?

    1. John was taunted and called a kiddie-diddler again in the Morning Links and the post got deleted. Maybe some mass post nonsense was tried in the movie thread and they had to nuke the whole thing.

      1. It has returned. Apparently the trixie virus has been contained and a more difficult explanation or coverup was avoided by not resorting to the nuclear option.

  6. How did those damn atheists get away with banning Sunday sales in the first place?

    1. Because Christians are the most persecuted group in America, SF. The godless secular humanists have total control over all the levers of power in this country.

  7. Also OT, why did the post about the movie “The Artist” disappear?

    We were trying to mourn Davey Jones properly, DON’T DENY US OUR TEARS!!!

    1. because the premise of the post was wrong

  8. No Sunday sales?

    Ha ha!
    *laughs and points*
    *cries, because this is the only time a Pennsylvanian could laugh at anyone about liquor laws*

    1. Hey, some new beer Ive never had! I know, I will buy a case of it!!!

      You guys do suck.

      1. The beer distributers in PA also opposed the legislation that allowed them to open up on Sunday.

        I asked a clerk, and he said they were bummed because it meant the end of an automatic day off without worrying your competition was staying open.

        I responded, “Sundays off by law? Who do you think you are, a car dealership?”

        1. This is the primary reason that package stores in CT opposed allowing sales on Sunday. They didn’t want to have to be open on Sunday because their competitor might be open.

          Many package stores still close at 8PM, too, even though they are allowed to stay open until 9 now, because they don’t want to pay employees for another hour.

          1. Laws to repeal the ban on car dealerships being open on Sunday fail because for many employees it’s their only day off.

          2. My family has a restaurant, and back in the 1970s and 80s the county’s beer distributors association would have their annual Christmas party there.

            My uncle told me once that’s when they would get together and decide on their opening hours for the upcoming year.

            And it seemed to be true: None of the distributors in the county stayed open past 9, even though they law allowed for later hours. Hail collusion!

          3. Same for Louisville.

            The small stores didnt want the extra expense. The big box liquor stores wanted Sunday sales.

    2. 1) No Sunday sales
      2) Liquor store must close at 8PM (now 9PM)
      3) No holiday sales
      4) Grocery stores can only sell beer, nothing else
      5) Convenience stores/gas stations can sell no alcohol at all
      6) No onsite sales (sales from a bar to walk out the door)

      1. Oklahoma is similar in many ways, except the convenience stores. They can sell beer. As far as closing times, I think it’s about right, but it may be even earlier.

      2. Brings back memories of Colorado.

    3. Oklahoma has blue laws too. It sucked when I lived there. Dunno about Alabama. I’m sure they do. In Virginia, you could not buy until noon on Sunday. Grr. Why non-Christians have to abide by stupid Christian laws?

  9. Round here I can buy the hard stuff at the gas station on Sunday, but can’t purchase or repair a car.

    1. Yep, the Las Vegas metro area is weird that way.

  10. Those wacky Connecticut legislators are at it again, trying to legalize the sale of liquor on Sundays and deregulate pricing in one of the last of two dry-on-the-Sabbath states left in the nation. (Sorry, Illinois.)

    Liquor stores can’t be open on Sundays in Texas, either. And you can’t buy beer or wine anywhere else until after noon. Assuming most church services occur in the morning, that would make Texas a dry Sabbath state as well.

    1. KY doesnt allow liquor sales (or beer or wine) until 1 PM on Sunday.

      Then again, the state is entirely dry every night from 4AM to 6AM.

    2. I’m pretty sure you can get alcohol with food, at a restaurant at 11 am. But you have to order something to eat too.

  11. California may be fucked in a lot of ways, but they certainly have it right when it comes to alcohol laws. Liquor Barn FTW!

  12. I still think it’s funny that Christians call Sunday the Sabbath.

  13. Your rights come from GOD. If there is no god then where do your rights come from? Then they come from man and being ruled by man is not libertarian in the least.

    The state is a creation of man. The only laws that matter are GOD’s laws, and God’s laws prohibit drugs and alcohol.

    1. All praise the Flying Spaghetti Monster for he hath bestowed me with rights with his noodly appendage!

    2. I’m Jewish, and I respectfully disagree that God’s laws prohibit the use of drugs and alcohol. There’s nothing in the bible prohibiting their use. In fact, the only reasons Jews are not supposed to do drugs is “Dinah malchut dinah”. “The Law of the land is the Law.” So if it was not against human laws, it would not be prohibited. But there is also an injunction against doing things harmful to your body, but plenty of Orthodox Jews smoke, so… yeah.

      1. Im christian, and there is plenty of NT evidence of alcohol use.

        Including Paul **directly** telling Timothy to drink more wine.

      2. there is also an injunction against doing things harmful to your body

        Teetotaling is less heathy than moderate drinking, so that would mean an injunction against not drinking (in most cases).

        1. I quit drinking thirty years ago because of my health. My wife said she’d kill me if I didn’t quit.

  14. OT: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvs…..lings.html

    Brad Pitt’s brother looks like a cross between Zach Braff and John Travolta, right?

  15. This week, hundreds of small package store owners crowded into a legislative office building around a hearing on the bill to complain that their industry might soon resemble pretty much every other industry everywhere, with suppliers and retailers competing on price.

    I hope the law passes and every single one of these fuckwaffles goes out of business from their combined, learned incompetence from working on the dole, so to speak.

    A good, cleansing fire of competition is called for.

  16. I thought Indiana banned Sunday sales and not Illinois?

  17. Having lived in both Illinois and Indiana, I can confirm for a fact that it is Indiana, and not Illinois that bans liquor sales on Sunday

    1. You are wrong. Indiana has allowed Sunday liqour sales for at least 2 years now.

      Cold beer in gas stations, on the other hand….

      1. From wikipedia for Indiana:

        Sales limited to on-premises in restaurants, wineries and breweries on Sundays. However, carryout wine and beer may be purchased on Sundays from the address for which a winery or brewery’s permit is issued.

        So, Indiana didnt loosen it up as much as I thought, but you can get carryout sales from the brewery on Sunday, so they do exist.

  18. Is there even a difference between Illinois and Indiana?

    1. Indiana has lower gas taxes, which is why you always fill up before you cross the border into Illinois.

    2. Chicago and Indiana? Yes. The rest of Illinois and Indiana? Not so much.

  19. I don’t think anyone here mentioned the minimum pricing laws. The state liquor commission sets the minimum price all the products can be sold for thereby keeping the big guys from undercutting the little guys.

    As a bonus, there are all those state union employees that have a job just to keep the list up to date!

  20. Minnesota also does not allow the sale of any liquor, wine or “strong” (regular) beer on Sundays. Nor in grocery stores, ever; you can purchase 3.2 (3.2% alcohol–why bother?) beer only. Very backward. Of course, we have Michele Bachmann, too.

    1. I grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Minnesota, and was absolutely floored by the differences in alcohol-related laws. What? I can’t go to a friend’s 21st birthday celebration at a bar simply because I’m underage? Can’t I just not drink?

  21. I grew up in Wisconsin and moved to Minnesota, and was absolutely floored by the differences in alcohol-related laws. What? I can’t go to a friend’s 21st birthday celebration at a bar simply because I’m underage? Can’t I just not drink?

  22. While “blue laws” may have originated for religious purposes, most retailers I know fully support continuing them indefinitely. Limiting the hours they (and their competitors) can be open means they can conduct all their business in a much shorter time span, reducing costs for labor, utilities, etc. If everyone can only buy item X from noon to 1 PM on Saturdays, guess who can make all their sales for the week in one hour, then lock up, go home, and put their feet up! So what if it’s inconvenient for customers; if you want booze, shoes, cars, gasoline, cigarettes, bread, toilet paper, or whatever, you’ll just have to shop when it’s available. What more could a merchant ask for?

  23. While “blue laws” may have originated for religious purposes, most retailers I know fully support continuing them indefinitely. Limiting the hours they (and their competitors) can be open means they can conduct all their business in a much shorter time span, reducing costs for labor, utilities, etc. If everyone can only buy item X from noon to 1 PM on Saturdays, guess who can make all their sales for the week in one hour, then lock up, go home, and put their feet up! So what if it’s inconvenient for customers; if you want booze, shoes, cars, gasoline, cigarettes, bread, toilet paper, or whatever, you’ll just have to shop when it’s available. What more could a merchant ask for?

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