China

Fear of a Red Planet

Should we be worried about China?

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Have you heard that Hollywood is remaking the '80s classic—yes, classicRed Dawn? Rather than Nicaraguan and Cuban forces invading the heartland with their godless socialism, a Chinese incursion will be the focus of the remake. And once again, a ragtag band of high-school students will do what hundreds of billions in Pentagon spending couldn't do: save Michigan from communism.

Doubtlessly, the remake will be entertaining and offer a far more plausible plotline than the original—seeing that the Chinese, well, they have a proper army. Producers will almost certainly capitalize on a growing alarmism regarding China's growth. Few issues, in fact, can bring right and left together in this polarized world of ours better than a shared knowledge that China is bad news.

Now, the American populace can typically be divided into two categories: 1) Those who don't care one whit about foreign policy. 2) Newspaper editors.    

So before Chinese President Hu Jintao was here meeting with the president, Andrew Kohut of the Pew Research Center took to the pages of The Wall Street Journal and explained what we think about the topic.

Apparently, 47 percent of those he surveyed cited China as the world's top economic power. (Only 31 percent properly identified it as the U.S., which has an economy nearly three times the size.) Another Pew survey from last year found that 47 percent of us consider China's growth a "bad thing" for the United States. A new CNN poll found that 58 percent of us believe that China's "wealth and economic power" are a threat to the U.S.

I'm certain our relationship with China is layered with international complexity and fraught with danger. But why would we fear the aspects of China's ascendancy—its "wealth and economic power"—that pose the least threat to the United States? Unlike ideological clashes, economic competition can be mutually beneficial. A country with real economic wealth is typically free and doesn't look kindly on radical behavior. Suicide bombers rarely drive top-of-the-line BMWs.

I often hear talk radio hosts and politicians condemn China's nefarious role as the largest stakeholder in American debt. How is it China's fault that Washington spends $1 trillion more than it takes in in revenue? Substantial national debt is our concern, but if we're going to find people to borrow from, having China vested in American success seems like a good enough idea. (Unless China's dynamic economy is an elaborate ruse to sink us in the end.)

Buy more of our Treasury bonds … if you dare!

We can talk about trade imbalance, unfair marketplaces, and currency manipulation. These may be real problems.

We can also give in to isolationists and those who believe in closing markets and ratcheting up tariffs and hurt our own economy. As The New York Times' Nicholas Kristof recently pointed out (in a rather pessimistic piece), "Chinese goods mostly compete with products from Mexico, South Korea and other countries, and it is stealing jobs from those countries more than from America." And if there's any country we can hate more than China, it's Mexico.

We can talk about China's disgusting record on human rights. It can't be ignored. But the best cure for illiberalism is probably "wealth and economic power." How long can communist hard-liners thrive in a nation that sees its economy grow by 10 percent a year?

Let's not forget, either, that China is still a place of deep poverty, stressed infrastructure, and political upheaval; it's struggling with problems that dwarf our own. We may be overrating its influence.

I'm certainly not an expert on foreign policy (using Red Dawn as a reference point probably gave that away), but all this hand-wringing and fear seems a tad bit premature, if not irrational.

David Harsanyi is a columnist at The Denver Post and the author of Nanny State. Visit his website at www.DavidHarsanyi.com.

COPYRIGHT 2011 THE DENVER POST
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  1. David you have it all backwards. We should embrace China’s one-party rule, authoritarian style of government. We should shun globalism and Chinese capitalism.

    Don’t you understand that China becoming more like us is a threat to our way of life? Only if we become more like China can we keep the People’s Republic of America #1. PRA! PRA! PRA!

    /retardation

  2. We can talk about China’s disgusting record on human rights. It can’t be ignored. But the best cure for illiberalism is probably “wealth and economic power.” How long can communist hard-liners thrive in a nation that sees its economy grow by 10 percent a year?

    All of that in one paragraph and you still managed to ignore the linkage between slave labor and the rest. Oh, I see it there, you used that reporter trick “it can’t be ignored” then you ignored it.

    Hi heller. Good morning reason!

    1. See above John.

  3. The Chinese ecoonomy is not run on slave labor. Slave labor certainly does happen, that’s one way dissidents are punished, but the vast majority of China’s output is produced by people who work cheap.

    People from the countryside are flooding the cities to get jobs in those factories. As little as they pay, it’s better than farm work.

    We shouldn’t forget that the Chinese government is a cabal of evil men who don’t stick at anything to maintain their power. But things have improved a great deal from the 70s, at least they’ve acknowledged some basic economic realities. And this is why China has been booming, not because of “slave labor”.

    1. You are underestimating the slave labor component, so how about all that copyright and trademark infringement? Ping!

      1. I think you’re over estimating it. There’s too much production to be accounted for by “slave labor”.

        Remember the iPod factory where they had the suicides? That was a private company that employs 800,000 people. Even after the suicide thousands more want to work there. Nobody needs to coerce Chinese workers into intolerable sweatshop conditions; as bad as that factory is, it’s better than not having a job.

        I don’t know how to fix that problem, but “slave labor” is barking up the wrong tree. I think the real problem is crony capitalism. Private companies can do whatever they want to their workers, as long as they pay off government officals and don’t embarrass the government with internationally notorious rashes of suicides.

        1. You don’t need to fix that problem. You can’t fix that problem. It fixes itself over time, just as it has in every other developed country in the world. What needs fixing is the queasiness certain people experience just because China has waited until the 21st Century to commence its “sweatshop” phase of economic development.

          1. The only good thing about the situation with China is that she is so big that we don’t have to listen to whiners complain we are exploiting China and her workers.

        2. I have more than a feeling that China is the biggest bubble ever. It may be a thick skinned bubble and it may rise to become the number one world economic power before it pops, but it will pop. I find it real hard to believe that Hu is staying out of markets and not printing and subsidising companies to keep products competitively cheap and all manner of economic meddling. Not to mention how much their bubble gets inflated when we inflate the currency that backs their currency.

        3. I don’t know how to fix that problem

          kuznets curve to the rescue!!!!

          1. also the morning reason commenters are less smart and less funny then the afternoon and evening commenters.

            1. …says the morning reason commenter to the morning reason commenter.

              1. joshua corning|1.24.11 @ 12:26PM|#

                what part of 12:26PM is morning?

                1. west coast time

    2. Pardon the intrusion, but the biggest story in China for years has been the rising cost of labor.

      There was some labor cost relief through the dip in economic activity due to the U.S. and European slowdown, but not enough to alleviate rising labor costs, which are rising again.

      I’m trying to associate “slave labor” with rising labor costs and a high turnover rate, and I just can’t make those ideas fit together.

      Slave labor doesn’t feature high turnover rates–with workers quitting to get a higher paying job elsewhere?

      The “slave labor” critiques are mostly holdovers from the ’80s and early ’90s about MFN status. Yeah, in China, in a lot of places, you couldn’t just sit in a prison cell–you had to earn your keep. I’m not trying to belittle the suffering of china’s political prisoners or any of their other prisoners, but conflating prisoners with your average Chinese factory worker is highly inaccurate.

      China’s factory workers are demanding and getting wage increases and feature a high turnover rate, and smearing them as slave labor is highly inaccurate.

  4. How is it China’s fault that Washington spends $1 trillion more than it takes in in revenue? The red devil made them do it

    1. Mind control?

    2. Harsanyi is normally so-so, but that line was probably the best in the article. More of this.

  5. It’s kind of funny too, because looking back at the old movies set in the 30s and 40s, the Chinese are depicted fairly well, because they were our allies at the time.

    For instance, I am now watching a serial, G-Men vs the Black Dragon.

    One of the good guys is a Chinese secret agent. Played by an actual Asian, even.

    But then in the 50s, you saw the return of the Fu Manchu stuff.

    1. And the 1967 classic “Battle Beneath the Earth”

  6. This is like saying England had nothing to fear from a rapidly industrializing, economically exploding Germany, pre- WWI. While the nature of the two regimes is different, there is one overarching similarity between the two that cannot be ignored.
    Decades of economic expansion enabled Germany to build a massive war machine. Same with China. Capitalist or not, the Chinese are using their massive growth to arm themselves for war with America. Anyone who does not see this is in denial.

    1. If we pretend that they are a democracy of some kind then they will not attack us.

    2. Anyone who does not see that the USA is still five steps ahead in the arms race, is also in denial.

      1. Seem to having plenty of problems in Afghanistan…

        Not to say we couldn’t fully mobilize against China if we had to, something like WWII conditions where the whole country is working toward that goal. (Read: Draft)

        1. We’re only having trouble in Afghanistan because we’re not simply fighting a country but groups within a country while trying not to hurt innocents within a country which claims to be on our side. If China, the biggest(and, more importantly, most feared by Americans) army in the world, mobilized against us, the great nation would soon be nothing more than a landscape of enormous smoldering craters and there would be no significant populist uprising against America for it. The Govt probably wouldn’t have to draft a single soul and most Americans probably wouldn’t miss a single episode of Real House Wives of Atlanta. China knows this and would rather trade with us.

      2. Except for nation-building, we don’t need conventional military at all when we can just nuke any threats.

        1. We don’t even really need the nukes either. China’s infrastructure is quite vulnerable to our conventional armed forces, and they know it. That’s why they are trying to develop weapons to counter our surface fleets.

          Any war between the US and China would be largely fought in the air over China and the water off their coast. Their current strategic goal is to be able to achieve military domination over their own nation.

    3. I know that their military build-up is a concern but they reverse-engineered everything technical. Honestly, did that plane fly?

      According to news reports, the stealth wasn’t seamless and therefore non-functioning. I’m hoping the rest of their military equipment has the Made in China stamp and feel.

    4. I know that their military build-up is a concern but they reverse engineered everything technical.

      Honestly, did that plane fly?

      1. According to news reports, the stealth wasn’t seamless and therefore non-functioning. I’m hoping the rest of their military equipment has the Made in China stamp and feel.

      2. According to news reports, the stealth wasn’t seamless and therefore non-functioning.

        I’m hoping the rest of their military equipment has the Made in China stamp and feel.

        1. WTH, did I have to break-up ^ to post? While this:

          Fuck, shit works?

          1. I thought we hashed all this out on the Donald Trump sinobashing thread. Anyway, the J-20 (the airframe in question) isn’t even a prototype, it’s a technology demonstrator (the prototype phase is still several years away, China won’t be able to field a 5th gen aircraft until 2020 at the earliest). This is irrelevant as detection technology (particularly AESA (Active Electronically Scanned Array) radar) is rapidly outpacing stealth technology. Also, while the PLAN is rapidly modernizing their forces, they hope to have a 1980s Soviet carrier (the Varyag, an incomplete Admiral Kuznetzov class carrier purchased from Ukraine in 1992 because the Russkies couldn’t afford to finish building it) operable as a permanently dry-docked training platform by 2015, they are a decade away from operating out to the 2nd island chain and several decades behind the USN in equipment and experience. The idea of a combinned arms transoceanic deployment, let alone the logistical capacity it takes to sustain such an operation are far beyond the capabilities of China (or really, anybody but the US) for the foreseeable future.

            1. Thanks! I’ve stopped digging my fall-out shelter…I was worried about reaching China anyway.

              1. Oh man, repeated joke-fail…

                1. helle, I swear I could write a book on your obsession with me. I like to pick a title first. Let’s see…Helle The Man-boy Who Thought Fuck Off Was Foreplay

                  1. Huh? Since when is someone “obsessed” when a blogwhore comes around every once in a while to annoy them? Do I follow you to your dumbass site, retard?

            2. It sounds like they will be too old to fly the high-tech planes by the time they get said planes to work.

        2. The reason the stealth fighter is important isn’t that it means China has all the sudden ascended to levels of US technology, because they haven’t.

          Why it’s important is that they only need that technology to fight us.

          Not that fighting us is their intention, but it demonstrates their understanding of future conflicts and is therefore an important marker as to how we deal with China.

          Witness the high level military discussions recently to see our concern as well.

    5. Never forget the economic miracle of 1918-1933.

      1. I’m getting sick of people who see Hitler around every corner.

        This thread is full of Godwin

    6. I’m scared of my own shadow.

    7. Arguably, it was Britain’s (and France’s and Russia’s) fear of the German war machine that had as much to do with kicking off WWI as the war machine itself.

      1. Meh… It also had a lot to do with the fact that Albert Edward (King Edward VII) absolutely hated his cousin Kaiser Wilhelm II, so he went behind the back of PM Balfour and allied with France and Russia.

    8. Democracy has worked out real well for us. When everybody can vote everybody loses. Look at the stupid fucks that have ran for the Presidency so far this century. They were nominated by our genius populace.

      1. Still better than the alternative. Far better.

        1. No! A better alternative would be an intelligence test to vote and run.

          1. If there is one thing I trust bureaucrats to do right it’s design an intelligence test.

            1. Where did I say the “bureaucrats” would or should design it???

    9. As I said in the Trump thread, the idea that China wants to start a war with the US is probably one of the dumbest assertions out there. There’s a big difference between Germany pre-WWI and China today. That difference is that soft power has replaced hard power. Think about this for a second, how does China profit from attacking the US? This would mean they lose their place in the global economy.

    10. Thats why my wife and I will be moving to china. Always side with the winners beforehand

    11. There are several problems hoerver. First, China is across an ocean so it has to be a big war machine. Second 1/3 of Chinese villages are not under Communist control. Third China faces calls for democracy in Hong Kong, a sepratist movement in Tibet, a stronger sepratist movement in Xinjiang wich has lead to at least one major bombing. Add to this growing demands for further economic reform and democratic reform especially in the industrialized south it seems unlikely that the Chinese people would put up with a foreign war.

  7. This is kind of funny. In the first Red Dawn, China was America’s only allie.

    1. “Us and 600 million screaming Chinamen”

      “Last I heard, there were a billion screaming Chinamen”

      “There were.”

    2. Wait…I’m confused. At the time the movie was made, China was communist. How did they get to be on our side?

      Maybe I need to re-watch that movie…

      1. By that time, the Soviet Union and China were most assuredly not allies.

        1. A story came out a bit ago that the USSR seriously considered nuking China over a border dispute during that period, and only American diplomatic intervention stopped them.

    3. Is anyone on our side? Six hundred million screaming Chinamen. Six hundred million, I thought there were a billion. There were.

      1. Damn, Mike, teach me to start to post, get distracted and fail to refresh!

    4. And England, but they didn’t hold out for long.

  8. I know that their military build-up is a concern but they reverse engineered everything technical. Honestly, did that plane fly? According to news reports, the stealth wasn’t seamless and therefore non-functioning. I’m hoping the rest of their military equipment has the Made in China stamp and feel.

  9. I get to be the first to say it?

    Wolverines!!!!!!

    1. Thank you – that needed to be said.

      1. Every morning in my house.

  10. More free market news from China

    China nationalizes 11 rare earth mines, prices to go up in global market

    http://www.ibtimes.com/article…..china.htm#

    1. That’s awesome. I expect prices to rise to where it will be profitable to mine them here again… and then the EPA will regulate the hell out of it making “End the EPA” the new rally cry for the homeland security authoritarians.

      And then the titans clash!

  11. First off, how dare you disparage the first Red Dawn? Yeah, it looks a bit dated when you watch it now, but it was a great movie.

    Very libertarian in its messaging. Anti-gun-control, personal freedoms, defense of property, political gaming… That movie was a libertarian’s wet dream!

    I know they’re using China, so I don’t have high hopes, but I really do wish this version can live up to the original.

    “Wolverines!!!”

    1. “And once again, a ragtag band of high-school students…”

      Rag-tag? I more heterogenous group of teens cannot be found outside of Hollywood’s diseased mind. The movie was about jocks shaggy cheerleaders in the woods and occasionally shooting at Russians. Really. You can summarize the movie as “Football Team Saves America!”

    2. It was quite silly. Fifteen high school jocks save the US from an invasion.

      1. No, no, no. A bunch of kids do the heavy lifting in the early days of the war, and get themselves killed/martyred for the cause. Thus providing inspiration for the U.S., which eventually prevailed.

        Been reading a bit on fourth generation warfare. Surprising they got it right.

      2. They did not save the US from invasion, the invasion had already happened. They merely acted as partisans, irregular forces acting behind enemy lines.

  12. They actually filmed part of the new “Red Dawn” in MI – they were filming in some friends’ neighborhoods, etc. etc.

    I’m sure some of that was due to the state’s incentives to the film industry – so, ironically, we get the remake of (as Mike in PA noted) “the libertarian’s wet dream” through the use of un-libertarian “incentives” in a fucking union-controlled failure of a Blue state with near-worst-in-the-nation unemployment and little hope for the future.

    Irony I say!

    1. …although it occurs to me that shouting “Wolverines!” around southeast MI at least makes more sense than most other places.

      1. Yeah, I have no faith that Hollywood will produce anything close to the original when it comes to the message. I’d wager that the message, along with the imagery, gets completely over-run with special effects and relentless action.

        As for “Wolverines”… They were a high school mascot; are they planning on using college kids? If that’s the case, that alone ruins an important aspect of the original.

      2. Ok, I just looked up the cast for this… Not too bad, so I’m sure it’ll get noticed, but one thing really stands out.

        They made the sell-out mayor and his son black! Are you kidding me?! I can hear the cries of racism in the film already. Perhaps, and I may be reading way too much into this (very likely), but perhaps Hollywood will find a way to find some way to make the rebels seem equally as bad as the invaders. You know, “there’s really no good reason to fight against your new overlords”.

        1. I predict at least one waterboarding scene, done by the rebels. At least one.

          1. As long as no one puts Baby in the corner, we’ll be OK

  13. Wasn’t Red Dawn an alternate history where Jimmy Carter won reelection? In that case, it was pretty realistic.

  14. How long can communist hard-liners thrive in a nation that sees its economy grow by 10 percent a year?

    I don’t know. How long can communist hard-liners thrive in a nation that sees its economy grow by 2.6 percent a year?

    1. What communist hard liners?

  15. Not sure. Economic debt has been used as a tool to prevent war or force political measures to go a certain way. In this case it is not something to ignore.

    yet I do think that China is an empty giant in that it really can’t go the distance. that is the problem with socialism/communism. it denies. It cannot sustain itself and will eventually implode given the right amount of stress and influence. China is taking over for Russia. They will eventually fall.

  16. i love command/control! their implosions are so “unpredicted” by those at the helm.

  17. I have never understood the hostility against China from some Americans, without the Chinese economy, the American economy would be infinitely worse off than it is now.

    Secondly China does not “steal” jobs, having a job is not a right, if someone wants to pay other people to do it then they should be allowed to.

    1. Right on. Plus the case must be made that because we buy cheaper goods that are made in China, we have more money in our pockets to spend on other things. This alone creates more jobs.

      1. To be sure, there are a number of other countries that could make cheaper stuff for us.

        1. Ever buy a CD player made in Sudan? Piece of crap, man.

    2. “Infinitely worse”? Wow that is bad.

  18. Nixon should have never established relationships with China, that was his biggest mistake. We should have kept China the way we have kept Cuba, poor and starving. That way eventually the people will rise against communism.

    http://libertarians4freedom.bl…..-cool.html

    1. Right, that’s why capitalism isn’t slowly but surely replacing communism in China right now. Dumbass.

      1. Yeah, one of the things I think the Chinese government is afraid of is the “corrupting” influence of investing in American businesses.

        There’s been a lot of debate internally within the Chinese government over the years about making what amounts to sovereign investments directly in American companies.

        American Pollyannas imagine that the Chinese are taking over, and the Chinese government is scared to death that its officials’ interests will be aligned with American business.

        Just a few days ago, the first Chinese bank moved to invest in retail banking branches in the United States…

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/…..12460.html

        Oh noes! What if the Chinese government had to start taking the effects on American retail banking customers into consideration before they did anything stupid?! That would be…that would be…

        Excellent!

      2. Capitalism doesn’t mean democracy, jerk. Yes, in China more people have the right to try to get rich, but do they have free speech? No. I have a Chinese friend who can’t open my blog in her country.

        1. Capitalism will drag behind it Democracy. I’m sorry what was your solution? Starve them like Cuba? Yeah that has definitely brought more freedom to Cuba…

          1. You don’t negotiate with commies, ever! Maybe it hasn’t worked in Cuba but the USSR and its iron curtain no longer exist.

            http://libertarians4freedom.blogspot.com/

    2. Like they did in Cuba, right? I hope this was parody.

      1. Sure seemed like parody to me.

  19. That way eventually the people will rise against communism.

    Just as the poor and starving masses have in Cuba and North Korea. Yes, a real missed opportunity.

    1. Doesn’t G Smith have an argument with respect to Eastern Europe?

  20. “How is it China’s fault that Washington spends $1 trillion more than it takes in in revenue? ”

    Uh, they keep loaning to our government. As with loan sharks and credit cards – due to the massive debt piled up by those who have no intention and no way of ever paying back – the group giving the loan is as guilty if not guiltier than the one taking it.

    1. Guilty of what? The only ones who are guilty are the people who spent money they didn’t have.

    2. “the group giving the loan is as guilty if not guiltier than the one taking it.”
      Horse-pucky.

    3. Is it a prostitute’s fault that the John wants to keep coming back?

  21. “I’m certainly not an expert on foreign policy (using Red Dawn as a reference point probably gave that away), but all this hand-wringing and fear seems a tad bit premature, if not irrational.”

    The Chinese government treats it’s people worse than our own POS govt. It’s also increasingly wealthy and well armed. Anyone who doesn’t fear the next leading superpower which is more than willing to imprison and or murder all dissenters is a fool.

    “How long can communist hard-liners thrive in a nation that sees its economy grow by 10 percent a year?”

    Not long – but the “third way” advocates who are willing to embrace fascism will thrive for a lot longer.

    There is one fantastic, albeit “illegal” option you forgot – BOYCOTT CHINA.

    1. The Chinese government treats it’s people worse than our own POS govt. It’s also increasingly wealthy and well armed. Anyone who doesn’t fear the next leading superpower which is more than willing to imprison and or murder all dissenters is a fool.

      YES! YES!
      FEAR ME, FOR I AM DR. FU MANCHU!!!
      MUHWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

    2. This is just more backwards thinking. The truth is that the richer China gets from capitalism, the more capitalist (and free) it will become. Not allowing China to see the light will reverse this process, as well as alienating them to the point that they actually will have nothing to lose in attacking the US.

    3. The Chinese government seems to be wildly popular in China.

      Much of blame that gets passed around in China is directed at low and mid-level officials who are seen as a corruption of good government.

      Take a look at Russia. Putin and Medvedev may treat their people badly as far as I’m concerned, but they’re both wildly popular in Russia.

  22. It would be wise to not concern yourselves too much with China. We need to worry about the stupid fucks in this country. This counry is in deep shit!

  23. Nixon should have never established relationships with China, that was his biggest mistake.

    The Chinese government treats it’s people worse than our own POS govt. It’s also increasingly wealthy and well armed.

  24. I welcome the change. Now maybe everyone will blame China for all their petty little miseries. And when the loudest complainers start to go missing, well, don’t come tapping at Uncle sam’s door, world. You chose your winner. Deal. 😛

  25. Its interesting to see how China and USA have changed over time. China came from the absolutely dismal period of the 1950s to 1970s to a achieve a new economic freedom for its citizens probably never achieved in its history. At the same time the USA has burdened itself with ever more economic restraints, that it is ever harder to call it the bastion of economic freedom.

    It is hard to see how China will be free from its one party CCP rule. America on the other hand I see will also gradually slide into one party rule, not because of some crazy conspiracy, but more because projected demographics and economics, California is a good example that I suspect will happen everywhere else in the future.

    As for the population sizes, China despite having 1.4 billion people will with time become more equal with the USA population size, I once read that the USA will have something like 800 million by 2100, while Chinas populations is going to have big shrinkage like Russia, Japan, Germany are having.

    I do not see these two ever going to war, I see them becoming ever more similar to each other.

    1. I just want to clarify about the one party rule, I do not believe elections will be banned, just that the elections themselves being meaningless because the result is already a foregone conclusion, the same party will always win it.

    2. Ha, Ha, Ha, you said shrinkage!

  26. China is so dependent on us as a market for their goods, and invading us would do so much damage to their own economy–something they’re terrified of. One of China’s biggest fears is labor unrest, and the more intertwined their economy is with ours, the less of a military threat they’re likely to be.

    It would be more realistic if Hollywood imagined some sick Progressive America that invaded China to push independent labor unions and environmentalism on the Chinese by force. The movie could focus on Chinese resistance to such an invasion.

  27. In the new film, they must be invading to get their money back. They can call it: Red Dawn: Repossession

    1. If China is going to invade, they better do it pretty soon; otherwise their army will be composed of a bunch of geezers.

    2. It’s supposed to be over oil.

  28. Michigan? If the Chinese want Michigan, I say let them have it. We can try to trade them Michigan for Hong Kong, although I doubt they would take the deal.

  29. Last thing I’d be worried about is China invading the U.S. One side-bennie of the 2nd Amendment never before put to use is having a very well-armed population to ‘welcome’ the invading army instead of just cattle herds of victims you see typically see.

    Second, the Big Ugly with China may or may not be with the U.S. over Taiwan. But when I look at big world map and demographics, I would be more worried if I was Russian. That’s who’s gonna get the Big Ugly from China IMHO.

    The Russians have sat on a huge, wealthy chunk of Eurasia for nearly three centuries. They have done little more with it than use it as a dumping ground for political problems and toxic waste. There are fewer than twenty million Russians east of the Urals. There is equivalent Chinese population of U.S. within 1000 km of Russia/Chinese border.

    As is, Chinese would’ve rolled over Siberia already were it not for Russian nukes IMHO…

    1. I can’t support this with a link, but I read that the Russians are quite concerned with the numbers of Chinese migrating into Siberia. This clearly is an area of emphasis for the Chinese, and likely will be a flashpoint throughout the next century.

      Plus, with global warming, much of Siberia is expected to be more accessible.

      1. At the very least, its great for raising mammoths.

  30. “… classic?Red Dawn? Rather than Nicaraguan and Cuban forces invading …”

    The original Red Dawn was about an invasion by *Soviet* forces. There was a Cuban colonel character; maybe Nicaraguans were mentioned, I don’t remember; but the fictional main enemy was the Soviets.

    Geeky quibble, maybe. But this is like saying, “Iraq was invaded in 2003 by a coalition of British and Italian forces”.

  31. RE: Red Dawn redux!

    Sorry, havent read the whole article yet…

    I am all excited about a more current version of Red Dawn! I hope they keep the segment where the kid has to piss in the radiator, thats the best part.

    Wolverines!

  32. For one the trade with have China is not free-trade, it is gamed trade. We need tariffs on them to offset what we have to spend on environmental regs, labour regs, taxes, cost to offset what they subsidize, etc. etc. They don’t seem to have a problem putting tariffs on us. Normally, I agree with the Libertarian outlook, but not on this. When you want to deal with China on something, they demand that if you want to deal in their market that you give them tech…and you get, bupkiss. (See G.E. and China getting all cozy http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01…..plane.html) Or if you don’t give it them, they steal it and counterfeit it. Plus, they have been giving us goddamned poisoned products. Do you continue to go to a butcher that sells you rotten meat once in awhile on the basis that is just once in awhile and that it is cheap? Should we really be slaves to the “value” or should we be masters and demanders of quality?

    1. It’s up to the American people. I say that by judging how it went once Wal-Mart shifted from it’s “made in America” mantra back in the 80s, to what you have today, the people have spoken with their pocketbooks, in true capitalist fashion. They prefer cheap, even if that means sometimes dangerous. They cannot afford “quality”.

      1. I disagree. We can afford quality, we just have this weird thinking that if you buy five of the cheap crap over five years you are somehow “saving” when you could have bought one of the quality for one year and have it for 5 to 10 years. Or buy used.

  33. When I was the captain of a dragon boat team, the most paramount rule was: Don’t look at the other boat. The other boat doesn’t matter. The only way to achieve victory excellence is to keep an eye on your own boat, and make sure it is running well.

  34. I can’t believe that I’m the first one to point this out, but Red Dawn did NOT take place in Michigan, it took place in Colorado! Yes, MI has a college team whose name is the Wolverines, but these were high school kids. Geez, for a bunch of geeks, you all don’t know your movies! Also, I can’t believe that I finally witnessed the great David Harsanyi being WRONG!!!!! OMG the sky really is falling! (Also, that probably means that the earlier comment about the movie being filmed in MI and subsidized by same is a crock of shit)

  35. sorry just re-read the post, and he said the NEW Red Dawn movie, that one very well may have been filmed in MI

  36. The post is absolutely fantastic! Lots of great information and inspiration, both of which we all need!b Keep ’em coming… you all do such a great job at such Concepts… can’t tell you how much I, for one appreciate all you do!

  37. “As for the population sizes, China despite having 1.4 billion people will with time become more equal with the USA population size”

    I think at current trends, America’s population will exceed China’s by early next century. Unless America stablizes its population first. Which is extremely unlikely given how proud America is of it continuing population growth, and how committed its politicians and business leaders are to keeping its population growing as rapidly as possible until the end of time.

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