Contributors

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W. James Antle III, associate editor of The American Spectator, grew up in the Boston area, where "being a Republican is fundamentally no different from being a third-party voter." Antle, 33, has long been interested in the relationship between libertarians and the mainstream parties. In "The Son Also Rises" (page 38), he reports on the Kentucky senatorial campaign of Rand Paul, son of former presidential candidate Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas). A Ron Paul supporter in 2008, Antle says "people are hopeful about Rand Paul, that he's just a savvier libertarian than his dad, not a Republican lifer."

Senior Editor Katherine Mangu-Ward was raised in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. Her parents previously lived in the city itself, but they fled in the 1980s because "enrolling me in the District's public schools seemed like a horrible idea." More than 20 years later, D.C.'s schools are still among the worst in the nation. But in "Last Chance for School Reform" (page 46), Mangu-Ward, 29, profiles a frenetic new superintendent with unprecedented powers who arrived at an auspicious moment to reshape the city's schools. "D.C. is drawing attention from education reformers and national news outlets as a test case for school reform in America," she says. Now that she is safely past school age, Mangu-Ward has returned to Washington, where she lives with her husband.

Lisa Snell is the director of education at the Reason Foundation, the nonprofit that publishes this magazine. In "Obama's Education Spending Frenzy" (page 50), she describes the prospects for reform under President Barack Obama's education secretary, Arne Duncan. "A lot of things at the margins are breaking the public school monopolies," she says. "Ten years ago no one would have conceived of the options we have now. Still, we just keep spending billions and billions on schools that don't work." Snell, 42, has two kids in public school in California. She says her kids give her "a lot of fodder" for her work.

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  1. My only point is that if you take the Bible straight, as I’m sure many of Reasons readers do, you will see a lot of the Old Testament stuff as absolutely insane. Even some cursory knowledge of Hebrew and doing some mathematics and logic will tell you that you really won’t get the full deal by just doing regular skill english reading for those books. In other words, there’s more to the books of the Bible than most will ever grasp. I’m not concerned that Mr. Crumb will go to hell or anything crazy like that! It’s just that he, like many types of religionists, seems to take it literally, take it straight…the Bible’s books were not written by straight laced divinity students in 3 piece suits who white wash religious beliefs as if God made them with clothes on…the Bible’s books were written by people with very different mindsets…in order to really get the Books of the Bible, you have to cultivate such a mindset, it’s literally a labyrinth, that’s no joke.

  2. “The size of the lie is a definite factor in causing it to be believed, for the vast masses of the nation are in the depths of their hearts more easily deceived than they are consciously and intentionally bad. The primitive simplicity of their minds renders them a more easy prey to a big lie than a small one, for they themselves often tell little lies but would be ashamed to tell a big one.”

  3. Well said. Tucker is despicable, Crossfire became despicable (despite the presence of supposed “heavyweights” like Novack and Carville), and Jon Stewart is a comedian who has never proclaimed himself to be anything else. Just because certain people here don’t understand how satire works doesn’t change that fact. The fact that The Daily Show has gained some cultural traction doesn’t change that.

  4. Well said. Tucker is despicable, Crossfire became despicable (despite the presence of supposed “heavyweights” like Novack and Carville), and Jon Stewart is a comedian who has never proclaimed himself to be anything else. Just because certain people here don’t understand how satire works doesn’t change that fact. The fact that The Daily Show has gained some cultural traction doesn’t change that.

  5. Even if you go on his website, it’s still just a a ten minute discussion. The interview with Jim Cramer simply amounted to Jim sputtering something every couple of minutes while John wagged his finger at him the whole time. I’ve never seen him have an intelligent discussion with anybody, and he only talks to people that he knows he can bully into a corner. Usually idiots, yes, but it’s still dispicable. I don’t watch him that often, but it is people like him that make me wretch. The fact that people go around saying “He slammed so and so” in that “debate” pisses me off. John’s not directly responsible for that, but he certainly plays his audience to get that effect.

  6. Even if you go on his website, it’s still just a a ten minute discussion. The interview with Jim Cramer simply amounted to Jim sputtering something every couple of minutes while John wagged his finger at him the whole time. I’ve never seen him have an intelligent discussion with anybody, and he only talks to people that he knows he can bully into a corner. Usually idiots, yes, but it’s still dispicable. I don’t watch him that often, but it is people like him that make me wretch. The fact that people go around saying “He slammed so and so” in that “debate” pisses me off. John’s not directly responsible for that, but he certainly plays his audience to get that effect.

  7. “The size of the lie is a definite factor in causing it to be believed, for the vast masses of the nation are in the depths of their hearts more easily deceived than they are consciously and intentionally bad. The primitive simplicity of their minds renders them a more easy prey to a big lie than a small one, for they themselves often tell little lies but would be ashamed to tell a big one.”

  8. ools seemed like a horrible idea.” More than 20 years later, D.C.’s schools are still among the wor

  9. y fled in the 1980s because “enrolling me in the District’s public schools seemed like a horrible idea.” More than 20 years later, D.C.’s schools are still among the worst in the nation. But in “Last Chance for School Reform” (page 46), Mangu-Ward, 29, profiles a frenetic n

  10. eason Foundation, the nonprofit that publishes this magazine. In “Obama’s Education Spending Frenzy” (page 50), she describes the prospects for reform under Preside

  11. orrible idea.” More than 20 years later, D.C.’s schools are still among the worst in the

  12. ore than 20 years later, D.C.’s schools are still among the worst in the nation. But in “Last Chance for School Reform” (page 46), Mangu-Ward, 29, profiles a frenetic new s

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