India

A Poor Business (Role) Model or Who Moved Mein Cheese?

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While Ayn Rand has seen a resurgence here in the states, it seems Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf is gaining popularity in India, at least for business students. From the Daily Telegraph via Mangement Today via the Huffington Post:

Booksellers told The Daily Telegraph that while it is regarded in most countries as a 'Nazi Bible', in India it is considered a management guide in the mould of Spencer Johnson's "Who Moved My Cheese".

Sales of the book over the last six months topped 10,000 in New Delhi alone, according to leading stores, who said it appeared to be becoming more popular with every year.

 Several said the surge in sales was due to demand from students who see it as a self-improvement and management strategy guide for aspiring business leaders, and who were happy to cite it as an inspiration.

The really interesting bit is stuck in the middle of the article:

Senior academics cite the mutual influence of India and Hitler's Nazis on one another. Mahatma Gandhi corresponded with the Fuhrer, pro-Independence leader Subhas Chandra Bose's Indian National Army allied with Hitler's Germany and Japan during the Second World War, and the Nazis drew on Hindu symbolism for their Swastika motif and ideas of Aryan supremacy.

Dr J Kuruvachira, Professor of Philosophy of Salesian College in Nagaland and who has cited Mein Kampf as a source of inspiration to the Hindu nationalist BJP, said he believed the book's popularity was due to political reasons.

"While it could be the case that management students are buying the book, my feeling is that it has more likely influenced some of the fascist organisations operating in India and nearby," he said.

Go to the source, here.

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  1. Jeff — You should mention earlier in your post that you’re talking about Mein Kampf. There are a lot of “its” in that first block quote that don’t have an antecedent. Ich bin confused.

  2. WTF? Jesus, is it me, or does it feel like the 1930s all over again?

    Gandhi corresponded with Hitler? On what? Vegetarian cuisine? Non-violent genocide?

  3. @Pedant Pete…Thanks man

  4. I noticed that missing reference, too, though I assumed it had to be Hitler’s most popular management book.

  5. Gandhi corresponded with Hitler?

    Sorta in the same way Friedman corresponded with Pinochet, maybe?

    OMG! Ghandi was a NAZI!!!!

  6. It’s not a great recommendation for a management book if the author’s real-world management expertise takes an entire country (plus a few others) down in flames in 12 years.

  7. Hazel,

    You know, I never made that connection. Damned Aryan conspiracy if you ask me.

  8. I never did understand the Nazi fondness for the Swastika. It always seemed sort of random.

  9. “Gandhi corresponded with Hitler?

    Sorta in the same way Friedman corresponded with Pinochet, maybe?

    OMG! Ghandi was a NAZI!!!!”

    Well, neither of them were too fond of the British…

  10. Yes, let’s consider this relationship a bit more. You know where the word swastika comes from? That’s right, from the Sanskrit word, svastika?. I’m sure it’s just a coincidence and that Gandhi didn’t give the idea to Hitler in a letter or anything like that.

    Not a lot of Jews in India c. 1940, were there?

  11. Who Moved Mein Cheese?

    Not bad.

  12. There’s a little Marge Schott in all of us.

  13. PL

    Oh yeah, and Hindi is part of the Indo-European language group. Which suggests that Indians and Aryans are related. I’m sure some Nazis fled to India after WWII to escape persecution too.

  14. Gandhi wrote like one letter to Hitler in the 1930s. MLK was influenced by Gandhi. Joseph Lowery was an associate of MLK. The benediction at Barack Obama’s innauguration was given by Joseph Lowery.

    OMFG!!! Do you realise what this means?!

  15. OMFG!!! Do you realise what this means?!

    Barack Obama is a secret Hindu?

  16. I find it unlikely that Hindus are the buyers. It is far more likely that India’s Muslims are buying it, seeing as Mein Kampf, The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and other such anti-Jewish trash are big sellers in Muslim countries.

  17. Fuck me. Now we will have doughnut and slushi nazis and my tech help will speak like that 8 foot tall blonde chick. WTF. I am not afraid. Our brave new VP has already sided with America in his dissent against the Dunken Doughnut and 7-11 “crowd.”

    (ran out of racial stereotypes)

  18. Really creepy. Kind of like the Protocols of The Elders of Zion being increasingly popular in Russia and the Middle East. I can imagine them saying:

    “If you just skip over the parts about the Jews and Communists, there’s some really good stuff in there.”

    Are they planning to shoot their underlings if they disobey?

    WTF! ARRRGG!

    http://naughtygeneration.com/

  19. Fuck me. Now we will have doughnut and slushi nazis and my tech help will speak like that 8 foot tall blonde chick. WTF. I am not afraid. Our brave new VP has already sided with America in his dissent against the Dunken Doughnut and 7-11 “crowd.”

    Next on the Simpsons, Apu joins the Nazi party and Homer become the Fuhrer. Cue ‘Triumph of the Will’ parody.

  20. When I travelled through Asia, it came as a surprise to me that they didn’t share our contempt for all things Nazi. Some students couldn’t see why Hitler was viewed any differently than Napoleon. I think America’s familiarity with Jews is why we’re more sensitive to the difference.

  21. (ran out of racial stereotypes)

    Thank you, come again.

  22. “Next on the Simpsons, Apu joins the Nazi party and Homer become the Fuhrer. Cue ‘Triumph of the Will’ parody.”

    Nah, the Nazi thing would work better on South Park with Cartman.

  23. As someone who has read Mein Kampf (well started, then skimmed, but didn’t finish) it’s completely baffling to me how this could be a management book. Hilter was even a worse writer than he was a painter. The book is so poorly organized that it’s hard to glean anything from it other than “I don’t like Jews and we need to do something about them”. The beginning, middle and end of paragraphs will often be completely unrelated to each other. Sometimes he’ll even change course mid-sentence. You can’t read the book without coming to the conclusion that the writer is nuttier than squirrel shit. I agree that this has to be a Muslim thing rather than a business school thing. Either that or we need to introduce India to Peter Drucker.

  24. Stagman: Listen closely sometime (or read the subtitles, anyway) to Hitler’s speech in The Triumph of Will. Hitler really isn’t all that coherent and sometimes contradicts himself in the middle of a sentence. I have a hard time figuring out what his point is. Sounds like Mein Kampf is more of the same.

  25. in addition to hitler, l. ron hubbard’s management techniques are pretty widely used.

    he’s written a number of gigantic, barely intelligible management theory books and a number of companies (usually with practicing scientologists somewhere in the exec levels) use their ideas to organize.

    just because they’re devised by lunatics doesn’t mean they’re ineffective… lunatics usually need to stay on top of their crazy shit and find effective ways to do it.

  26. lunatics usually need to stay on top of their crazy shit and find effective ways to do it.

    Lunatics need effective management techniques to keep their brains organized.

    I speak from experience.

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