Consumer Freedom

'The Ethos of Organic Food': Worrying About Things That Don't Matter?

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This New York Times article about organic baby formula, which ran on the front page of the national edition, is puzzling on several levels. Apparently some mothers (at least two!) who buy the organic version of Similac have been dismayed to learn that it contains sucrose instead of the lactose used by competitors. According to the Times, "All infant formulas contain added sugars, which babies need to digest the proteins in cow's milk or soy." But the supply of organic lactose has been tight lately, so Similac decided to use less-expensive (and sweeter) organic cane sugar instead.

Does that make the formula less healthy? The Times hems and haws on that question, citing clashing opinions regarding the effect that different sugars might have on tooth decay and obesity. The bottom line is there's no clear evidence sucrose is any worse for babies than lactose. "No health problems in babies have been associated with Similac Organic," the Times reports. Furthermore, "Doctors say that parents need not worry about the precise composition of formula, because the product over all has been proved safe and effective. "

Still, says one pediatrician, "That organic formula would be sweeter might not be a health risk, but it certainly isn't what the parents [who buy organic products] have in mind." A taste researcher concurs: "Making sweeter formula so that babies like it more seems to me contrary to the ethos of organic food." 

What exactly does that mean? As far as the U.S. Department of Agriculture is concerned, the Times notes, "a product can be labeled organic when 95 percent of its ingredients are grown without the use of certain pesticides and herbicides." So a product can meet this standard, or even hit the 100 percent mark, but still not be organic in spirit? And if the ethos is so demanding, can any sort of baby formula truly be organic, since breast milk is both more natural and healthier?

Ron Bailey recently noted several myths about organic food, including the notion that it's especially healthy.

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  1. If it’s sweeter, it contradicts the ethos of that subset of the organic movement which is about suffering, and not about health or quality.

  2. If customers expect lactose and get sucrose, there is an argument they’ve been wronged. Would that be a reasonable expectation? I wouldn’t think so, as the ingredients are printed on the side and though most people don’t read them, that’s because they aren’t that important to most people. The entire organic issue seems like a red herring to remind Reason readers of what faction of the culture war they’re in.

  3. Organic processed foods always seemed a bit silly to me. Sugar is the same damn thing however the sugar cane is grown.
    I like organic agriculture because the produce is generally a lot better and I think that pesticides and chemical fertilizers are overused in conventional agriculture. But a lot of people seem to grant some kind of magical powers to organic food which don’t really have any basis.

  4. “Making sweeter formula so that babies like it more seems to me contrary to the ethos of organic food.”

    “It’s supposed to taste like that. It’s good for you.”

  5. Organic food: the hair shirt of the 21st century.

  6. Warty, Fluffy,
    Organic food is generally of higher quality (and price). I am not sure how this relates to some sort of self imposed suffering or masochism?

  7. Still, says one pediatrician, “That organic formula would be sweeter might not be a health risk, but it certainly isn’t what the parents [who buy organic products] have in mind.”

    This pediatrician is a moron.

    A taste researcher concurs: “Making sweeter formula so that babies like it more seems to me contrary to the ethos of organic food.”

    Ditto this taste researcher. He would have a point if we were talking about making it sweeter by using some kind of artificial sweetener, but in this context, this guy is WAAY off base.

    The main reason people want organic foods is because they want them to be free of additives, preservatives, hormones, artificial colors and products that only a food scientist could create.

    They don’t want their food to taste shitty. In fact most people I know who buy organics foods actually do want their food to taste good. They want their products to have real sugar, not artificial sweetener (like Sucralose, or Saccarin) and don’t want HFCS. I don’t know any that object to using one form of organic sugar vs. another. Nor have I seen this be an issue in any of the stuff I read about. These guys are just pulling shit out of their ass.

    And before everyone starts hatin’ on people who purchase organic foods or the organic foods movement as a whole — please keep in mind that these two turds don’t represent “the movement”. I dunno why the Times is elevating these guys as an appeal authority on organic foods, the movement, the ethos or anything else.

  8. If customers expect lactose and get sucrose

    And the reason they expect lactose is what, exactly?

  9. organic food is just a fucking branding thing. sure theres organic certification but @ the end of the day, its branding. part of that brand equity includes vilifying corporations who are quick to make things taste sweeter to get money, which is not all that important because in a perfect world the government would take care of every single one of your neeeds and desires.

  10. Organic processed foods always seemed a bit silly to me. Sugar is the same damn thing however the sugar cane is grown

    Personally, I agree with this line of thought as well.

    I’m most concerned with having my produce and meats be organic. If I am gonna buy processed/packaged/heat and eat foods — I don’t believe Organic is superior to non-organic.

    I like organic agriculture because the produce is generally a lot better and I think that pesticides and chemical fertilizers are overused in conventional agriculture. But a lot of people seem to grant some kind of magical powers to organic food which don’t really have any basis.

    I second this as well.

  11. And the reason they expect lactose is what, exactly?

    I don’t think most people would expect lactose. I think this guy is just opining about what he thinks people expect.

  12. As a health nut who is not self-righteous about it, this pisses me off. I’m fairly neutral on the organic issue, but I get sick of people equating healthy food with sensual deprivation. It’s not some repressive religion, it’s science.

  13. I don’t think most people would expect lactose. I think this guy is just opining about what he thinks people expect.

    That commenter also claimed that “there is an argument they’ve been wronged”, which is why I asked about the basis of the expectation. I can’t conceive of a rational argument why someone would feel wronged because they apparently didn’t read the label.

    It’s not the same as the “Chocolate bar must contain chocolate” argument.

  14. For all the organic grumbling, doesn’t Reason buy food for their DC events from Wholefoods? Or do they smear some pesticides on it before serving?

  15. Organic food is generally of higher quality (and price). I am not sure how this relates to some sort of self imposed suffering or masochism?

    I buy many organic products. I belong to an organic CSA.

    I do this because I think these products are of higher quality and taste.

    It sounds like you are the same.

    But we aren’t the whole organic food market. There are also stereotypical crunchy granola types who associate the concepts of “natural”, “organic” and “unpleasant”. These individuals don’t really accept that something is healthy or meritorious unless it tastes bad or otherwise creates some sort of inconvenience or discomfort. That’s the mindset that would think that an organically-produced formula isn’t “really” organic if it tastes good. That subset of the organic food consuming public would prefer it if the formula tasted like someone soaked the album art to a Phish CD in paste and then rubbed some dirt on it and handed it to you to suck on.

  16. I have a whole lot I could say about this, but I am too busy chasing a nearly 2 year old to write a novel. But a couple things-

    1.) Human milk has a lot of lactose (almost all humans can digest lactose up to about age 5 since that is the approximate age our species of primate would wean our offspring if we didn’t have all sorts of cultural factors weighing in) and is actually far sweeter than formula. Babies are made to want the sweetness of breastmilk so that they will nurse and therefore ingest food. So the thing about not wanting formula to be sweet because it is good for you is completely idiotic.

    2.) Formulas are always doing their best to get closer to the makeup of breastmilk because when babies need artificial milk, it is better to use formulas that at least attempt to have all of the ingredients necessary for growth. Plus, suboptimal nutrition (pretty much anything except breastmilk – formula is great at keeping most kids healthy but certainly raises the infant mortality risks) kills a lot of babies every year. That’s why we’re not using evaporated milk and karo syrup anymore like in the first half of the century.

    So by sticking a cheaper, unresearched ingredient in, these manufacturers are going on the theory that if it doesn’t kill them it must be ok. A lot of people are fine with that theory, I know, but if I needed to use formula I most certainly would NOT be.

  17. I meant the first half of the 20th century. Sorry if that was unclear.

  18. Never really paid attention in Chemistry class, but chemically sucrose and lactose are identical — both are C12H22O11, however, as a polysaccharide they are each derived from two different component sugars: glucose and galactose for Lactose, and glucose and fructose for sucrose. I’m not sure if either lactose or sucrose is sweeter than the other. Not being lactose intolerant, I like them both.

  19. can any sort of baby formula truly be organic, since breast milk is both more natural and healthier

    Pshaw. Reason is just shilling for Big Breast.

  20. Reason is just shilling for Big Breast.

    So am I.

  21. Abdul wins!

  22. It seems that a sweeter formula might predispose children to a sweet tooth later in life. In our obese, corn syrup society, kids with a stronger propensity for sweets is probably not what any parent purchasing organic formula is betting on. and probably not a good idea, either.

  23. I’ve found organic products to be pretty much a crap-shoot taste-wise. I’ve been to an organic restaurant where the food was downright inedible (to me), it was so bland – and it sure felt like that was part of the “charm” of the place, at least for the person who brought me there. On the other hand I’ve bought stuff like organic mac & cheese which was definitely of higher quality and better taste than the regular stuff. So yeah, “organic” means a lot of different things to different people.

  24. but chemically sucrose and lactose are identical — both are C12H22O11

    Close, but not quite. They have different physical structures and break down into different base sugars when digested.

  25. Ron,

    Do you remember/did you hear of the controversey back in the 1950s or 60s about a baby food manufacturer adding extra salt(?) to their baby food? When I was a kid I heard about it, more often than one would think something like that would come up, but it was used as some sort of “tricky corporation ploy” example.

    Until now, I never thought to ask anybody how babyfood with extra salt was forced on the parents, since the newborns are usually just on formula until long after they get home. But an element to the story was that the baby food was supplied to hospitals. Perhaps it was supplied free to doctors to give out?

    Anyway, this smacks as a watered-down version of that deal. “Trickycorp is switching organics with better tasting organics”.

  26. lynda Fassa –

    It seems logical to say that, but really that’s totally untrue. Like I said – breastmilk is the biological norm, and is far sweeter tasting than any formula is. The problem is far more likely to lie in the feeding practices of the parents. Do they feed kids when they are hungry and stop when they are full? Then the kids will probably do pretty well. If they force kids to wait until a scheduled time to feed them, then the kid is starving so it gorges itself, then the parent has 2 oz left in the bottle so they try to force it down the kid, then that kid has some problems it’s going to have to deal with.

  27. Bacteria can consume a wide range of sugars, so I don’t think the switch will affect tooth decay. As far as eating habits are concerned, parents should just taste the new formula. If it tastes like diner, it is fine. If it tastes like dessert, it might make the child develop a sweet tooth.

  28. jtuf,

    Is that business that dairy products are worse than raw sugar for your teeth been reversed or is it still the current view?

  29. As far as eating habits are concerned, parents should just taste the new formula. If it tastes like diner, it is fine. If it tastes like dessert, it might make the child develop a sweet tooth.

    If you parent’s basis for determining the health benefits of your formula is whether or not it tastes like “dinner” (or “diner,” if you prefer), then developing a sweet tooth down the road is the least of your worries.

  30. Close, but not quite. They have different physical structures and break down into different base sugars when digested.

    Right, I said that using different words in that same post. My point is you are getting exactly the same number of Carbon, Hydrogen and Oxygen atoms so there is nothing fraudulent in using Sucrose instead of Lactose. It’s only fraudulent if you use non-organic sugar.

  31. Anybody here ever tasted breast milk that you can recall? It is very sweet flavored. If they make the formula sweeter than that, I would think it intolerable. If real mother’s milk doesn’t cause a sweet tooth later in life, I wouldn’t worry over the other.

    Oh yeah. Breast Milk? best. packaging. ever.

  32. If folks are free to eat what they want to I am not going to be too troubled by those who only eat organic food.

  33. “For all the organic grumbling, doesn’t Reason buy food for their DC events from Wholefoods? Or do they smear some pesticides on it before serving?”

    Not everything sold at Whole Foods is organic.

  34. Making sweeter formula so that babies like it more seems to me contrary to the ethos of organic food.”

    And this is news how?

  35. Organic products tend to be of a higher quality than non-organic products, because organic foods are really an upper-middle-class luxury.

    However, there is nothing intrinsically superior about organic foods. It is just that organic foods are marketed towards an upscale demographic for high prices, and so naturally they need to be higher quality.

    If organic food movement became a mass-movement, you can expect the quality of organic foods to decline.

  36. Not everything sold at Whole Foods is organic.

    True…it’s just all priced as organic.

    True story, on Sunday my local Whole Foods was selling Organic Heirloom tomatoes @ $4.99 / pound.

    Non-Organic Heirlooms were $5.99 / pound.

  37. If folks are free to eat what they want to I am not going to be too troubled by those who only eat organic food.

    Unfortunately, the type of people who only buy organic foods are sometimes the type of people who want the government legislate against “factory farming”.

    So there is some overlap between organic food consumers, and the organic food political movement.

  38. Certain people refuse to shop at Wal-mart even though their prices rule. They will spend more at some other more expensive store, in order to reinforce their perceived superiority to people who shop at Wal-mart. We all know these people, and they probably include several posters here.

    Whole Foods is the solution for people who view shopping at Safeway or Price Chopper or Stop & Shop the same way as Wal-mart.

    And as soon as Wal-mart starts making organic cheap and affordable (they are currently working on their own line) these same people will suddenly lose interest in organics and will find a new fad to use to consider themselves better than the rabble.

  39. Epi,
    where in China is walmart getting organics?

  40. @ episiarch – yes quite true. But i am better than the rabble and i shouldn’t have to shop with them. We make statements about ourselves by where we shop. I don’t want to send the message that i am a part of the status quo.

  41. Anyone else think it is a bit funny that they mention tooth decay as a potential problem here? In infants?

  42. where in China is walmart getting organics?

    From the wombs of unwanted females.

    But i am better than the rabble and i shouldn’t have to shop with them. We make statements about ourselves by where we shop. I don’t want to send the message that i am a part of the status quo.

    And shopping at Whole Foods makes you not part of the status quo? HA HA HA HA.

  43. Rex Rhino,

    Well, that doesn’t make me want to attack organic food.

  44. And as soon as Wal-mart starts making organic cheap and affordable (they are currently working on their own line) these same people will suddenly lose interest in organics and will find a new fad to use to consider themselves better than the rabble.

    Epi, you seem to be projecting your own opinions about people who want organics onto organic consumers. It isn’t really about “status symbols” — no matter how many times you repeat it.

    Why is it so hard to just accept that it really is about consumers willing to pay more for what they consider a superior product?? Or is it that it makes you feel better about yourself by convincing yourself that these consumers are just superficial suckers who in your mind are really just trying to show off how they are better than you? Because as a I read these threads, the only obnoxious ones are the ones insisting they know the motivations of why others choose a particular product or insisting that organic consumers are fools idiots and dumb hippies. I don’t see any organic supporters out here calling out the rubes for buying non-organic or ridiculing the consumer choices of others.

    Also, the local Super Target by me has quite a bit of organic produce (and a small but growing selection of organic packaged goods) — most of it is priced better than Whole Foods/Trader Joe’s/Local Grocery store’s organics.

    The problem I have encountered with the produce from Super Target is one of turnover. Most of the Organic produce I have bought from Target goes bad FAST (like in a day or two) — much faster than the stuff I buy at other stores. I imagine it’s because they don’t move enough product and lots of the produce sits there waiting to be bought.

  45. breastmilk . . . is far sweeter tasting than any formula is.

    Unfortunately, any attempt by me to empirically test this claim would result in my body being dumped in the nearest river.

    Or being left out for the buzzards. It would depend on whether my wife turned right or left as she left our driveway with my body in the trunk.

  46. Sugar is the same damn thing however the sugar cane is grown.

    this just invalidated basically anything you have to say in the future.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactose

    dont get me started on beets and corn

  47. zball | May 21, 2008, 3:11pm | #

    organic food is just a fucking branding thing.

    Well I spent a year of my life analyzing the organic industry, science, price/quality ratios, health risks of processed foods (exposure to evil ‘chemicals’), the supply chain cost-implications, ‘sustainability’ factors, soil impact, and came to…. the exact same conclusion.

    Some produce is in fact better, if you dont mind paying the vig for it. tomatoes are particularly better. A lot of other produce isnt any better at all. A lot is worse. lower yield, lower quality, terrible inconsistency, high rate of spoilage, infestation, variance… etc.

    Processed organic foods are a complete crock of shit from top to bottom.

  48. Processed organic foods are a complete crock of shit from top to bottom.

    NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

  49. And the reason they expect lactose is what, exactly?

    Because it is baby formula, which is supposed to be a close substitute for breast milk. Lactose is the sugar one normally finds in milk. Seems like a perfectly valid assumption to make that they wouldn’t suddenly switch to putting sucrose in baby formula.

  50. Episiarch – The food at Whole Foods is more expensive because, frequently, it is better. This from a guy who does 98% of his grocery shopping at Wal-Mart.

  51. as Lotteries are “taxes on the the stupid”, organic foods are in many ways “taxes on the naive”

    they both require a certain degree of faith, and have a small psychological reward, albeit different ones.

    One is tossing a penny in a pool hoping for a quick-&-easy path out of poverty

    the other is a pretty expensive path to self-satisfaction for yuppies, more or less

    the comment above about organic meats is interesting = im not so bearish on that. Problem is the cost issue. (organic feed for the organic cow = $$$). That and the small risk of like, death from some horrible animal transferred virus or micro-organism infestation.

    But hey, its NATURAL to find living creatures in your shit, or for a few people’s brains to swell up and kill them.

    I was interviewed for this article here, which is a pretty good basic summary of the pros/cons on the produce side. For pregnant woman, there is much more of a basic upside to the stuff.

    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/04_36/b3898129_mz070.htm

  52. R C Dean | May 21, 2008, 6:09pm | #

    breastmilk . . . is far sweeter tasting than any formula is.

    Unfortunately, any attempt by me to empirically test this claim would result in my body being dumped in the nearest river.

    Hey, not if you’re a wahabbi =

    http://www.islam-watch.org/MuminSalih/Breast-Feeding-Man-Islam.htm

    disclosure: this is not a “muslims-are-so-fucked-up” bash. I could care less what weird shit they believe as long as it doesnt require blowing up any more real estate near where i work

  53. breastmilk . . . is far sweeter tasting than any formula is.

    As a new father, I have tested this claim fairly recently. Breast milk is a little sweeter than cow’s milk. Formula is about the same sweetness as breast milk with a “chemical” edge to it. Sort of like Diet Coke compared to regular Coke.

  54. Never really paid attention in Chemistry class, but chemically sucrose and lactose are identical — both are C12H22O11

    Are you sure they are identical structurally? A quick glance at oh-so-reliable Wikipedia seems to show different structure for the two molecules although they have the same formula.

  55. Related but sort of opposite Onion brief.

  56. I’m a new father. My wife and I feed our infant son organic formula because studies have shown that infants fed with organic formula and baby food have fewer pesticide metabolites in their bloodstream. I consider that a good reason to go organic for this.

    We previously used the Similac Organic for about a month but switched to Earth’s Best Organic Infant Formula today, largely based on research I did as a result of this article. BTW, the ingredients list for the Similac says “evaporated cane juice” which sounds a lot healthier than “sugar”.

    As it turns out, Earth’s Best lactose-sweetened formula tastes about half as sweet as the Similac. This is important because when you are weaning a baby the key is to teach them to eat the less-sweet items first, and give them the sweet tasting fruits later. Otherwise, they become accustomed to the sweeter foods and won’t want to eat the less sweet things.

    I’m convinced after tasting both formulas, talking to our pediatrician, and seeing my baby’s reaction to them that the sweeter Similac Organic would needlessly cause problems for us. I’m kind of pissed that they are using an ingredient like refined sugar in their brand-new organic formula.

    I’m happy that they are banning refined sugar in EU infant formulas — the EU seems a lot more on the ball when it comes to consumer health risks these days than the FDA.

  57. Hi. I live in the EU. And they seem a lot more on the ball when it comes to telling people what to do.

    My baby drinks nothing but pure Irish whiskey, by the way. It’s triple distilled, so twice as smooth. No chance of him developing a sweet tooth like those lesser primates who eat bananas and other delicious, easy-to chew fruits.

  58. The entire organic issue seems like a red herring to remind Reason readers of what faction of the culture war they’re in.

    Organic foods lie on one side or the other? Not in my experience. God wants you to have a healthy body, so does the state, as long as the god-mongers and state-worshippers are content at promoting healthy eating and healthy living instead mandating wellness, it’s a non-issue for me.

    My fellow libertarian brother and i talk a good game about healthy living but we both cheat, my big thing is nutritional value not organics, my vegan sister is a neo-con, and my everything-edible-must-have-ORGANIC-written-on-the-box-with-the-possible-exception-of-icecubes mother is an old right fundie, my liberal grandmother grows her own food.

    Not sure what like or dislike of organic food is supposed mean in the context of the culture war…

  59. BTW, the ingredients list for the Similac says “evaporated cane juice” which sounds a lot healthier than “sugar”.

    Well, if it sounds healthier, then by god, it must be so!

    I’m happy that they are banning refined sugar in EU infant formulas…

    Boy, there’s a shocker.

  60. Most of the research regarding “ose” variants have concentrated on the lipid levels in adults. They show little difference btwn glucose, sucrose and lactose.

    I certainly understand parents’ concerns about chemicals, but would ask them to remember that the human body is full of chemicals That’s why we’re alive. In addition, the human body can filter out an astounding amount of putative ‘poisons.’ What’s more, The Greatest Generation is living longer, far longer that their ancestors who lived in a totally “natural” environment. I’m pushing 60 and remember playing with mercury in chemistry class. Today, people panic at the slightest trace of the stuff. Hey, the dose makes the poison. You can die if you drink too much water.

    Regarding the “organic” label — well, what’s an inorganic food. This is a carbon based planet. Organic food offers no measurable benefits and can be a real budget buster. Organic farmers can grow far less produce than those who use fertilizer and pesticides. I can’t imagine the paucity of food and imported seasonal products (the bananas I bought this morning came from S. America).

    As well, it’s important to understand that a food can be grown organically but processed organically and vice versa. You can’t tell from the label. 95% could mean that 5% of a product is pure arsenic (excuse the exaggeration).

    I submit that the public falls into two major categories: Those who failed every science class they ever took and eye rolling skeptics who ignore the HealthScare industry. There’re a buncha buck$ to be garnered promulgating fear.

  61. The great organic myths rebutted

    I buy organic produce and for sure it does cost more but make no mistake it is better. The tomatoes, strawberries, blackberries, broccoli, apples, oranges etc etc. Those tomatoes taste like the ones my Grandmother used to grow. Mother nature will produce a healthier, tastier and more nutritious plant.

  62. “Organic farmers can grow far less produce than those who use fertilizer and pesticides. I can’t imagine the paucity of food and imported seasonal products (the bananas I bought this morning came from S. America).”

    That’s not true. In the transition period when converting to organic(takes several years) it will produce less, but once complete organic farms can equal or surpass traditional farms in crop output

  63. “Making sweeter formula so that babies like it more seems to me contrary to the ethos of organic food.”

    So I guess the ethos of organic food is to make things taste worse so consumers don’t like it as much.

  64. Anybody here ever tasted breast milk that you can recall? It is very sweet flavored.

    My biochem labmate’s tasted salty more than sweet. But Robin-Ann’s a salty lady in gen’l.

    Wal-Mart’s prices rule? For food? A few Augusts ago I visited my friend Nancy in Mich. and found the vegetables at the Wal-Mart on the road between Hillsdale and Jonesville high priced and not especially good compared to what I’m used to in the Bronx.

  65. William R | May 22, 2008, 1:52pm | #

    Organic Farms Produce Same Yields as Conventional Farms

    Great study.

    Nice science to avoid the 30%+ higher spoilage/loss rate that prevents yields from getting to market as viable product

    Carry on

  66. Gilmore, lets see some documentation. Spoilage rates. Why on earth would organic produce have higher spoilage rates than any other. Fresh is fresh.

  67. see comment above, or buy the report I wrote.

    some organic produce is more prone to self destruction in transit (loss) due to damage, or more rapid spoilage due to temperature storage or just plain time, because it’s not bred or designed to be delivered via the existing produce delivery infrastructure. its not a contentious point. call OTA if you have questions. they arent all that dissimulating about the cost-risks associated with production. ask for Katherine DeMatteo

  68. I buy organic produce and for sure it does cost more but make no mistake it is better. The tomatoes, strawberries, blackberries, broccoli, apples, oranges etc etc. Those tomatoes taste like the ones my Grandmother used to grow. Mother nature will produce a healthier, tastier and more nutritious plant.

    Organics, in my experience, do not taste better as a general rule. Organic eggs and meat certainly have better flavor, but I don’t discern much of a difference with fruit and vegetables. In fact, with certain items – carrots, for instance – I find organics are consistently worse in taste and texture.

    It’s more important, I think, to buy in season. That seems to make a huge difference in quality. So I don’t buy tomatoes except from May to September – and I find buying on the vine is the key flavor variable anyway.

  69. Lets see it Gilmore. Not the Business week article. I know several organic farmers. Small family farms that have been saved since they converted to organic. Never any mention about spoilage being higher. That’s a crock.

    Big Ag Business is funding the anti organic hysteria. Small farmers are making a comeback due to increased interest in organic products thus the big boys are pulling out all the stops.

  70. The ethos of organic food? Give me a fucking break. These people are elitist snobs. There is absolutely no evidence, at all, that organic food is healthier for you (just ask John Stossel) and there have even been studies which indicated it is unhealthier for the consumer and the environment.
    These organic food people are elitist pricks who think their shit doesn’t stink. The makers of Similac ought to tell them to go fuck themselves.

  71. “Anyone else think it is a bit funny that they mention tooth decay as a potential problem here? In infants?”

    Yeah, only the people who are ingnorant of pediatric dentistry, like you.
    The first teeth start arriving at around six months. Is this young enough to be considered an infant? I don’t know, but it is still damn young. It is extremely important from a dental point of view to maintain primary teeth, as they most importantly serve as spaceholders for secondary teeth. A sure fire way to have a fucked up set of teeth as an adolescent and into adulthood is to have fucked up teeth as a young child. The ONLY sugar that is capable of initiating the cavitation process is sucrose.
    So to answer your question, the only people who find it funny are the ignorant ones.

  72. In my first sentence above, “ingnorant” should be spelled ingorant.

  73. Fuck, I mispelled it again. It is iGNorant.

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