Hey: You Knew I Was a Politician When You Nominated Me

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Here's William Weld speaking to a Libertarian Party audience not long ago:

Q: I want to make sure that you are going to stick through to this to the end, no matter what threats you get from the Republican Party. And by the way, will you run even if you don't get the Republican Party nomination?

A: Yes and yes.

What the Libs didn't realize: Yes and yes is street slang for no way, suckers.

NEXT: Barry McCaffrey's Opium Report

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  1. Ouch!

  2. It seems to me that there’s a fundamental contradiction in the heart of any libertarian who seeks political office. I’ve said it before, but part of being a libertarian is the belief that the solutions to our problems, generally speaking, don’t involve politics. Put another way, if a libertarian believes that politics is a big part of the problem, why would a principled libertarian want to become part of that problem? …are there really libertarians out there convinced that political solutions would work if only we had the right politicians?

    There’s something to be said for getting the message out, and we certainly want to influence policy to whatever extent we can. …and to those ends, I think we should support our candidates as best we can. …but we shouldn’t be surprised to find that our candidates aren’t as principled as we are. “Libertarian Politician” may be an oxymoron.

  3. Jesse Walker,

    Are you making a very vague allusion to Trollope’s* He Knew He Was Right?

    *These days he’s better known for his travel writing.

  4. I think most Libertarians can justify participation in government – just not the abuse of its power, which most other parties seem to rely on. It means a libertarian has less concrete booty to reward their constituency with consequent to their election, aside from the invisible effects.

  5. PL:

    I think it’s a reference to that story that ends “you knew I was a scorpion when you picked me up.”

  6. a libertarian has less concrete booty to reward their constituency with consequent to their election, aside from the invisible effects.

    Massive tax cuts are nothing to sneeze at Robert.

    And once elected it is eminently possible to get reelected. Just look at Ron Paul.

  7. Ken,

    Libertarians in office should be there to eliminate government programs!

  8. He answered ‘yes’ twice but there was really only one question.

  9. “Massive tax cuts are nothing to sneeze at Robert.”

    But not something that motivates big donors or special interest constituencies – the politician’s bread and butter, respectively.

    “And once elected it is eminently possible to get reelected. Just look at Ron Paul.”

    Unfortunately, Dr. Paul’s district appears to be an anomolous artifact. I can’t think of another district where he’d stand a chance.

  10. jf is correct. But if you’d like to think of me as a learn?d fellow tossing off Trollope quips, that’s fine too.

  11. The Perfect Slogan for a Libertarian Candidate for Congress:

    “Going to Congress. . .to make their lives a living hell.”

    No platform, no discussion of tax cuts–just revenge on politicians conducting politics as usual, pure and simple.

  12. HappyJuggler0 & Quasibill: Speaking from Ron Paul`s home state of Texas, but outside his district, I see the following:

    1. RP’s runs and serves as a registered Republican.

    2. His district is a strongly conservative (?) suburb/exurb reaction to the Democratic districts in nearby Houston.

    That said, his survival may still be an anomaly. I’ve never understood why the Republicans continue to support his “Dr. NO” voting practice.

  13. Sphynx-

    Keep in mind that the margin isn’t 218-217. As long as the margin isn’t quite that close, both sides can tolerate a maverick or two.

  14. “Massive tax cuts are nothing to sneeze at Robert.”

    But not something that motivates big donors or special interest constituencies – the politician’s bread and butter, respectively.

    They do if the cuts are targeted to them. So divide and conquer. A cut for you, then a cut for you over there — eventually everybody’s taxes are cut.

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