Blogging Is Over, Part XXXVII

|

So it turns out if you just congratulate each other hard enough, eventually you'll get a pat on the head from the leader of the free world. Sez President Bush:

"I find it interesting that the old way of gathering the news is slowly but surely losing market share," Bush said in an exclusive interview for the new book STRATEGERY. "It's interesting to watch these media conglomerates try to deal with the realities of a new kind of world…

"I think what's healthy is that there's no monopoly on the news," Bush said. "There's competition. There's competition for the attention of, you know, 290 million people, or whatever it is.

"And the amazing thing about this world we live in is that there's a kind of free-flowing, kind of bulletin board of ideas and thoughts out there in the ether space, sometimes landing on somebody's desk and sometimes not, but always available. It's a very interesting period."

Having long been pilloried by the mainstream media, Bush now finds the rise of the alternative media nothing less than revolutionary.

"It's the beginning of the twenty-first century; it also happens to be the beginning of—or near the beginning—of a revolution in newsgathering and dissemination," he said. "Not in newsmaking—that tends to be pretty consistent."

Whole story here.

I'm hoping our own gaius marius will turn up with one of his too infrequent jeremiads about how the mob has now managed to destroy the last institutional check on the power of The Leader, but in the meantime I'll just say that when the president is giving a shoutout to the blagues, the phenomenon has gone beyond lame and has reached a state of Rascal-bound decrepitude. C'mon George, who's your favorite? Daily Kos? Quinn Cummings, inventor of the Hip Hugger? The Comics Curmudgeon?

This is not the first time blogging has died. Previous deaths here, here, here, and (the most ignominious death of all) here.

Advertisement

NEXT: Attn, DC Reasonoids: Davids vs. Goliath & Booze, Mon. March 6

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. I guess the question is if blogs are so lame now, why are you writing on one?

  2. Comments on blogs are dead too. 😉

    -Allen

  3. Bush had one of his broken-clock moments when he said those words.

  4. i hate the name blog…and that is why it should die.

    Blogging has died long live !!

  5. I would consider the Schiavo blog the point at which blogging jumped the shark.

  6. I kind of think that this is another time blogging died…or at least had obvious changes in a wart or mole.

  7. Typical. Doesn’t even mention Al Gore’s role.

  8. Bush said. “There’s competition. There’s competition for the attention of, you know, 290 million people, or whatever it is.

    I find it odd that the president doesn’t know more precisely how many people he ostensibly leads.

    I mean, isn’t there a whiteboard in the oval office where the exact number is kept up to date?

  9. Nice nBSG reference!

  10. MikeP,

    You’re kidding, right?

  11. mikep has been watching to much scifi channel.

  12. anon,

    President Roslin on Battlestar Galactica keeps an up-to-date number of the surviving humans on a whiteboard in her office. I think that is what MikeP was referencing. I thought it was hilarious but, you know… context.

    More generally though, given the world wide nature of the World Wide Internets computer thingy, I suspect 290 million readers is a low figure.

    -Allen
    (replaces the tape on his glasses and watches more sci-fi channel.)

  13. http://www.census.gov/

    U.S. 298,207,997
    World 6,500,642,499
    03:54 GMT (EST+5) Mar 01, 2006

  14. I saw that on Battlestar Galactica?

    I could have sworn I saw it on The West Wing.

  15. how the mob has now managed to destroy the last institutional check on the power of The Leader

    Hahahahahaha

    Yes, it really is a shame that CBS was unable to push that B.S. memo story to “check” President.

  16. Allen, MikeP,

    Thanks – it’s not that I don’t watch the Sci-Fi channel. It’s that I don’t watch television.

  17. anon,

    That’s sad. You must be too poor to afford a tv. Perhaps we should start a government program to provide you with one.

  18. The ever-thoughtful Mike Barnicle says that blogs politicize everything and that’s why he never reads them http://rhhardin.home.mindspring.com/imuscut.barnicle.ram (1 minute real audio)

  19. or whatever it is

    Ah… he’s so just-folks.

    U.S. 298,207,997

    What do I win if I squeeze out number 300,000,000?

  20. Brian24,

    Not necessary, but if you insist, don’t forget to toss in enough for a Sci-Fi channel encompassing cable package. Otherwise, it would all have been in vain.

    Actually, I don’t watch television because I decided it was too much of a temptation to waste my time. Also, I am sticking it in the eye of this guy who argued to me that the FCC’s recent activites were justified in part because it was totally unreasonable to think people could just not have a television if they didn’t want what it was bringing into their homes.

  21. What do I win if I squeeze out number 300,000,000?

    If you’re able to control your child bearing experience with that kind of precision, then we’ll start a new Olympic event just for you. You get the first ex post facto gold metal.

  22. anon-

    I always find it funny when people boast (yes, deep down, it is boasting) about not owning a TV. It’s as if they think the only shows on television are “Someone, Anyone, Please Marry My Dad” and “People Eating Bugs For Money,” which is far from the case. There are certainly some interesting and informative shows on. And while I don’t exactly worship at the altar of TV, how else is someone supposed to keep up with the important things going on in Washington, the rest of the country, the rest of the world, and on According to Jim?

  23. I get the Gaius Marius reference insofar as I know who he (Roman General, demagogue, consul, consul, consul, etc) was, but I don’t know who “our” Gaius Marius is. And wouldn’t GM have been less than averse to having institutional checks on his power removed?

    Maybe I don’t really get the reference after all.

  24. Glad to see that the guardians of hip are keeping their sights on the demise of the blog. I only wish I could be such a visionary.

    Earlier predictions of the emergence of viewer controlled plots in movies and the end of paperback books really prepared me for the future.

    May I be the first to announce the demise of the phrase “jump the shark”? It is so passe.

  25. Charles,

    “Our own gaius marius” has contributed to at least 652 Hit and Run threads.

  26. I can just imagine the conversation:

    ROVE: “George, there are all these conservative blogs out there carrying your water every day regardless of the rightness or wrongness of what you do. And even though the vast, vast majority of Americans have never heard of them, let alone read them, they help keep your base motivated, so toss ’em a bone.”

    BUSH: “Will do, Turd Blossom!”

  27. Anon, do you live in Chapel Hill? You may find interesting an old Onion article:

    Area Man Constantly Mentioning He Doesn’t Own A Television
    February 9, 2000 Issue 36-04

    CHAPEL HILL, NC?Area resident Jonathan Green does not own a television, a fact he repeatedly points out to friends, family, and coworkers?as well as to his mailman, neighborhood convenience-store clerks, and the man who cleans the hallways in his apartment building. …

    http://www.theonion.com/content/node/28694

  28. What do I win if I squeeze out number 300,000,000?

    Rhywun,

    You will win Hermaphrodite of the Year Award.

  29. George Bush is Gaius Marius? I was thinking more Lucius Cornelius Sulla. Of course, that would make Clinton Marius, which doesn’t really fit. So maybe, just maybe, Iraq is the Jugurthine War. So Hillary will be Marius, and Jeb Bush Sulla. Where does that leave Gingrich? The Clodius Pulcher of Atlanta GA? Fasten your seatbelts, kids, it’s going to be a bumpy flight.

  30. Marius might be a good model. His military reforms and unconstitutional string of consulships, among other things, made it much easier for people to seize power later. Sulla is the first example, followed, of course, by Pompey, Caesar, and all the fun that came with that generation of Romans.

    So, if Bush is Marius, our Sulla is someone who works for him (Sulla served under Marius in Africa). Which of Bush’s political appointees is most likely to march an army into Washington?

    Incidentally, I call Cicero if we’re going to be Rome. Yeah, I get killed later on as Cicero, but he’s the best of the bunch.

  31. All of you who have questions about gaius marius, please refer to MikeP’s comment above, and the google link he includes. I thought we were one big happy family here!

  32. “What do I win if I squeeze out number 300,000,000?”

    “Rhywun,

    You will win Hermaphrodite of the Year Award.”

    Not likely…hermaphrodites (at least human hermaphrodites) are sterile.

  33. I always find it funny when people boast (yes, deep down, it is boasting) about not owning a TV.

    Oddly, these are the same type of people who like to buttonhole you and tell you how great a book Infinite Jest is and how evil cars are.

  34. I know gaius marius, Tim, and you’re no gaius marius 🙂 Actually, I just seized on the opportunity to blather on about Rome. Where is gaius, anyhow? Didn’t he bear young or something?

  35. PL, gaius marius does indeed have a little one now, which is probably part of the reason he doesn’t show up here much any more.

    I disagree with damn near everything he believes, but he is well-spoken, if not properly capitalized.

  36. Will the little one’s first language be Latin? Should we chip in and buy the tyke a toga praetexta? 🙂 In any case, a belated congratulations to our enemy of all things capitalized.

  37. it’s unfortunate when it takes a name-check to get me back here, folks. my apologies.

    Marius might be a good model. His military reforms and unconstitutional string of consulships, among other things, made it much easier for people to seize power later. Sulla is the first example, followed, of course, by Pompey, Caesar, and all the fun that came with that generation of Romans.

    if you’re looking for marian radical military reforms, naked populism and unconstitutional consulships, mr liberate — the first truly imperial figure — look no further than franklin delano roosevelt. nor is it any accident, imo, that fdr capitalized on fascism to lead american armies the world over and never really bring them home. something indistinguishable from empire has been the american way e’er since.

    fwiw, sulla was the military champion of the optimates — the aristocratic class. of course, by that time, roman aristocracy was already completely vulgarized and bourgeois, not at all the ancient leadership that sulla would have purported to be defending. i think this country actually had a narrowly-avoided sulla — douglas macarthur, who failed to undermine the presidency of truman quite completely enough to seize power with the help of the senate conservatives. in any case, that period — 1914-1952 — is underappreciated as a deterioration of republican government in this country. (except perhaps here.)

    and am i the only one that finds w’s inability to get away from the word “revolution” in describing social situations disturbing? the man is a closet anarchist, to judge by his words, deeds and the company he keeps.

    gaius marius does indeed have a little one now, which is probably part of the reason he doesn’t show up here much any more.

    indeed, mr mediageek. she’s getting her homer along with her stuffed hippo with the bell inside — and it’s wonderfully time consuming for daddy. 🙂

  38. So then, gaius, who is Bush in late Republic/Early Empire terminology? I’ll buy FDR as Marius, incidentally (or maybe as a successful Gracchi).

    Is that Homer in Attic Greek? I sure hope so 🙂 Ask smacky for help on that, if you aren’t fluent.

  39. and am i the only one that finds w’s inability to get away from the word “revolution” in describing social situations disturbing? the man is a closet anarchist, to judge by his words, deeds and the company he keeps.

    There are those who do not believe anarchy implies revolution.

    It is, after all, governments that push the culture in directions that society — to wit, free people interacting voluntarily — have not chosen to go on their own. Indeed, anarchy may be the most actually conservative political system of them all.

    Note that nothing here should indicate that I believe Bush thinks this way, or indeed that he thinks in any way.

  40. it’s a tough call, mr liberate. i tend to believe that america rules over what is essentially a british empire antedating from 1815, and that imperialism proper in the west really dated from napoleonic times without yet having has a successful party of civilizational consolidation — a la rome. as such, fdr might be the american marius — but he follows more important marian figures like napoleon.

    moreover, i don’t know that there’s an duplication of timescale. in some respects, the united states is showing many symptoms of early imperial rome — the historicism and nostalgia, the sense of a lost virtue, the frequent disconnect between rulership and social responsibility, notions of deeply advanced individualism. but it’s also showing nascent signs of later philosophical developments — world renouncement, mysticism, abandonment of education and technology, the refution of the empirical for the ideological.

    he certainly fashions himself on fdr and napoleon — just as every consul afterward modeled himself on marius in tactics if not ends — despite an ostensibly bourgeois party that has assumed some of the diluted prerogatives of nobility. but he seems to me very much conflicted on that count — he’s also thoroughly vulgarized and altogether condescending to the politics of plebiscitarianism to secure power at all costs, often spectacularly naive and idealistic.

  41. It would be nice for a change to hear a president say that he plans to model his administration on that of George Washington.

  42. We must always be aware of the lynch mob, but it seems so often that journalists can dish it out much better than they can take it.

  43. It would be nice for a change to hear a president say that he plans to model his administration on that of George Washington.

    Hell, I’d settle on hearing one say that he plans to model his administration on that of Dwight Eisenhower.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.