Will the LP Nader Bush?

|

In writing about "Bush's Third-Party Threat," CBS News seriously–and correctly– asks whether the Libertarian Party candidate for president (likely to be Aaron Russo) will cost George W. Bush the election.

Among the reasons for the GOP to get queasy:

Senate and gubernatorial races from 1998 to 2002 indicate that Libertarians have repeatedly swung elections in the Democrats? favor.

For example, in the 2002 governor?s race in the swing state of Oregon, Libertarian Tom Cox pulled in 57,760 votes to help Democrat Theodore Kulongoski eke out a 35,000 vote win over Republican Kevin Mannix.

In the 1998 Nevada U.S. Senate race, Democrat Harry Reid won by 401 votes over Republican John Ensign. Libertarian Michael Cloud earned 8,129 votes.

It's obviously unclear exactly how the voting will go in the fall but in 2000, it was clear that every vote counted (granted, you could make a strong case that, in the end, none of the votes counted, except for those of the U.S. Supreme Court). But if it's a tight race, there's little doubt that LP votes could be decisive.

The question in this year's presidential race, where the country appears to be split right down the middle between Democrats and Republicans, is: Can any third-party candidate make a difference?

Esteemed political observer Charles Cook doubts the LP "would be absolutely stunned if [the Libertarians] turned into anything of any consequence," while Bob "The Prince of Darkness" Novak opines, somewhat incoherently,

For Robert Novak, if Libertarians do not make their presence felt this election and Mr. Bush?s loses, the third-party will hold political weight in 2008.

?I just had breakfast with a guy and we discussed that people are already talking, as politicians do, about the what-ifs,? said Novak. ?Everybody believes if Bush loses, the Republican Party will move to the left in ?08, to the Schwarzenegger and Giuliani strain, and that is where you really get the possibility of a serious third-party movement.?

NEXT: Return to Rio Rancho

Editor's Note: We invite comments and request that they be civil and on-topic. We do not moderate or assume any responsibility for comments, which are owned by the readers who post them. Comments do not represent the views of Reason.com or Reason Foundation. We reserve the right to delete any comment for any reason at any time. Report abuses.

  1. Gary, RE: Jeb, I don’t think so. Would be a Republican Governor though. Maybe Mitt Romney from MA? Could a Mormon be elected?

  2. Can Romney get the Christian right’s support though? Without any Republican is doomed.

  3. Gary,

    I absolutely get the biggotry of the elephants’ views of homosexuality being a deal breaker.

    I am in the position where that is one issue among many, and I find it repugnant utterly. I also believe the Repubs are fighting history on this one and will lose no matter what they do. I grant that our positions are shaped by to a great extent by the issue’s personal relevance. My deal breaker is the right of self defence, so I know where you are coming from.

    In the abstract, I have always felt more afraid of liberal ickyness than conservative ickyness because I think the message of liberalism is so compelling to the majorities in a democracy. Elephants are revolting in some respects, but on those issues they run against majority opinion in the world. Donkeys are revolting in almost every way, and in those ways they have the support of a majority willing to loot. When I am inclined to give myself some sleepless nights, I ask, “What if Dems were on the right side of guns, but Repubs weren’t?” Oogies ensue.

  4. Regarding Gary’s comments about the Republicans and government schools: Thomas Jefferson was a “Republican”, but not the Abe Lincoln type. Horace Mann was a Whig. The “progressive” tendency to advance state-organized education has tended to cross party lines.

    Kevin

  5. Jason Ligon,

    Well, its only really a deal breaker in the southern states for me; I would never live in Utah in other words. Indeed, one of the reasons why I voted for Jim Douglas (R – Gov.) up here in Vermont was largely because he was not a rabid social conservative. I just feel like I absolutely don’t have that option in the South – or at least where I from, that is Alabama. I’ll be in N.C. starting next summer, and maybe things will be different there.

  6. Gary,

    ” I don’t think Republicans are any less likely to seize your land for some government purpose”

    That’s not what the folks at “The Institute for Justice” http://www.IJ.org, say. These folks do a great job fighting property rights infringement type cases. I saw a rep of theirs speak and she said that the Dems tend to be far more aggressive in snatching folks property and violating their property rights. This is not to say that there are not some bad GOPers as well.

    Also, I know that many Republicans vigorously oppose government seizure of private property, or the restriction of its use, on principle. The Dems, on the other hand, are especially bad in this regard in their alliance with environmental lobbyists.

  7. If Bush loses because of votes that went to the LP candidate, it will be poetic justice since Bush has so divorced himself from the principles of individual liberty.

  8. Rick Barton,

    I guess the problem I have with that statement is that I know so many Republican (Alabama) politicians who have no problem seizing land for the new shopping mall, “riverboat” casino, etc. – especially if the persons who own the land are poor, black, or both.

  9. Rick Barton,

    Case in point is the former Govenuh, Fob James; that sleezeball seized all sorts of land in Baldwin County for the purpose of “public” landfills, waste storage facilities, etc.; yet these were spun off within a year or so to companies that his sons own.

  10. joe:

    “The LP, on the other hand, is just as removed from GOP ideology as from the Dems.”

    I disagree; I think that if you go down, issue by issue, the LP is much closer to the Republicans than the Dems. Bush tends to make the Republicans look worse than they are.

    Note that the winners of the “Taxpayer friend” award from the NTU for restraining government spending are all Republicans in both the house and senate:

    http://www.ntu.org/main/page.php?PageID=40

    http://www.ntu.org/main/page.php?PageID=41

    Also, GOP Rep. Ron Paul was a prior LP candidate for president, and the guys that led the fight to have sunsets put on some of the most dangerous aspects of the Patriot Act were conservative Republicans.

  11. Gary,

    I understand; as I said there are some Republicans that are quite bad on these issues but, it’s my understanding that they tend, on the whole, to be better than the Dems.

    Sounds like it’s a very good thing that Fob James is the former Govenuh.

  12. Because you jumped all over the poster’s comments with a defense of the 2000 election result, when the post was not questioning the result it. I mean, it was fucking hilarious watching you in action.

    Sorry, Gunnels – it won’t wash. I think R.C. Dean simply found it tiresome that he and others had to hear the tired old “if it hadn’t been for the bad ol’ Supreme Court” crap you implied. He wasn’t discussing the result – he was discussing your attempt to resurrect en passant that dead meme and hoping you might consider a dose of reality, if only for our sake.

    And all your “fucking hilarious” comments and *chuckle* childishness won’t change that, either.

  13. A note about “the prince of darkness” sobriquet: This is a well-known nickname for Bob Novak–and the very one he used to introduce himself while emceeing the 20th anniversary dinner for the Competitive Enterprise Institute last Wednesday night in Washington, D.C.

  14. slap down,

    “I think R.C. Dean simply found it tiresome that he and others had to hear the tired old ‘if it hadn’t been for the bad ol’ Supreme Court’ crap you implied.”

    Well, no one made that argument; if they did, please point it out to me.

    “He wasn’t discussing the result – he was discussing your attempt to resurrect en passant that dead meme and hoping you might consider a dose of reality, if only for our sake.”

    My attempt? The original comment was by s.m. koppelman! All I’ve stated is that koppelman did not say what he was accused of by R.C. Dean. Careful reading on your part might be helpful in the future. 🙂 *chuckle*

  15. Rick Barton,

    Oh, he was just replaced by a equally corrupt Democrat, who was in turn replaced by an equally corrupt Republican. The whole culture of Alabama politics is sleezy.

  16. slap down,

    BTW, you’ll note that even R.C. Dean realizes who he was talking to – s.m. koppelman; which is of course why he addresses him. *smirk* *giggle* I know its “childish,” but I can’t stop laughing at you.

  17. Gary Gunnels,

    It seems to me that the best argument for you to use with any Republican state legislator who would actually vote for laws to criminalize adult homosexual consensual sex, is to make the point that such laws would be a government intrusion into yet another area where it has no good reason to intervene.

    When I read your post on this matter, my first reaction was to think that they would never go so far as to criminalize adult consensual sex, but of course that’s what laws that proscribe prostitution do. And unfortunately, I don’t think that there are too many politicians of either of the two main parties who advocate its legalization.

  18. Rick Barton,

    Well, that’s essentially what Texas v. Lawrence (2003) got rid of; criminalization of adult consensual homosexuality. And really, it doesn’t matter, as far as I can tell, that it would be further encroachment by the government, because southern Republicans (and Democrats too) don’t seem to take issue with encroachments into areas of “morality.” That’s why Alabama outlawed vibrators a few years ago (this is currently being challenged in the courts). Its an entirely different visions of what government may encroach upon; or rather, let me put this way – liberals like to encroach on your life to save the birds and you from rare chances of getting cancer from various chemicals, conservatives encroach on your life save you from “sin” so that you can lead a “happy” “Christian” life. Both are really quite puritanical in their own way.

  19. Rick Barton,

    If you want to see an example of a southern religious conservative, you need look no further than the minister on the PBS series “Colonial House.” You see, I come from a large family, and I have several cousins who are Baptist and Church of Christ ministers; anyway I grew up in that culture, and I can say that it really informs the politics of a place like Alabama (at least as far as white conservatives are concerned). Needless to say I am also the black sheep of the family. 🙂

  20. Patrick asks, “Isn’t it possible that the LP pulls as many Democrats as Republicans? Or am I the only one? :-)”

    If I recall correctly, the Libertarian candidate for governor in a recent election (1998?) drew fairly heavily from the Democrat (McGreevey), especially in the latter’s home district! More recently, I heard that Ed Thompson was getting GOP- and Demo-leaning voters about equally in Wisconsin when he stood for governor.

    The idea that LP voters are just “dope smoking Republicans” is a canard that needs to be put to rest. Quite a few LP leaders in the last couple of decades, in fact, came from the Demo party, when they realized that the donkeys were only giving lip service to civil rights, while ratcheting up taxation and patronage to put us all in the poorhouse that much sooner.

    If you REALLY care about civil rights, if you REALLY care about smaller, fiscally-responsible government — and even if you REALLY want only one of those but REALLY oppose the other, the irony is that you shoot yourself in the foot to cast your vote for either Demos or GOP.

  21. Oops, I meant to say, “If I recall correctly, the Libertarian candidate for governor in a recent NEW JERSEY election (1998?)…”

  22. Oops, I meant to say, “If I recall correctly, the Libertarian candidate for governor in a recent NEW JERSEY election (1998?)…”

  23. Merritt,

    I think he was elected in 2001.

  24. Esteemed political observer Charles Cook doubts the LP “would be absolutely stunned if [the Libertarians] turned into anything of any consequence….”

    Wouldn’t we all.

  25. Am I the only one having trouble parsing that sentence?

  26. Michael Peroutka and the Constitution Party also have significant appeal to many. The Peroutka campaign is running on themes of God, Family, & Republic.

  27. No Joe, I’m struggling too.

    Cook doubts the LP would be absolutely stunned if they were of any consequence. Were they of any consequence would they then be mildly stunned? Just plain stunned?

    Well, he is esteemed after all so it must be you and me Joe.

  28. What the hell, Nick? “Prince of Darkness”?

  29. It’s true, of course. If Bush loses, but by fewer votes than the LP receives in those states in which their votes would have given Bush enough votes to win, than he would have won if they had voted for him instead. Damned Libertarians!

    Meanwhile, the Nader voters are keeping Kerry from winning. If both the Libertarians and the Greens would just stay out of it, then both Bush and Kerry would win, and all would be well.

  30. I have to say that I struggle to accept the conventional wisdom of “a vote for (insert third party here) is a vote for my opponent”.

    I mean, I get that the math will often correlate with this idea, but I think it is more likely that the folks who vote for third party candidates would stay home rather than vote for the major party if the third party wasn’t running.

    The Libertarian and Republican platforms are pretty far apart from each other these days on both fiscal and social issues. Nader is getting support from the anti-war left while (because?) Kerry has said we must stay in Iraq to finish the job; that’s a pretty clear difference.

    So I’m unconvinced that Russo and Nader will swing the election one way or another. Whoever ends up winning and losing will do so because of the success or failure of their ideas, campaign, and ability to communicate.

  31. For Robert Novak, if Libertarians do not make their presence felt this election and Mr. Bush?s loses, the third-party will hold political weight in 2008.

    Another conundrum of a sentence.

    But it seems that what these guys forget is that conservatives would not find much of the Lib platform attractive, outside of the financial policies. Would they really vote for an anti-war, pro-drug-legalization, (probably) pro-choice candidate?

    As glow said, I think the Constitution Party is more of a threat to the Repubs.

  32. A senior adviser to the campaign, who did no want his name used so he could speak more frankly, said there was no concern in the campaign.

    ?None, none,? the adviser emphasized. ?[Mr. Bush is] as strong as Ronald Regan was in 1984.?

    Well, it’s nice to see the Iraqi information minister found work with the Bush campaign…

  33. A Mannix loss was a good thing; he was the ultimate nanny-state Republican.

  34. Actually, in 2000 the LP (Browne) and Reform Party (Buchanan) each garnered more votes than Gore’s margin in Wisconsin, Oregon and New Mexico, and much more than the margin of any Florida counting scenario. While I think it’s fair to say many Browne and Buchanan supporters wouldn’t have voted GOP in a 2-candidate race, I’d argue that together they lost those states for Bush.

    Had the Supreme Court allowed the Florida recount to proceed and send the state’s 33 electoral votes to Gore by a small margin, we’d be in year four of Republican handwringing over the Libertarian, Reform and Constitution parties.

  35. Could that sentence be fixed? Cook said, according to the referenced article, “I may be very wrong but I would be absolutely stunned if [the Libertarians] turned into anything of any consequence.” Saying he “doubts” the LP would be stunned reverses the meaning of his statement.

  36. Rather, I meant saying he doubts he would be stunned … or something … it’s just too early on Monday morning for anybody to be coherent.

  37. When non libertarian fiscal conservatives vote LP, they will be a factor. Until then, they are a side show.

    Sigh.

  38. Jason Ligon,

    About civil libertarians and social libertarians?

  39. What about…

  40. Had the Supreme Court allowed the Florida recount to proceed and send the state’s 33 electoral votes to Gore by a small margin, we’d be in year four of Republican handwringing over the Libertarian, Reform and Constitution parties.

    This reads as if you think Gore would have won the recount. If you recall, the major media went ahead and did the recount, and Gore still lost.

    Give it up, people. Gore lost.

    Leaving aside questions on the legitimacy of the Florida Supreme Court’s intervention into the electoral process, of course.

  41. Gary,

    My impression is that they are all Dems who would rather chop off their own limbs than raise a finger in defence of property rights.

    I may be wrong, but what percent of the ACLU rank and file could be legitimately characterized as potential Bush voters?

  42. Isn’t it possible that the LP pulls as many Democrats as Republicans? Or am I the only one? 🙂

  43. […]the Libertarian Party candidate for president (likely to be Aaron Russo)[…]

    It seems more likely to be Gary Nolan.

    You knew someone was going to say it. 😉

  44. Patrick,

    That’s an important point. The Greens are pretty much “just the Democrats, only more so.” The LP, on the other hand, is just as removed from GOP ideology as from the Dems. They are not in any way a more radical version of the Republicans. Most years, that would prevent it from tipping races one way or ther other.

    This year, though, liberal potential LP voters are going to vote for Kerry in large numbers, to make sure Bush doesn’t win.

  45. The LP should be proud – their few serious successes are electing Democrats.

  46. Watch out Gillespie,

    Novak holds grudges…for that prince of darkness crack he’ll tell the FBI that YOU blew Joe Wilson’ wife’s “cover”

    I can see Novak’s grand jury testimony now: “This “hippie” met me on the mall, obviously heavily drugged, and while singing the praises of “the mighty weed,” mentioned Valerie Plame’s CIA involvement.

  47. I’ve heard of such things, but I have to admit that I don’t really understand the donkey libertarian. The entire premise of the left coalition is to engineer outcomes by laughing at such antiquated notions as property rights.

    Pro choice is not a libertarian position (libertarianism is neutral on that issue, as we bicker about whose rights are being protected).

    Separation of church and state largely exists as a problem only as a result of that great donkey institution of the One Public School.

    Is it just drugs? Are dems any better? I don’t get it …

  48. R.C. Dean,

    “Give it up, people. Gore lost.”

    The comment was not contesting the ultimate decision; it was discussing a counterfactual.

    Eric,

    Well, given that Democrats are no worse or better than Republicans, why should that matter? Though your master is a political party, don’t assume that applies to everyone here.

  49. In college-land, I’ve heard a lot of good words about libertarians, as well as been surprised more than a few times by people pronouncing themselves libertarian, unexpectedly.

    But that could just be a function of the types I surround myself with.

    Regardless, I’m quit optimistic that, if we make it on the ballot in Texas and elsewhere, that the LP could make significant waves.

    The danger in that is the potential for backlash from conservatives, which Nader is currently feeling from liberals. Luckily, we’re a party of ideas and not of personalities, which (I think) mitigates this risk. Also, Bush has it coming to him.

  50. Jason Ligon,

    It should be noted that public schools as a rule were the creation of Republican politicians; especially in the 19th century. Indeed, in American South it was only with the coming of the Republican Reconstruction governments that public schools became common in the South.

    And to be blunt, I don’t think Republicans honor property rights any more than Democrats do – at least in practice. In other words, I don’t think Republicans are any less likely to seize your land for some government purpose – be it a mall or a nature preserve – than Democrats are, in part because as politicians they want to please generally the same populations so as to garner their votes.

  51. Jason Ligon,

    And I don’t see any real weakening of Republican support for public schools either; what I do see is a desire to create European-like quasi-public schools in the form of “private” schools that already exist. Though that may not be the “agenda,” that’s what is going to happen.

  52. I’ve heard of polls showing that the LP draws 2-1 from Republicans over Democrats. Meaning that for every 2 LP voters who think (however rightly or wrongly) that a Republican is the lesser evil, there’s one who thinks (however rightly or wrongly) that a Democrat is the lesser evil.

    Make of that what you will.

    I do know that when I tell left-leaning types that I’m a libertarian, many (but not all) have more respect for that than they would if I said was a Republican. They figure “Well, he’s wrong on guns and taxes, but at least he’s a die-hard civil libertarian, drug legalizer, and anti-war. Unlike the Republicans, who are wrong on everything.”

    I think the LP candidate should pick an especially close swing state and say that if one of the 2 major party candidates endorses a list of reforms he’ll stop campaigning in that state and endorse whoever supports those reforms. The reforms need not be the entire LP platform, just a few decent steps in the right direction. The odds are good that neither Bush nor Kerry would endorse it, and so LP candidates would have a solid piece of evidence that neither party is “good enough”, the next time somebody insists that the GOP needs and deserves support from libertarian voters.

  53. Wama,

    On the other hand, I don’t think anything like the Dean insurgency would have happened last year if it hadn’t been for the shock Nader sent to the DLC establishment in 2000. And if it hadn’t been for that, Kerry wouldn’t be paying nearly as much lip service to “progressive” positions on things like the Iraq war and USA Patriot that he voted for.

    If a vote for the LP would cause a similar shakeup to the neocon establishment in the GOP, I’d consider it a vote well-cast.

  54. All interesting discussion but some of us believe, as Steve alluded to, that a vote for the LP is a principled vote for a candidate that comes closer to reflecting our/my personal philosophy.

    It may well be a throw away, but my vote for the LP in the upcoming is in no way an endorsement of Terri Kerry’s husband.

    Further, I will be mightily unhappy if he is elected, but that potential disgust will not permit me to cast a vote for GWB on the off chance that it might keep Kerry from office.

    OTOH, some of friends are scathing in their admonition that one shouldn’t vote at all because it only encourages the slimy politicians.

  55. Patrick and joe are right about the LP and democrats, at least for this cheeky little monkey. This will be the first election I don’t vote libertarian; I’m going to try to keep down my lunch and vote for Kerry, because I’m in a swing state and I think Kerry would be at least marginally better than more Bush. Over the course of my active political life (my first presidential election was 1992), if my only choices were dems and reps, I would probably more often have gone with the dem.

    But there was the Zogby poll linked in a recent H&R post (just did a quick search but couldn’t find it) where people calling themselves libertarians overwhelmingly chose Bush over Kerry. The sample size was probably very small though….

  56. As a libertarian-leaning Democrat (translated: a guy who does vote for the lesser of two evils), I am enamored with the notion of divided government. It leads to better (though not necessarily good) fiscal control, for one thing.

    If I thought a Libertarian could win, I’d vote that way (and have, on occasion). But, as someone said earlier, that party is a party of ideas and not personalities. Too bad, because in the real world we elect people, not ideas.

  57. thoreau,

    I have a very good reason for avoding Republican candidates – at least when I return to the South from Vermont. They are anti-homosexual bigots as a rule who would criminalize adult consensual sex. This is not the Democratic position as a rule. You have to weigh a potential criminal record v. whatever the Democrats might do. In New England I can happily say that I am not faced with this problem.

  58. Just as an aside to ranking screamer R.C. Dean, the 2000 election went to Bush by five votes. A Bush win in one or two of those states the LP and Reform sent to Gore would have made Florida irrelevant.

  59. Whoops.

    Just as an aside to ranking screamer R.C. Dean, the 2000 election went to Bush by five *elecdtoral* votes. A Bush win in one or two of those states the LP and Reform sent to Gore would have made Florida irrelevant.

  60. Whoops.

    Just as an aside to ranking screamer R.C. Dean, the 2000 election went to Bush by five *electoral* votes. A Bush win in one or two of those states the LP and Reform sent to Gore would have made Florida irrelevant.

  61. koppelman,

    Yes, Dean’s rabidness vis a vis party loyalty was rather hilarious – he had to defend the 2000 election result even though the original poster hadn’t taken issue with the result itself. *chuckle*

  62. liberal potential LP voters

    What, both of them?

    Koppelman, what’s your problem with my post, exactly? You seem to be agreement than Bush won the election, I was merely calling out what seemed to be a bad inference in a post above, namely, that if the recount had proceeded as Gore wanted, he would have won.

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Bush is a huge disappointment to this pragmatic libertarian in many, many ways, but I just don’t see how Kerry would be any better on issues like taxes, spending, gun rights, or the regulatory state.

  63. It annoys me a little that most people seem to think a vote for an LP candidate takes a vote away from Bush. I’ve moved aways fromt the Democrats, but I’d still never vote Republican. If I vote LP this fall, it’s taking a vote away from Kerry.

    There may be a lot of former Republicans who’ve realized the party no longer cares about fiscal consertivism, but it’s also increasingly obvious that the Democrats are only socially liberal toward those behaviors they approve of.

  64. “Everybody believes if Bush loses, the Republican Party will move to the left in ?08, to the Schwarzenegger and Giuliani strain, and that is where you really get the possibility of a serious third-party movement.”

    An allied question would be, who would follow Bush in 2008 if he were to win in 2004? Jeb? I really don’t think Jeb would appeal to the christian right base of the party.

  65. R.C. Dean,

    Because you jumped all over the poster’s comments with a defense of the 2000 election result, when the post was not questioning the result it. I mean, it was fucking hilarious watching you in action.

  66. Rick,

    I agree that the LP is probably closer to the GOP than to the Dems. But my point was to compare their ratio of poached votes to that of the Greens. LP voters would probably pick the Republican candidate over the Dem (generic party candidates assumed) by 2:1 or 3:1. Green voters, otoh, would probably pick the Dem over the Rep by 5:1 or 10:1 or 30:1.

    So in the final outcome, a strong Green candidacy would hurt the Dem candidate more than a strong Lib candidacy would hurt a Republican.

  67. Nick:

    “(granted, you could make a strong case that, in the end, none of the votes counted, except for those of the U.S. Supreme Court).”

    This banal comment ruined your entire effort for me.

  68. I dunno, but I’m not choosing between Bush and the Libs. I’m choosing between Kerry and the Libs!

    Where the idea that the Republicans are closer to the libertarians than the democrats, I don’t know.

  69. mac-

    In their rhetoric the GOP is indisputably more libertarian than the Democrats.

    But in the actions of the Bush administration, well, that’s a whole other story.

    And Rick Barton would argue (with some justification) that Congressional Republicans are frequently better than Bush. But that isn’t saying much.

  70. Gary says “Merritt,

    I think he [McGreevey] was elected in 2001.”

    Not sure of the year, but I do know he won the first election that was held after the incumbent who defeated him in the election that I mentioned (Christine Whitman) went on to be W’s EPA czarina. I don’t know whether there was a Libertarian in the election that finally gave Jim McGreevey the NJ Gov’s chair, but in the previous one, Murray Sabrin was his LP opponent. Sabrin had enough pre-election support to earn a slot in the official debates — the first time a third-party candidate had ever been able to do that since 1970s-era campaign reforms were enacted in New Jersey.

    One view of Sabrin’s campaign, and how it seemed to go off the tracks as election-day drew near, is at http://www.libertysoft.com/liberty/features/63sabrin.html.

    Sabrin always seemed an awkward fit as a Libertarian, and he subsequently tried a run for US Senate as GOP in 2000. He lost in the primary.

Please to post comments

Comments are closed.