Our Tone-Deaf Music Industry

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Here's an update on the music industry's ongoing war with reality. Seems the big labels just cannot let go of the idea of charging people $2 a song or $18 for an album. Forget the whole Crazy Eddie volume-volume-volume thing, the labels have their price point and are sticking to it.

Particularly amusing is the notion that DVD-Audio and SACD discs, which are not exactly flying off store shelves despite being a nice advance from plain CDs, should spin off separate and additional mechanical royalty streams to labels. Yeah, price them even higher, that'll make 'em move.

Meanwhile, Microsoft pushes ahead with a digital rights management scheme that'll let you rent content for your portable devices. We'll see about that one, but Disney is on it like Minnie on Mickey.

Keep it up guys and sooner or later everyone is gonna realize it is cheaper and probably easier to just make their own damn music.

NEXT: Flash a Tit, Lose the News

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  1. Janus is a joke.

    Maybe when they started this project, it looked like a good idea, but Apple changed the model.

    Swing and a miss Bill.

  2. Here’s another update.

    Today’s Post has a report on how many of the labels owe back royalties to artists. Here’s the url: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A2079-2004May4.html.

    Makes all of blustering about how file-sharing is hurting artists seem all the more ridiculous.

  3. Here’s another update.

    Today’s Post has a report on how many of the labels owe back royalties to artists. Here’s the url: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A2079-2004May4.html.

    Makes all of the blustering about how file-sharing is hurting artists seem all the more ridiculous.

  4. MP3 blogs are where it’s at. Plug.

  5. Herb Kelleher for record company president!

  6. “just make their own damn music.”

    I thought that link would take me to the subject matter, not an advertisement. But me not mind.

    The art of actually making rather than listening to music has been in steady decline since the advent of commercially deliverable electricity. Why compose when you can flip a switch and just listen? But in the computer age the means of producing demo-quality digital audio files (music) is within reach of anyone with a job and a little talent. And that’s a good thing. The challenge will lie in separating the trickle of wheat from the deluge of chaff.

  7. Separating the wheat from the chaff is what the music business used to do.

    Every DJ was a talent scout.

    Clear Channel introduced efficiency and National play lists. Exit talent scouts. Enter dreck.

    The DJs had their ear to the market. The current music biz has its eye on the $$$$.

  8. “Clear Channel introduced efficiency and National play lists. Exit talent scouts. Enter dreck.

    The DJs had their ear to the market. The current music biz has its eye on the $$$$.”

    Oh please, this is just a variant of “When I was young, Giants strode the Earth. Now all there are pygmies.”

    And the DJ’s weren’t interested in $$$$$$$’s?? Please, don’t make me laugh. Play lists have been around for decades.

    Now they’re national… Let’s be honest 99% of all music is tripe. Look at the selected top 40 from the year you graduated from High School and the year previous to that and the year after graduation. Tell me if you are proud of that music? “pop” music is mostly trash.

    I’m going to want a fairly scientific discussion of what makes the music “then” less dreck than music today, beyond your simple claim.

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