Glorious Mosaic

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This sharp Cincinnati Enquirer editorial marks the 10th anniversary of the release of Mosaic, the first widely used Web browser that helped make the World Wide Web a mass phenomenon.

About 10,000 people started using Mosaic in April 1993. Today, more than 67 percent of U.S. adults use browsers, as opposed to 9 percent in 1995. More than 580 million people worldwide have online access, a figure that could reach 1 billion by 2005. In June 1993, there were about 130 Web sites. In February 2003, there were more than 38 million.

"The most satisfying thing was just seeing how we assembled a couple of building blocks that people could then pick up and do things we never anticipated," Marc Andreessen, who led Mosaic's creation (and later founded Netscape), told Newsweek.

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  1. Mosaic was my first browser. Ah, the memories. Only in the digital age can ten years seem like forever.

  2. Nostalgia’s great. I recently downloaded an Apple II emulator and some games I played non-stop during the 80s. I can’t believe I was so engrossed by games with squeky little sounds and 4 to 16 color graphics!

  3. In your DREAMS Hutch-In-Son! Suck it! The Internet is a libertarian’s (slowly eroding away anonymous tax-free 🙂 paradise and it just *happened* to be developed in concert by big government and public universities, HAHA /nelson 😀 I bet you think the same way about our great nation’s national highway system or PBS broadcasting /pumps fist 😀 Gothcha there, punk!

  4. Just because it is inefficient to make an omelet by breaking fifty eggs does not mean it is impossible.

    Anyway, the author wrote “dot.com”. That drives me nuts. At least “PIN number” hides its problems slightly.

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