North Carolina Cop Admits in Court to Lying About 911 Call to Enter Home, Police Chief Shocked—Shocked—This Would Happen in His Department

not a jokeDurhamAn unidentified police officer in Durham, North Carolina, reportedly testified in federal court that he lied to a resident, claiming there was a 911 call from the home when there hadn’t been, in order to enter the house, and claimed this was standard practice in his department. Durham’s police chief, Jose Lopez, is shocked this is happening in the department, and claims it’s the only time it’s ever happened. Via the local ABC affiliate:

"Effective immediately," Lopez wrote [in a memo obtained by ABC11], "No officer shall inform a citizen that there has been a call to the emergency communications center, including a hang up call, when there in fact has been no such call."

ABC11 spoke with Chief Lopez by phone while he attended an FBI Training Institute in Washington D.C. 

Lopez denied the officer's claims that lying to get consent to enter a home is a common practice. 

"This has never occurred," said Lopez. "We want to find out what...led him [the officer] to believe that this is something he should do."

The officer does not appear to have been placed on administrative leave or suspended, though the chief insists disciplinary action is possible if the claim is true, though he didn’t specify if there would be disciplinary action if the claim weren’t true and the cop was therefore have found to have lied under oath.

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  • MegaloMonocle||

    he didn’t specify if there would be disciplinary action if the claim weren’t true and the cop was therefore have found to have lied under oath.

    I'm pretty sure he doesn't want to start down that road.

  • UCrawford||

    Although if it is proven to be a case of perjury, that's one of the things that'll actually get a cop fired ("for real" fired). A police officer with a perjury conviction is useless on the stand for the state.

  • Rich||

    Is that why they don't go after Clapper?

  • UCrawford||

    Because he's not a cop.

    I should probably have caveated that with "...if you're Officer Nobody, regular police." :)

  • MegaloMonocle||

    Nobody's even talking about bringing a perjury charge against this cop.

    I suspect he'll get fired even though he told the truth. He committed the original sin: he ratted out he fellows on the force.

  • UCrawford||

    Probably so.

  • sarcasmic||

    Original sin is what we are all born with. In the case of Christianity it's sex, in the case of AGW it's carbon.

    What you're talking about is unforgivable sin. In the case of Christianity it's blasphemy, in the case of AGW it's driving an SUV (unless you're a priest or politician).

  • sarcasmic||

    And with cops it's being honest.

  • MegaloMonocle||

    Duly noted, sarc.

  • BigT||

    In the case of America the original sin is racism ...according to progs.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Lopez denied the officer's claims that lying to get consent to enter a home is a common practice.

    Adding, "I'm not under oath right now, right?"

  • Obama's Buttplug||

    An unidentified police officer in Durham, North Carolina, reportedly testified in federal court

    If he testified in federal court, why is there no record of his name?

  • Trouser-Pod||

    Oh, you! With your logic and shit...

  • perlhaqr||

    "Your winnings, sir."

  • ||

    Effective immediately...No officer shall inform a citizen that there has been a call to the emergency communications center, including a hang up call, when there in fact has been no such call.

    So the old policy was...what?

  • UnCivilServant||

    The old policy was:

    Effective 1971, No officer shall inform a citizen that there has been a call to the emergency communications center, including a hang up call, when there in fact has been no such call.
  • ||

    Lopez denied the officer's claims that lying to get consent to enter a home is a common practice.

    In all fairness, lying to get into the house is still a step up from the 2 a.m. no-knock dynamic entry.

  • Free Society||

    We can't start punishing cops for manufacturing probable cause. Why then, our whole system of injustice based on that manufacture will unravel.

  • James Anderson Merritt||

    This is North Carolina, right? How do they do things in Mt. Airy? WWAD (What Would Andy Do)?

    "What is was, was perjury."

  • FYTW||

    I'm kind of surprised that anybody's shocked by this. I mean, cops have long been able to shamelessly lie to procure a confession from a suspect -- so why wouldn't they assume they can shamelessly lie to procure consent to enter someone's home?

  • On The Random, Mandelbrot||

    Makes me wonder what lies they told to get the job in the first place... Not that I really want to know.

  • brokencycle||

    Why would he be in trouble for perjury? He didn't lie on the stand - he lied to the owner.

    Don't trust cops. Don't let them into your house without a warrant.

  • UCrawford||

    If he lied about it being department policy (which is what he testified to), then he lied under oath and that would be perjury.

  • Almanian!||

    Don't trust cops. Don't let them into your house without a warrant.

    fify

  • Almanian!||

    Yeah, timely. On jury duty today. Ultimately not selected (a minor miracle - it took till 4:00 to empanel the jury, and they went through 30+ people...never called my number). Watching all this:

    1) The judge, prosecutor and defense attorney all impressed me. Really.

    2) SOME of my colleagues in the jury pool made me have hope for humanity, and rated my respect.

    3) MOST of my colleagues in the jury pool reminded me that I basically hate people, and why.

    Especially the woman married to a cop, who said, "Well, yeah, if a police officer makes a statement, I'm going to trust it. Every one I know [EVERY. ONE.] has really high integrity." "So you're saying you'd trust the word of a police officer over a non-police officer?" "Well, YEAH!!" "Any disagreement with dismissing Ms. Smith for cause? No? Thank you, Ms. Smith."

    Well, she does actually suck cop cock, so....

  • sarcasmic||

    Well, she does actually suck cop cock, so....

    You said she married a cop. If they were dating then that might be true, but married women generally don't suck dick. At least not their husband's dick.

  • Almanian!||

    YMMV

  • sarcasmic||

    Twice since saying "I do." Twice. My job still sucks. Why can't my wife?

  • Almanian!||

    Been married to the same woman for 29 years. I'm just sayin'....my mileage varied from yours.

    Sorry. For you :(

  • Almanian!||

    AND NOTHING ELSE HAPPENED

    /obligatory

  • Stormy Dragon||

    "Effective immediately," Lopez wrote [in a memo obtained by ABC11], "No officer shall inform a citizen that there has been a call to the emergency communications center, including a hang up call, when there in fact has been no such call."

    I read this as "Effective immediately, officers shall always make a hangup call to the emergency communications before telling a citizen that there has been such a call."

  • sarcasmic||

    I read this as "Effective immediately, use a different lie if you want to illegally gain consent to enter a residence."

  • Almanian!||

    Shorter Lopez: Do what u gotta do, yo

  • MegaloMonocle||

    Me, too, sarc.

    Funny that he couldn't make a broader statement, like, "No officer shall tell a lie, by commission or omission, in order to gain access without a warrant to a dwelling, place of business, or automobile."

    Or even: "Tell a lie on the job, get fired. Unless you have a specific written waiver for undercover work."

  • Dread Pirate Roberts||

    I suppose the cop is 16 years old as well, since the media is not releasing his name.

  • sarcasmic||

    Cops lie. It's what they do. They lie about practically everything, because force and fraud is their job description. They lie to get confessions, they lie about the law, they lie to get people to open doors, they lie on police reports, they lie in court, they lie about fucking everything. As a general rule, if their lips are moving, they're lying.

  • Almanian!||

    Nuh uh! That women on the jury (till they booted her) told me that cops all have "high integrity", and are to be trusted more than "non-police officers" (she did not say "civilians", FWIW).

    So - you're a liar!

  • MegaloMonocle||

    I'm surprised that she said "non-police officers".

    "Untermensch" would have been more accurate, and it brings in the German that really puts that sparkle in a fascist's eye.

  • Almanian!||

    ERMAHGERD! KERPS R LERRING!

  • RishJoMo||

    I dont think Rip Van Winkle is going to liek that.

    www.AnonToolz.tk

  • ||

    "Durham’s police chief, Jose Lopez, is shocked this is happening in the department, and claims it’s the only time it’s ever happened"

    That an officer has done it or been caught?

  • RishJoMo||

    Sounds like your average cop and department to me lol.

    www.AnonToolz.tk

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