David Brooks Vying for Ellsworth Toohey's Column Space in the Banner With a Passover Song of Praise for Compulsion

As a fan of Ayn Rand who occasionally likes to defend her against the charges that her villains—the figures in culture, business, and government who in her novels embody what she considers hateful ideas—are absurd caricatures with no connection to lived reality, I invite you to read today's David Brooks column. I know it's a hard thing to ask, but do it for Ms. Rand, I implore you.

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Brooks, one of the most prominent columnists in the newspaper that supposedly defines our media culture, the New York Times, riffs like a Linus with a guillotine on the "true meaning of Passover." Outdoing Ayn Rand's villainous Fountainhead columnist Ellsworth Toohey in his mission to redefine the human spirit as one best expressed in servitude.

He's not just offering the usual "we need big government" argument of pointing out all the actual miseries and troubles it supposedly is uniquely able to solve. Brooks is arguing on a deeper level: we need big government because we need authority to tell us what to do; it is positively good for us on a metaphysical level, never mind its practical effects.

Like Loki, clearly the guy who Brooks mistook for the hero in the Avengers movie, Brooks tells us we were born to be ruled.

Excerpts: 

Monday night was the start of Passover, the period when Jews celebrate the liberation of the Israelites from slavery into freedom.

Sure, escaping from slavery to freedom is cool—I guess!—but isn't there another side to this story, Israelites?

But that’s not all the Exodus story is, or not even mainly what it is. When John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin wanted to put Moses as a central figure on the Great Seal of the United States, they were not celebrating him as a liberator, but as a re-binder. It wasn’t just that he led the Israelites out of one set of unjust laws. It was that he re-bound them with another set of laws. Liberating to freedom is the easy part. Re-binding with just order and accepted compulsion is the hard part....

Brooks then gives lip service to the notion that, sure, the story of Moses also shows that leaders need to be bound by rules as well, being sometimes imperfect and impetuous. (The even larger meaning one can glean from the whole "contract with God" story is that God himself needs to be, or wants to be, bound by rules and agreements freely entered into.)

But back to Brooks' more vital point: you need someone to tell you what to do, at all times!

Just as leaders need binding, so do regular people. The Israelites in Exodus whine; they groan; they rebel for petty reasons. When they are lost in a moral wilderness, they immediately construct an idol to worship and give meaning to their lives.

But Exodus is a reminder that statecraft is soulcraft, that good laws can nurture better people. Even Jews have different takes on how exactly one must observe the 613 commandments, but the general vision is that the laws serve many practical and spiritual purposes. For example, they provide a comforting structure for daily life. If you are nervous about the transitions in your life, the moments when you go through a door post, literally or metaphorically, the laws will give you something to do in those moments and ease you on your way.

Oh, for a world—one being built more solidly by bureaucracy every day—in which you can't even walk through a door without a set of rules to control you, er, "ease you on your way."

And if you choose not to be thusly eased, someone with a gun will come by to ask you why. Maybe in the middle of the night and bashing in your door. After shouting a warning, of course. We are a nation of laws!

The laws tame the ego and create habits of deference by reminding you of your subordination to something permanent....The laws moderate the pleasures; they create guardrails that are meant to restrain people from going off to emotional or sensual extremes.

The 20th-century philosopher Eliyahu Dessler wrote, “the ultimate aim of all our service is to graduate from freedom to compulsion.” 

Bam! Let us not forget the wisdom of America's great Judeo-Christian tradition: freedom is for the unformed, compulsion is for the Real Adults, the kind of real adults who tell us what to think from their perch at the world's mightiest newspaper.

Last month Jesse Walker noted Brooks' upset tummy over our lack of respect and obeisance to Great Leaders.

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  • Loki||

    I invite you to read today's David Brooks column.

    No thanks, I don't really want to throw up right now. If I need to induce vomiting later I'll check it out.

  • Tonio||

    ^This. A Brooks column is as effective as syrup of ipecac.

  • Jordan||

    It wasn’t just that he led the Israelites out of one set of unjust laws.

    How dare Moses impose freedom on the Israelites like that! He was the real slaver there!

    /Tonyderp

  • ||

    just order and accepted compulsion

    Our order is not just and I don't accept your compulsion. Suck on that, Brooksie.

  • GILMORE||

    "Oh, I real plenty of conservative writers.... David Brooks....Michael Gerson... Bill Kristol.... you know, the *serious* ones, not like those TeaHadist Kooks on the far right from the Cato Institute!"

    /[NYT-Reading 'Intellectual']

  • GILMORE||

    "real"=read

  • GILMORE||

    "SEE! I TOLD YOU~!!! GILMORE IS A COVERT-NEOCON!!"
    /Bo Cara Esq

  • Lord Humungus||

    The Witchfinder General sayeth. And so it was. Amen.

  • kinnath||

    good laws can nurture better people.

    The right people; pure people; Aryan people. That's what he's talking about, right?

  • WTF||

    Ein Volk, ein Reich, ein Führer.

  • sasob||

    Nah - just the kind of people who act and think the way he thinks they should.

  • Pro Libertate||

    Cooperation works for many; compulsion works for a few.

  • Sevo||

    Proving intelligence is not required to string words together and get paid for it.

  • Michael Price||

    It requires intelligence to get paid for stringing words together. The problem with Brooks is evil, not stupidity.

  • SugarFree||

    Man is meant to be ruled. Man is meant to be broken to the saddle and the yoke. Without rules imposed by someone or something more powerful man would rape and murder and steal. Man cannot govern himself.

    This argument from Brooks sounds awfully familiar.

  • Loki||

    This argument from Brooks sounds awfully familiar.

    It's the same argument used by pretty much every tyrant ever. Some dress it up in prettier words, but it's the same argument every time.

  • sasob||

    Man is meant to be ruled. Man is meant to be broken to the saddle and the yoke. Without rules imposed by someone or something more powerful man would rape and murder and steal.

    Even worse - he might even decide to keep the fruits of his own life and labor and employ them as he, himself, sees fit.

  • IceTrey||

    Man IS meant to be ruled, but there's only supposed to be three rules:

    Rule 1
    No person may initiate force, threats of force, or fraud against any other person's self or property.

    Rule 2
    Force may be used in defense against those who violate Rule 1.

    Rule 3
    No exceptions shall exist for Rules 1 and 2.

  • JuiceHog||

    "The laws tame the ego and create habits of deference by reminding you of your subordination to something permanent. The laws spiritualize matter, so that something very normal, like having a meal, has a sacred component to it."

    His need to be ruled is do deep it's religious. This isn't a joke: he really does worship the state. These are the words of a man desperately searching for a boot to lick.

  • Rhywun||

    His need to be ruled is do deep it's religious.

    Yup, I was thinking the whole time about the way many religions largely boil down to "submit!"

  • ||

    "These are the words of a man desperately searching for a boot to lick."

    Bingo.

  • JWW||

    Great, thanks for the link. I'm never going to be able to unread that garbage.

  • sarcasmic||

    Freedom means asking permission and obeying orders. Liberty is tyranny. Blah, blah, blah...

  • Dances-with-Trolls||

    Holy shit, that's a new low even for this dickbag.

    Fuck off, slaver.

  • PRX||

    It must be nice to have a completely unlicensed, unregulated job like Brooks and be completely oblivious to any regulatory burden.

  • sloopyinca||

    Oh, he'll be just fine when his industry is regulated. It'll make it easier for "credentialed" journalists like him to keep their sources and create a permanent class of writer while disparaging those working outside the mainstream.

    Fuck this asshole. He's a rent-seeking bootlicker that deserves t be thrown on the ash heap of history. I'd be fine if it were done while he's still breathing,mas long as that ash heap is still smoldering.

  • Francisco d'Anconia||

    I think his sin is simply cowardice.

    People giving responsibility to the state so they never have to take any for themselves.

  • Pro Libertate||

    Excellent. Keep showing your hand like this, Brooks. At some point, people are going to get what you keep saying to them.

  • ||


    PE Seattle 4 hours ago
    "The laws tame the ego and create habits of deference by reminding you of your subordination to something permanent. The laws spiritualize matter, so that something very normal, like having a meal, has a sacred component to it. The laws build community by anchoring belief in common practices. The laws moderate religious zeal; faith is not expressed in fiery acts but in everyday habits. The laws moderate the pleasures; they create guardrails that are meant to restrain people from going off to emotional or sensual extremes."

    Elegantly described, thank you Mr. Brooks. In our hectic, you tube, twitter, text-riddled, mile-a-minute world these laws provide a foundation to navigate through the muck. A secure, beautiful way to grow up.

    Flag21Recommend Share this comment on FacebookShare this comment on Twitter

    Ugh.

  • WTF||

    A secure, beautiful way to grow up.

    Well, prisons are pretty secure, so he's got that part right.

  • Pro Libertate||

    The way the left talks about democracy and the little guy, you'd think their first refuge would be a cooperative culture, more like the libertarian view of the civil society.

    Instead, it's all about unlimited power over others and forcing compliance with whatever the government chooses to care about today.

  • sarcasmic||

    “Political tags—such as royalist, communist, democrat, populist, fascist, liberal conservative, and so forth—are never basic criteria. The human race divides politically into those who want people to be controlled and those who have no such desire. The former are idealists acting from highest motives for the greatest good of the greatest number. The latter are surly curmudgeons, suspicious and lacking in altruism. But they are more comfortable neighbors than the other sort.”
    -Heinlein

  • Sevo||

    ..."The laws tame the ego and create habits of deference by reminding you of your subordination to something permanent."...

    I doubt this person gave it enough thought to realize s/he provided the justification for slavery.

  • Loki||

    *facepalm*

    Jesus fucking Christ... I don't even... Did this guy type this while wearing a gimp suit in some dominatrix' torture dungeon?

    To paraphrase a line from Braveheart: "If that's an American, I'm ashamed to call myself one." I'm starting to suspect that there were a lot of people, including this assclown, nodding along to Loki's speech in The Avengers about how people are "made to be ruled." Fucking disgusting.

  • tarran||

    "Accepted Compulsion"?!?!?

    How the fuck does any person with any capacity for reason write those words without realizing he is fucking up?

    It's like saying "loving rape" or "accidentally intended"

  • sarcasmic||

    Not giving is taking. Not taking is giving.

  • Pro Libertate||

    I don't need fucking compulsion to behave, thank you very much.

  • ||

    I think you are striking at the heart of it here.

    People who do need compulsion in order to behave cannot conceive of those who don't.

  • sarcasmic||

    Some people have no moral sense other than what the government tells them. That's why there's no convincing them that government sanctioned theft is wrong. You just can't do it. They simply cannot comprehend the idea of government doing something wrong.

  • eyeroller||

    It's sort of like when the IRS thanks you for your voluntary compliance.

  • sasob||

    Or when some dipshit thanks a bunch of draftees for their military service.

  • ||

    WAR IS PEACE
    FREEDOM IS SLAVERY
    IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH

  • sasob||

    WEALTH IS POVERTY

    LESS IS MORE

    PROPERTY IS THEFT

  • Bill Dalasio||

    Can't we all just hire Brooks a dominatrix and dispense with all this shit?

  • Loki||

    If anyone can confirm his address I'll see if I can anonymously send him a gimp suit and a ball gag for his birthday.

    Unfortunately, with the modern surveillance state I doubt very seriously that it couldn't be traced back to me. The days of paying cash to ship something from the the UPS store with a fake return address and never being found out are over.

  • Francisco d'Anconia||

    Why would such a delivery need be anonymous? Fuck him. I think he's a shitbag coward and I don't care who knows it.

  • Loki||

    Brooks would probably file charges of harrassment or something. If he could he would probably show up at the SWAT raid and, watching from a safe distance, pleasure himself while rubbing his nipples as my dog gets shot and I get dragged out of my house in handcuffs and thrown in a cage. All because that asshole can't take a joke.

  • PRX||

    it's worse than Brooks thinks. some of us don't even have a leader.

  • Fluffy||

    This column is very, very similar in spirit to the "Snowden is evil because he is not mediated by a greater institution," column.

    Brooks saw Snowden as evil because he was not loyal to any institution. To Brooks, if Snowden had different life experiences, he would understand how important loyalty to institutions is.

    What Brooks failed to realize is that if our institutions were just, there would be no need to cultivate in any man a loyalty to an institution for that institution's sake. Each man would merely need to love justice, and loyalty to the institution would naturally follow.

    Similarly, when laws are just, there is no need for compulsion of the man who loves justice. You only need compulsion for the outlaw.

    Loyalty and compulsion are only important values if your intentions are evil. That's another thing Rand understood that Brooks does not.

  • ||

    It's like he was plucked straight off the pages of AS and dropped into the real world.

    I mean, that's got to be what happened because no one can be that stupid and live through childhood. Right?

  • Francisco d'Anconia||

    I mean, that's got to be what happened because no one can be that stupid and live through childhood. Right?

    If only. Wouldn't it be nice if it worked that way?

  • sasob||

    The laws tame the ego and create habits of deference by reminding you of your subordination to something permanent....

    There is nothing permanent in this existence - except the desire of some to rule over others.

  • Loki||

    What do you think he was referring to with his whole "subordination to something permanent" line? Shorter Brooks: "Submit, prole!"

  • sasob||

    Ya, pretty much.

  • Lord Humungus||

    And for those who don't accept the compulsion? At first it will be "nudges". And then the whip. And then death.

  • Cliché Bandit||

    A project:
    Take ACTUAL published speeches and articles from the last 2-3 years of people in our gubmint and paste them into Fountainhead/Atlas. I imagine, just like this article, that you could populate the entire book/s. Except with regards to Rearden and Roark.

  • Paul.||

    If you did that, no one would take the books seriously.

  • sasob||

    Many years ago when Ayn Rand and her bunch published a newsletter (The Objectivist,) it contained a column in which readers were invited to send in examples, drawn from everyday publications and newsmedia, of remarks made by various public figures that closely emulated or paralleled many found in her novels. The idea was to show that the villains in her books were not the exaggerations the critics all claimed they were. I believe it was called From the Horror File, or something similar to that.

  • From the Tundra||

    OT, but another moron stringing words together:

    Rand Paul For President (not really)

    http://online.wsj.com/news/art.....commentary

  • Brett L||

    I, for one, look forward to another GOP disaster in which an "electable" politician with the resume of a moderate Democrat gets savaged by a suddenly unsupportive media and abandoned by the base. This is yet another example of why I left the GOP. By 2016, this guy will be inviting Charlie Crist back to the GOP so he can run against Hillary.

  • MJGreen||

    Someone so nakedly unacceptable to the overwhelming majority of sane Americans that only the GOP could think of nominating him.

    Because he... thinks Cheney had ulterior motives in pushing for war in Iraq. That's apparently Paul's only major sin.

    Good thing, I guess, that most voters are not sane Americans.

  • sloopyinca||

    Who is more evil: the NYT opinion writer or the asshole that links to the NYT opinion writer?

    FFS, Doherty, are you some kind of sadist? Subjecting us to this idiocy is going to set back the collective libertarian IQ by at least a point or two. OTOH, the number of shattered computer monitors after reading it may actually spur the economy.

  • Raven Nation||

    Broken monitor fallacy.

  • Fluffy||

    If anything Rand dramatically underestimated exactly how debased human beings could become.

    No Rand villain ever spoke the word "triggering".

  • sloopyinca||

    good laws can nurture better people.

    I'd reverse this and say that good people can nurture better laws...which is why we haven't seen any good, government-restricting laws passed in nearly a century.

  • Fluffy||

    It also makes sense that he would use the Mosaic law as his example, precisely because of the broad areas in which it is arbitrary and unjust. Notice the stress on the 613 commandments, and not the 10.

    He has to put the stress there - because if you consider the 10 commandments (or at least #3 to #10) many people could easily keep these commandments without compulsion. But things you do by inclination don't bring on enough of that good old ego subordination for Brooks - so he HAS TO go to the 613.

  • sarcasmic||

    "I leave you with my revised list of the Two Commandments. Thou shalt always be honest and faithful to the provider of thy nookie, and thou shalt try real hard not to kill anyone. Unless, of course, they pray to a different invisible man from the one you pray to."
    -George Carlin

  • Paul.||

    The ten amendments leave too many holes in government power, but the 613 amendments, now we got a federal government that can finally get stuff done.

  • sarcasmic||

    Liberty and justice for none.

  • PRX||

    Won't anyone think of all the people big government has saved over the last 100 years?

  • Raven Nation||

    In every healthy State the letter of the written constitution is of small importance compared with the practice of the living constitution... The leader's responsibility is always to a minority that possesses the instincts of statesmanship and represents the rest of the nation in the struggle of history.

    AND

    The true class-State is an expression of the general historical experience that is always a single social stratum which, constitutionally or otherwise, provides the political leading. It is always a definite minority that represents the world- historical tendency of a State...

    Spengler, Decline of the West

  • Stormy Dragon||

    Now every time I see David Brooks, I'm going to imagine him wearing that ridiculous Loki helmet.

  • Scruffy Nerfherder||

    He wouldn't wear the helmet. He would be sucking on Loki's balls.

  • Brett L||

    Does sitting on it count as wearing?

  • BakedPenguin||

    ...and nothing else.

  • Loki||

    *barf*

  • Michael Price||

    Oh OK, I'm OK now, no I'm no *barf*.

  • Paul.||

    Just as leaders need binding, so do regular people.

    The subtext here, of course, is mr. brooks ain't regular people.

    In fact, I just threw up a little in my mouth. Regular people...

  • Paul.||

    But Exodus is a reminder that statecraft is soulcraft,

    And yet, no mention of starcraft. What kind of odious villain....

  • Paul.||

    The 20th-century philosopher Eliyahu Dessler wrote, “the ultimate aim of all our service is to graduate from freedom to compulsion.”

    Holy shit... someone actually wrote this... and it wasn't a joke?

  • Raston Bot||

    I don't know anything about that philosopher but I've read Brooks before. I'm going to give the philosopher the benefit of the doubt and suggest that Brooks is taking him waaaaaaaaaaaay out of context.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    The needs of the few outweigh the freedom of the many.

  • sloopyinca||

    Reading the NYT opinion pages is like changing diapers. Every time you look, there's another pile of shit there and in ever-increasing quantity. Of course, after a while babies become potty-trained. If only the same could be said for the NYT Editorial Board.

  • Brett L||

    What if we just whacked them on the nose with a rolled up NYT every time we noticed the shitpile?

  • sloopyinca||

    Ok, I just tried that and Baby Reason started crying and gave me a "you will pay for that one day, father" looks.

    Just kidding. I would never strike a child until they're old enough to know why.

  • Brett L||

    See, this is why I come here. I now know that hitting a baby with a rolled up newspaper won't get them potty-trained any faster.

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    By all means let us show loyalty to the laws, including the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. We could even impose an oath or affirmation on officeholders requiring them to obey the Constitution, and then hold them accountable if they violate their promise.

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    The point of the Judeo-Christian civilization is that rulers and ruled have mutual responsibilities. And the higher up someone is, the more the responsibility.

  • Notorious G.K.C.||

    And, of course, the ultimate authority resides in God, not some Brooksian National Greatness state.

  • Paul.||

    Unfortunately, people have become confused with the nuanced meanings of 'responsibility'. In the modern era, more responsibility just means more shit to do, and more shit they CAN do.

    When it should be seen as "the more shit you can be hanged by the neck until dead for".

    Things went wrong, you're responsible.

  • BigT||

    Brooks should have been a big fan of the USSR, where your career was chosen for you by the state.

    "Brooks, you are a dog-walker's assistant."

  • Paul.||

    It's actually one of my favorite go-to arguments. Whenever some media pundit sniffs about the inherent superiority of socialism/communism, I always say, "Great, here's your assigned factory job, we expect to see you at seven in the AM in your speed suit."

  • sasob||

    Yes, he'd make a great poop scooper - shambling along with his little shovel and plastic baggy full of shit, wearing the Loki helmet and nothing else. :-)

  • Spartacus||

    If Brooks read anything more recently written than Exodus, he might come across something like this:

    ...that to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it...

  • Francisco d'Anconia||

    But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.

  • Lord Humungus||

    I'll just throw out some Zapata quotes:

    I want to die a slave to principles. Not to men.

    I rather die on my feet than live upon my knees.

  • sloopyinca||

    Brooks is a big government lover. I'd be curious to know if anyone has ever calculated the lives ended vs the lives saved by big government and an equal comparison to lives ended vs saved by small government. I know it would be subjective, but a good bit of it could be taken seriously.

  • ||

    Something that is glaringly obvious when you travel; the more backwards and primitive a culture is, the more it is ruled by tradition and superstition, the less rational thought there is.

    For the savage every detail of daily life is ruled by habit. Whatever decisions he makes are governed only by passion. He does not ever need to think things out, to be rational. Rational thought is the difference between the civilized and the savage.

    "one must observe the 613 commandments, but the general vision is that the laws serve many practical and spiritual purposes. For example, they provide a comforting structure for daily life. If you are nervous about the transitions in your life, the moments when you go through a door post, literally or metaphorically, the laws will give you something to do in those moments and ease you on your way."

    Hey Dave, go fuck yourself you simpleton.

  • Acosmist||

    China is the most tradition- and superstition-ruled culture there is. Primitive?

  • Terc||

    "The fact is that the average man's love of liberty is nine-tenths imaginary, exactly like his love of sense, justice and truth. He is not actually happy when free; he is uncomfortable, a bit alarmed, and intolerably lonely. Liberty is not a thing for the great masses of men. It is the exclusive possession of a small and disreputable minority, like knowledge, courage and honor. It takes a special sort of man to understand and enjoy liberty — and he is usually an outlaw in democratic societies."

    HL Mencken

  • trshmnster the terrible||

    Last I checked, in Exodus Moses was in direct contact with God, and received the Ten Commandments directly from Him. Not only that, but any person in the Israelite encampment was welcome to leave at any time and wander through the desert on his own.

    Furthermore, once they did settle down a few chapters later, Judah and Israel DID split apart because the Israelite king was shitty and getting his ass kicked in both foreign and domestic policy.

    Beyond even that, there was this dude Jesus, which according to the same exact Bible was God Himself. Jesus came down and tore apart the Jewish leadership for being disastrous and for enslaving the common man to trivial rules and regulations. He tore them apart to the point that they strung him up on a tree and bled him out.

    Brooks needs to review his Bible and/or Torah before gleaning "government is God" from it.

  • jabster||

    See my Scriptural quote below.

  • Lord Peter Wimsey||

    I have to laugh when I read that Rand's villains are not believable. Are they over the top? Yes. They are also spot on. Ellsworth Toohey-like journalists are usually are quick to accuse Rand of cardboard villains.

    You don't think Harry Reid is in Atlas Shrugged? He's there.

  • BiMonSciFiCon||

    Last night on The Independents, Kmele said he met Thomas Friedman in an airport once and said he was a very nice and gracious guy. Stories like that always make me reconsider my thoughts about people.

    I don't think there's a story that could make me think Brooks was a decent guy.

  • GILMORE||

    Hitler could have been the life of the fucking party for all I know.

    So a guy "isn't a screaming asshole 24/7". Does that do anything to excuse the drivel they publish weekly?

    I've met some "nice guys" who believed horrible, horrible things. In fact, the more horrible the beliefs, I find they tend to compensate with by being 'congenial' = how else would anyone tolerate them?

    By contrast = people I've known who were brilliant observers of the status quo and very-talented writers? (say, Hitchens?): can often very well be Total Dicks.

    I've met a few of my 'heroes'*: a good proportion have been serious jerks. I wouldn't be surprised if people I despised turned out to be decent people to have a beer with.

  • jabster||

    You want some Scripture? Try this on for size:
    I Samuel 8 (NIV)
    10 Samuel told all the words of the Lord to the people who were asking him for a king. 11 He said, “This is what the king who will reign over you will claim as his rights: He will take your sons and make them serve with his chariots and horses, and they will run in front of his chariots. 12 Some he will assign to be commanders of thousands and commanders of fifties, and others to plow his ground and reap his harvest, and still others to make weapons of war and equipment for his chariots. 13 He will take your daughters to be perfumers and cooks and bakers. 14 He will take the best of your fields and vineyards and olive groves and give them to his attendants. 15 He will take a tenth of your grain and of your vintage and give it to his officials and attendants. 16 Your male and female servants and the best of your cattle[c] and donkeys he will take for his own use. 17 He will take a tenth of your flocks, and you yourselves will become his slaves. 18 When that day comes, you will cry out for relief from the king you have chosen, but the Lord will not answer you in that day.”

    Of course, these were the same Israelites who were forever bitching to be back in Egypt as slaves.

  • sasob||

    Only a tenth? Hm. Imagine that.

  • Duelles||

    Brooks, like David Cole in this months Atlanic who defends Cass Sunsteine's 'soft government'. The real end result is that the left is confused. They demand equality. They demand diversity. To whom am I diversely equal ? And why is it so important to create a government that eliminates that which makes us human. Oh the humanity !!!!

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