Alabama Cop Shoots, Kills Dog After Entering Backyard While Chasing Man Who Ran Off

shot by copWKRGA police officer in Mobile, Alabama, shot two dogs, killing one and injuring the other, after entering a closed backyard while pursuing a “suspect” police would only identify as someone who ran off while being questioned by police.

Via the local CBS affiliate:

"He had his arms up, both hands on the pistol, backing up and then he just pointed the gun down and shot twice," says Yeager.

Alfred was shot and killed in the back yard. A second dog, Bobidae, was shot in the ear.

"Common sense will tell you to knock on the door of the residence and let them know that there was some people running around that could be dangerous. If they had done that then at that point in time I would have told them never to come into my backyard or I could've got the dogs inside where they belong in their kennels, and everything would have been fine," he says.

The Mobile Police Department, of course, disagree with Yeager, telling WKRG they won’t stop to ask permission if they’re in pursuit of a suspect. When it comes to car chases, some jurisdictions place restrictions on car chases due to the risk of serious injury often present in such pursuits. In fact, a question of qualified immunity for cops when such chases turn deadly is being heard by the Supreme Court this year.  The incidence of police shootings of dogs, not to mention humans, in the course of other police work, like foot chases, drug and no-knock raids, and even serving probation warrants, suggests more general restrictions on police action to limit the risk of injury and death would also be prudent. It’s time to apply the fireman’s rule to police officers.

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  • Ted S.||

    If the dogs are vicious enough to go after the police, they're vicious enough that they'll go after the escapee too.

    What's that Peelian prinicple about the people and pets being the police and the police being the pets?

  • Riven||

    "To maintain at all times a relationship with the public that gives reality to the historic tradition that the police are the public and that the public are the police, the police being only members of the public who are paid to give full-time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interests of community welfare and existence." ?

  • Ted S.||

    When the cops shot the dog, they were probably yelling STOP RESISTING!!!111!!! too.

    The dog they only shot in the ear, they ticketed for failure to obey a lawful order.

  • ||

    Basically it comes down to: if a cop decides to chase someone, they 1) can completely trespass on private property without a warrant while doing so, 2) can destroy property including animals while doing so with impunity, and 3)...I guess my question for 3 is, what happens if the property owner gets in the way?

  • Riven||

    "Obstruction of justice," I'd guess.

  • Bryan C||

    Cool. So a cop can go anywhere they want by inventing a "chase" of a "suspect" that no one else ever saw. Good thing cops never lie, or that whole Fourth Amendment thing would be in big trouble.

  • ||

    That's pretty much what I was getting at. "Oh, I was chasing someone, and I saw all these pot plants. I lost the 'suspect' but I was at least able to arrest the property owner for pot cultivation!"

    It's amazing how cops don't have to have actual proof of just about anything most of the time.

  • Root Boy||

    Could the homeowner shot the cop who is on his property and shooting at his animals?

    Seems like it would fall under that case in TX where the guy shot the no knock cops, or at least you'd hope it would.

    Anybody know what Mobile is like in terms of pro/anti cop?

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Cops piss themselves at the sight of dogs more than any profession. Mailmen somehow deal.

  • R C Dean||

    Running away from a cop does not establish probable cause for arrest, all by itself. So, the first question should be, did this cop have any legal authority to enter that back yard at all?

    I would assume they didn't have probably cause to arrest the interviewee before he ran, or they would have, you know, arrested him. So, my working assumption is, no probably cause to arrest, so no hot pursuit, etc. If he didn't have probable cause to arrest, I don't think he did have any right to trespass.

    And if he didn't, well, the rest of their defense all comes tumbling down.

  • GILMORE||

    You know, I think these stories are completely and utterly unfair. Will "Reason" at least do the thinking-public a favor and ALSO link to the statistics showing the HUNDREDS OF OFFICERS killed each year by house pets while simply attempting to do their duty? The magazine seems to suggest that these situations are *otherwise avoidable*, or that police officers are *instructed and trained to shoot dogs* as a default behavior, one they resort to nearly all the time, mainly because they "must get a kick out of discharging their firearm" or some crazy notion like that. I for one am sick of this slander and insist that this publication reveal this data in order to let the public be fully informed of the realities of the situation, rather than simply paint a picture out of any number of random 'isolated incidents'.

    /"An argument someone might make if in fact the data didn't show that a)Dogs don't kill cops, and b) cops shoot dogs because they're told its OK and there will be no penalties for doing so at random."

  • ||

    c) cops shoot dogs because they are bloodthirsty scum who want to at least shoot something if they can't find a human to shoot and get away with it.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    If a cop is waddling down the sidewalk toward you and suffers a massive heart attack and dies, will you be charged with first degree murder of a police officer?

    *As if I did not already know.

  • R C Dean||

    Interesting question, Late P. Would it matter if I pissed on him while he lay on the sidewalk?

  • LarryA||

    Not in Texas.

    Here intentionally murdering someone is a First Degree Felony, imprisonment for 5 to 99 years or life and/or a $10,000 fine.

    Murder of a LEO is a Capital Felony, life in prison or the death penalty.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    You know, I think these stories are completely and utterly unfair.

    Hey, Rollo!

  • ||

    Is "Cop Shoots Dog" the new "Dog Bites Man"?

    Alfred was shot and killed in the back yard. A second dog, Bobidae, was shot in the ear.

    Either I don't understand canine anatomy, or I don't understand household landscaping.

  • sarcasmic||

    The sad fact is that the job of the police is to force people to comply. As in obey.
    They are trained to treat anyone who doesn't immediately comply as a potentially deadly threat.
    This guy ran off. He didn't obey. He was not in compliance. He was a threat.
    Therefore it is the duty of the cop to chase him down and do anything necessary to force compliance.
    The dogs too, they didn't comply. So the cop did his job shot them.
    And nothing else will happen, because he was only did what he was trained to do.
    That's just the way it is.

    And there's nothing anyone can do about it because they have organized violence on their side. The only way to do anything about it is to organize, and that's war.

    So nothing can be done about it short of revolution, and all that does is exchange the devil you know for the devil you don't know.

  • C. S. P. Schofield||

    It is high time we the people changed the rules so as to remind our servants that we are the sovereign. And that pissing off the King is a high risk proposition.

    Seriously, the immunity of cops, prosecutors, and similar Christians to any expectation of common decency has to be reviewed.

  • Vampire||

    Right the hell on. Couldn't have summed the cops up better. As to a revolution, I doubt there will be a government after the next revolution. Maybe folks will have finally learned to free themselves from a master, and be truly free....instead of making believe they are, while being a slave to politicians. The biggest mistake of the founders was to continue a government, believing that a piece of paper would prevent folks from taking away liberty.

  • Lyle||

    What cop thinks it is okay to just shoot a dog in a yard your chasing a guy through? Aren't they not taught to leave peoples' property alone?

  • Redmanfms||

    Will "Reason" at least do the thinking-public a favor and ALSO link to the statistics showing the HUNDREDS OF OFFICERS killed each year by house pets while simply attempting to do their duty?

    Are there even "HUNDREDS OF OFFICERS" killed each year of all causes while attempting to do their duty?

    Hmmm, even for 2011 which was supposed to be the bloodiest year in 20 years for law enforcement, nope.

  • Seamus_Cameron||

    What if a Police Dog had entered the yard, menaced the occupant and then been shot by said occupant?

  • silverfang789||

    I think we need to get rid of qualified immunity so the homeowner can sue the cop personally in civil court instead of suing the city, which simply comes out of taxpayer dollars and does nothing to address the wrong behavior on the part of the cop.

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