Chicago Hasn’t Seen Crime This Bad Since the Last Time The Feds Banned Something

Reward poster for El ChapoSource: USOpenBorders.comNot since 1930 has Chicago declared anyone “Public Enemy No. 1,” but the Chicago Crime Commission assures us that Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman deserves the title every bit as much as the infamous Al Capone once did—even though he lives more than 2,000 miles away.

Like Capone, Guzman runs a crime syndicate that earns the majority of its vast revenues from the sale of illegal substances. Capone ran The Chicago Outfit, which (by some reports) earned more than $100 million per year from 1925 to 1930. That would be more than $1.3 billion per year in today’s dollars, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics inflation calculator.

Guzman is head of the Sinaloa Cartel, a brutal drug-trafficking operation headquartered in Western Mexico that rakes in about $3 billion each year. The influence of the cartel is so toxic that it is blamed for rising homicide rates in Chicago—and it could easily be blamed for significant violence elsewhere. The Sinaloa Cartel operates in 17 states in Mexico and in cities across North America, especially along the border.

It is impossible to know how many people have died at the hands of the Sinaloa Cartel, but as one of Mexico's major cartels, it is certain that they have claimed their fair share of the 50,000 victims since 2006 in Mexico alone.

During the past century, the two biggest threats that Chicago has seen are the kingpins of gangs that earn their vast profits by bootlegging—first alcohol and now drugs. This is not some sort of unfortunate accident. The federal government creates these criminals—and these criminal organizations—when it declares certain substances illegal.

The sale of "controlled" substances is a lucrative business thanks to the risks involved. But it's not just extra-normal profits that result from prohibition. It’s crime organized on a massive scale, violent turf wars that kill tens of thousands each year, and entire communities threatened by cultures of corruption. None of this is new. We saw it during the '20s, and we’re seeing it now with our never-ending war on drugs.

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  • Night Elf Mohawk||

    But that's... different.... somehow.

  • ||

    Yes, the first Prohibition required a constitutional amendment, but this second one didn't for some reason. See how different they are?

  • Ghetto Slovak Goatherder||

    Seriously. Why does no one ever talk about this point?

  • Pro Libertate||

    Really, I'm glad that we have unlimited government. Makes the practice of law so much easier: "Just do whatever the government tells you to do. Yes, yes, I know, but that was last week. Do what they're saying now."

  • R C Dean||

    If you've got any kind of regulatory compliance practice, that's pretty much what you do.

    CMS no longer even bothers to go through the bother of promulgating notice-and-comment rules, and hasn't for years. They just issue edicts via their various manuals and publications.

    Pointing out that these are not valid APA regulations, are not authorized by statute, are not consistent with validly promulgated rules, etc., is pointless.

    "It puts the regulations in its policies, or it gets the audit again."

  • Pro Libertate||

    Things really have changed in the last decade. Back in my banking days, I used to challenge state regulators with the following statement, "Show me the black-letter authority for what you're telling us to do." Back then, that could work, though even then, there was the risk of retaliation in some other matter.

  • R C Dean||

    I can still do that with the state regulators (and I do). With CMS, though, its better phrased as a request for the Manual provision, guidance letter, or cocktail napkin containing the "law".

  • Pro Libertate||

    That whole arbitrary and capricious business in Administrative Law. . .that was just some sick law professor joke, wasn't it?

  • sloopyinca||

    "It puts the regulations in its policies, or it gets the audit again."

    +1 human suit

  • John||

    El Chapo. Mexican gangsters have the best nick names.

  • Pro Libertate||

    And it can be anything. "El Lapiz is a heartless killer."

  • John||

    El gato grande

  • Pro Libertate||

    La Boca.

  • ||

    "El pollo loco"

  • Hugh Akston||

    El Pollo del Mar

  • ||

    So we're all revealing our luchador names?

  • Hugh Akston||

    If that were the case, ProLib would have posted El Pantera Rosa.

  • Pro Libertate||

    El Rabo de Toro.

  • ||

    Don't give him ideas, Hugh. He's been looking to change his persona since he's kind of played out El hombretón.

  • Pro Libertate||

    Los Pantalones.

  • sloopyinca||

    El Cabroncito!

  • Pro Libertate||

    El Brazo Fuerte.

  • John||

    That would be a smart one Episiarch. The cops would think you owned a chain of chicken joints and have no idea you were a gangster.

  • sloopyinca||

    Jesus, a gangster that not only breaks drug policy, but also disregards IP protections to boot.

  • John||

    You know it would be so much worse if Price Pfister were making that three billion dollars a year selling all those drugs legally. It would just be chaos I tell you.

  • ||

    Naw, man, the drug companies don't want weed to be legal, cuz, like you can't patent it and stuff, man.

    /hippietard

  • John||

    Because they are illegal, I doubt there has been much serious funded research into making these drugs safer and more effective. Maybe I am wrong, but I would imagine one of the big Ag companies could work with the drug companies and come up with some pretty mind blowing shit.

  • BakedPenguin||

    Just removing the contaminants would be a great start. It's not methamphetamine that melts faces, it's un-reacted phosphorus, lye, etc. Also, because it's cheaper to smuggle the most concentrated forms of the drugs. I don't know if I'd want to do legal heroin, but I sure would enjoy smoking legal opium.

  • John||

    I don't know that I would want to do pharmaceutical grade cocaine. But I sure as hell would rather do that than Meth.

    Funny how the media or the cops never mention that it is the additives in meth that kill you not the speed itself.

  • ||

    Cocaine is not like doing heroin. The purer the cocaine, the better the euphoria, but it's not going to OD you like heroin because you didn't gauge the purity correctly. I would love to get pharmaceutical cocaine.

    And fuck meth. There's no euphoria. Boring.

  • John||

    My theory is avoid whatever drugs poor people do. Do the drugs rich celebrities do. If meth were that fun instead of being total shit with the single virtue of being cheap, rich people would be doing it.

  • Zeb||

    I'd say just avoid synthetic drugs that people make in soda bottles. Rich people do speed too. They just get the good stuff.

  • ||

    meth-heads describe the high as like a 6 hr long orgasm.

    i trust them - meth is hella fun.

    it just has a very low-class cache, which keeps the celebrities away. it's not glamorous.

    btw, speaking of heroin...

    dandy warhols are a underrated pac nw band imo
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APrpB-i4d_E

  • SIV||

    That theory fails because rich and poor tend to favor the same drugs.

  • BakedPenguin||

    Some users say that meth is euphoric, so it may just be you. A lot of people say Xanax is 'fun', but for me it's only a fucking sleeping pill.

  • ||

    Every time I've done any kind of amphetamine I get nothing off of it but alertness. Nothing. It might be just me.

    Take a 10 Valium and knock back a few high ABV beers over the next 30 minutes. You will start to feel awesome. It works with Xanax too but Valium is better.

  • Zeb||

    I feel the same about amphetamines (never done meth). They can be useful, but, never what I would call fun. I'm not much for stimulants in general, though. If anything is going to prevent me from falling asleep, I'd better be tripping balls.

  • BakedPenguin||

    Up to 1965, methamphetamine was available over the counter. That's another thing that goes unsaid. Funny that the drug didn't cause massive problems until after the government made it illegal.

    It's almost as if the War on Drugs makes everything about drug use more dangerous.

  • ||

    i've been in a bunch of meth labs, and to put it bluntly, their "sterile procedure" and lab technique leaves something to be desired.

  • kinnath||

    The only way that drug prohibition ends is when Big Pharma decides there's gold in them thar hills and then they out bid Big Police in campaign contributions.

  • wareagle||

    don't the feds hold the patents on pot anyway? In terms of using it for non-recreational purposes anyway.

  • BakedPenguin||

    It's possible that marijuana legalization causes a few to reconsider their positions, but you're probably right.

  • kinnath||

    I would expect Archer-Daniel-Midlands to be all over weed legalization. But Big Pharma would probably stick to synthesizing compounds.

  • Zeb||

    I think that the coke heroin and meth are more what he's thinking of. Who the fuck still buys Mexican weed anyway?

    And it's not as if big companies have never used influence in government to protect their rackets. I bet they wouldn't like to see opiates rescheduled either.

  • ||

    The thing is, if all drugs were legalized the pharmaceutical companies would make SO MUCH MORE money just on volume alone. It's not like Vicodin costs anything anyway.

  • John||

    They have to know that. I think they are just terrified of the political effects of advocating for legalization. They get demonized enough for making drugs that save peoples lives. How much would the leftards hate them if they made drugs people enjoyed?

  • kinnath||

    Imagine the opportunities to market a viagra/cocaine combo pack for those guys that need a little pick-me-up at the end of a long day at work.

  • itsnotmeitsyou||

    I was thinking viagra/X combo pack.

  • Zeb||

    Yes, I suppose that is true. But unfortunately, that is not going to happen and the drug companies know it.

  • sloopyinca||

    Not to be a dickhole or anything, but doesn't Price Pfistr make faucets and other plumbing items?

  • BakedPenguin||

    Pretty sure he was thinking of Pfizer.

  • Ted S.||

    The Pfabulous Pfentanyl with the Pfunny name.

  • derpules||

    Preacher meet choir

  • Tonio||

    Five million yankee dollars for his arrest and conviction. Somehow I don't think that reward will ever be payed out. *cough* Dorner *cough*

  • ||

    SAY HELLO TO HIS LITTLE FRIEND

  • John||

    And it won't do any good, needless to say. We have found out with Al Qaeda that the only way to disrupt an organization is to kill or capture most of its mid level people. Taking out the leader does nothing but give his number 2 a promotion. And even if you do wipe this one out, another one will rise in its place. The opportunity to make $3 billion a year tends to create a desire for the job no matter how risky it is.

  • Romulus Augustus||

    But what good is his wealth? Is El Chapo cavorting in Gsstad this time of year, or in Barbadoes? He's probably looking over his shoulder 24/7 andf suspicious of even the bimbos sharing his bed. How do these El Hefes survive a week running a gang?

  • John||

    I was thinking that too. He is a pretty stupid gangster. The point of being a gangster is being one while keeping the cops from figuring out that is what you are. Capone, lived in a huge mansion in Florida and counted his millions before the Feds got him.

  • ||

    Because everyone beneath him is terrified that if they try to take him out and fail, they will die the most horrible tortured death imaginable?

    "If you come at the king, you best not miss."

  • PapayaSF||

    What the hell is it with people people who add cents to large numbers? "$5,000,000.00"? Give me frickin' break.

  • ||

    I'd rather deal with this guy than Tuco Salamanca. That blue shit may be the bomb but it makes that dude even crazier.

  • BakedPenguin||

    Need a lawyer, sage?

  • ||

    How about if you wiggle your way down to $400k?

  • Pro Libertate||

    Don't forget Adam Reposa!

  • Raston Bot||

    How much of El Chapo's revenue is tied to cannabis? I've seen wide estimates from 20-70%.

  • ||

    It's got to be Joeqin Loera guy! No way its shitty gun laws, or rampant corruption in the political system that is fostering this crime! I agree, its got to be because of this powerful drug guy 2,000 miles away. Why he picked Chicago (of all places!)? We won't know until he's brought to justice.

  • Hugh Akston||

    Not since 1930 has Chicago declared anyone “Public Enemy No. 1,”

    I thought Chicagoans elected their Public Enemy #1. Isn't it Rahm Emmanuel?

  • PapayaSF||

    He's Public Enema #1.

  • CE||

    Meanwhile, casualties have been low in the Budweiser-vs.-Coors turf wars over beer sales.

  • ||

    The fuck you doing bringing facts into this? PEOPLE ARE DYING

  • brlfq||

    50,000 victims since 2006

    I know that drugs are illegal there, and that they share a huge border with the U.S., but it's still shocking that so many Canadians are killing each other.

  • Tulpa (LAOL-PA)||

    The federal government creates these criminals—and these criminal organizations—when it declares certain substances illegal.

    You think Guzman would have led a life as an honest private sector worker if it weren't for the drug laws? I don't think so. He'd still be a criminal, most likely, he would just stick with kidnapping and murder for hire.

  • Brendan||

    Uh huh.

    I don't think the market for non-drug related kidnapping and murder is big enough to support all of these guys in a post end-of-drug-war world.

  • عراقنا الجريح||

    Nicest chat and chat Iraqi entertaining Adject all over the world

    http://www.iraaqna.com

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