Obamacare Debacle Derails President’s Credibility

Further evidence that government that governs best governs least.

The latest Fox News poll finds 55 percent of Americans now disapprove of President Obama’s general job performance and 61 percent specifically disapprove of his health care handling, the highest numbers since they first began asking these questions in 2009. Not even during the IRS or AP scandals, NSA revelations, or Syria debacle did Obama’s favorability ratings take such a hit.

President Obama’s personal image has also been tainted: now a majority (52 percent) of Americans do not find the president honest or trustworthy, the highest level since Quinnipiac began asking the question. Just two years ago Obama enjoyed a +32 advantage on trust (63 to 31 percent). Moreover, most Americans (56 percent) also lack the confidence in Obama’s leadership ability to effectively implement the new health care law.

Public confidence has waned not just for the president but Obama’s signature health care law as well. Gallup finds support for the law is now underwater by 15 points, with 55 percent who disapprove and 40 percent who approve, the highest disapproval and approval gap since Gallup began asking the question. Perhaps one reason for this decline is that nearly six in 10 Americans believe the Obama administration purposely tried to deceive the public regarding the health care law.

These numbers are unsurprising given the inauspicious launch of the online health insurance exchanges. The administration’s figures indicate they have fallen 80 percent short of predictions, with only 106,000 enrollments. Not only that but only about a quarter of these came from the 26 federally run exchanges, which have been even more glitch-ridden, than state run exchanges. The administration’s economic modeling originally predicted 500,000 sign ups and they need about seven million to enroll by March. To meet this the threshold, 13 times as many people would need to sign up each month than they did in October.

This is not unbeknownst to the public; 83 percent of Americans say they have seen, read, or heard news coverage about the problems people have reported experiencing using the federal exchanges. Only 29 percent say the exchanges are working well.

The administration had promised to fix exchange website problems by November 30, as Jeff Zients former White House budget director leading the effort to fix the federal exchange websites, confirmed: "We are confident that by the end of the month of November, HealthCare.gov will operate smoothly."  Nevertheless, only 31 percent of Americans actually believe that prediction, and 69 percent are not confident the administration will fulfill their promise. In fact, a recent NBC/WSJ poll found only 37 percent believe the website problems are “short-term technical issues” that can be corrected.

Even assuming a fix by November 30th, this puts consumers on a tight timeline to purchase coverage by December 15 for policies that begin on January 1, the date by which the ACA mandates most Americans have health insurance.

Beyond glitch-ridden websites, millions of Americans have received notices their insurance policies are being canceled because they failed to meet the ACA’s minimum requirements as determined by the federal government. While Obama has contended these policies were “sub par” anyway, Americans do not necessarily agree with this assessment. In fact, four times as many say the law changed their policy for the worse (21 percent) than the better (6 percent).

The millions of cancelled policies have further undermined president Obama’s credibility on health care because he repeatedly promised Americans: “if you like your insurance plan, you can keep it.” Indeed, the law explicitly included a ‘grandfather clause’ for existing policies, but as is the case with most regulation, federal officials failed to predict how the law would operate in practice. As Philip Klein at the Washington Examiner has explained, even slight changes to a grandfathered insurance policy would strip its status. 

Nevertheless, most Americans don’t believe these cancelled policies were unforeseen. Instead, six in 10 say the Obama administration knew in advance that people would be kicked off their insurance policies, and half think Obama knowingly lied when he promised people they could keep their plans. Making matters worse, 58 percent think Obama only apologized for the cancellations for “political reasons” while 38 percent thought he was sincere.

The combination of cancelled policies and dysfunctional websites created the possibility that a substantial share of Americans could lose their “subpar” plans and be unable to enroll in the exchanges, putting them at risk of being fined. This is why Obama announced today an “administrative” (rather than legislative) fix aimed to delay the eventual cancellation of policies for one year.

However, insurance groups warned that such a last minute cancellation delay could risk destabilizing the market and result in higher premiums for consumers. Karen Ignagni, president of America’s Health Insurance Plans warned “If now fewer younger and healthier people choose to purchase coverage in the exchange, premiums will increase and there will be fewer choices for consumers.” In other words, delaying cancellations could deter the youngest and healthiest Americans from obtaining insurance on the exchange, and as Politico writes: “free them of helping to foot the bill for everyone else.”

One needn’t be partisan to recognize that implementation of the federal health care law has been a mess thus far. The mess cannot simply be blamed on Republican sabotage or the Republican governors, as has been suggested. Instead, Americans place responsibility on the Obama administration (39 percent) and the contractors who designed the exchange websites (20 percent); only 4 percent blame Republican governors and 11 percent blame Congressional Republicans.

Altogether, the implementation debacle has resulted in Americans being as likely to trust Republicans with handling health care as Obama (43 to 42 percent respectively). This is particularly astounding for three reasons. First, Obama used to enjoy a +20 point advantage in 2009 before the law passed when the public trusted him 53 to 33 to handle health care policy. Second, just a few weeks, ago the Republican Party brand tanked during the shutdown, with favorability sinking to its lowest levels in decades. And lastly, health care has traditionally been a Democratic “owned” issue.

The key issue at stake here is trust, or a lack of it. Remaking the health care system—no matter the noble intentions—is a significant task and one that requires the public to have a high level of confidence in government’s efficacy. These recent poll numbers clearly indicate Obama and his administration have suffered a severe blow to their credibility. Americans are skeptical not only of the administration’s efficacy but its integrity to be honest with them.

Circumstances like these undermine the president’s contention that Americans should “reject these voices” that “incessantly warn of government.” While the current issue at hand is not a malicious power grab, it surely demonstrates the limits to what government as an institution is capable of doing, lending further credence to the idea that a government that governs best governs least.

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  • Death Rock and Skull||

    This ruined his credibility? Just now? It wasn't already a train wreck?

  • ||

    I thought only the members of his cult thought he had any credibility from day one.

    I think the problem is that his cult is getting smaller as the less fanatical members leave.

    At the rate he is crashing and burning, by the time he is out no one will admit that they were ever a moonie...I mean obamabot.

  • Ayn Random Variation||

    Check the poll numbers from above again. There seems to be a core 40% or so who are still going down with the ship.

  • ||

    It took a while, but eventually Iraq started cutting into Bush's core support. I expect the ACA over the next year will hurt Obama similarly.

  • ||

    I see the poll numbers. Lets have a look at them again after the website is never fixed and the employer mandate kicks in.

    Only the hardest core fanatic will be able to keep licking his boots when they find they cant keep their doctor or their bank account. And lets not forget all the cases that will be in the news of idiots getting 'free' sex change operations.

    His policies are the perfect combo of insult to injury.

  • VG Zaytsev||

    Yep.

  • ||

    Perhaps the IPAB will save us by declaring sex changes medically unnecessary.

  • soflarider||

    How then can I ever hope to use my birth control and maternity benefits?

  • VG Zaytsev||

    Check the poll numbers from above again. There seems to be a core 40% or so who are still going down with the ship.

    Nah, there's about 35% of the people that will vote for either party in every state. Doesn't mean that they'll continue to support Obama (whatever that even means). Hard core self identified progressives are consistently around 20% of those polled.

  • Carolynp||

    And a chunk of those cannot be convinced. Remember the argument "you never liked this legislation anyway"? The only way this becomes an attack is in the faith based movement. You didn't believe enough, if only more people had stronger faith, then this would have worked. It's unbelievable how insane these people are.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    "He didn't fail us; we failed him."

    Listen for it.

  • John C. Randolph||

    Train wreck? No, It was a maglev monorail wreck!

    -jcr

  • PapayaSF||

    "It's not the Hindenburg or the Titanic, it's the Hindenburg crashing into the Titanic."

  • AuH20||

    And this is what will ultimately be his downfall, if it continues. People are really willing to forgive someone for being a shitty President, especially when the media is willing to deflect any claim of incompetence by bringing up TEH EVIL RETHUGLICANS!. They will forgive because a lot of people approach politics emotionally. What someone's specific positions are matters less (as long as they fall in a general range of what is considered "sensible" by the Establishment) than the fact that doggonit, they just like that gal or guy.

    But when they stop liking a politician, on a personal level? People will read ill intent into the smallest of actions. Obama walking his dog will turn from "A cute family moment, and aw shucks, what a regular guy" to "What a photo op hunting douchebag!"

    This is going to be fun, if this trend keeps up for a few months and cements itself with at least some of the population.

  • ||

    At some point the delaying will be over and all of the insurance policies that dont measure up to obamacare will be cancelled. I have heard the number 100 million, or close to it, tossed around.

    Couple that with the complete abortion that is the obamacare website and peoples inability to get any insurance at all and you have the makings for the most hated president ever. HOpefully this will be the end of progressivism.

  • Raven Nation||

    "Hopefully this will be the end of progressivism."

    I so admire optimism.

  • Longtorso, Johnny||

    Just like Peron's failures turned Argentina into a libertarian paradise.

  • Longtorso, Johnny||

    Or the USSR's failures turning Russia into a libertarian paradise.

  • Francisco d Anconia||

    Look at Chile.

  • Carolynp||

    Venezuela...

  • ||

    You are killing me.

    A tiny deluded part of me wants to believe that americans are different.

  • Carolynp||

    We are. The US has never before willingly slipped on the manacles of socialism. Sigh...

  • ||

    So who do you think FDR was?

  • Faceless Commenter||

    Bit of a scheming bully, wasn't he?

  • Carolynp||

    Point.

  • SusanM||

    FDR was a politician who had the good fortune to have power in a crisis.

  • PapayaSF||

    A major setback, but not a permanent end. Emotions and religions like progressivism are largely immune to evidence and logic.

  • c5c5||

    Papaya,

    I agree. People MUST have something to hang onto and to continually give them hope.

    As disastrous as the failure of O-care will be, people will eventually come bouncing back to support government.

    When more "free" things are promised to more people, people will forget the mistakes of the past.

  • Res ipsa loquitur||

    Not only will the trend continue, it will accelerate. There are two major issues about to rear their head with regard to Ocare.
    1) You can keep your doctor. Nope, when millions of people start losing their doctor and get pushed into some cheap alternative the anger will increase.
    2) The big one, next year when the employer mandate kicks in. You think this year was fun with a few million people losing their coverage, wait until 2014 ! Tens of millions of our fellow citizens will be dumped from their plans onto the exchanges by companies trying to stay competitive or because their plans don't meet the exacting standards the great bringer of light created.

    Today is just the appetizer, the wetting of ones appetite. I am almost giddy about the chaos and insanity which next year will bring. Sadly, you can't eat an omelette without knowing millions of our fellow citizens are suffering...oh well !

  • Sevo||

    Res ipsa loquitur|11.17.13 @ 3:29PM|#
    "Not only will the trend continue, it will accelerate"

    Pretty sure there will be a short-term spike also:
    The web site will not be "fixed" by the end of this month; it'll be 'fixed' which means a lot of folks are going to go through what should be a happy holiday season wondering what in hell they're going to do come 1/1/14.
    Folks will tend to remember that.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    1/1/14, how many millions will be stuck?

    No website, no subsidies.
    No subsidies, no insurance.
    No insurance, no medical care.

    This doesn't require a Plan B; this requires emergency treatment. What does the fleet, hard-working, clear-eyed Obama have in mind?

    Does it snow in D.C.? It seems to me the only thing that will save O from a Million Patient March will be the fact that the calamity is scheduled for January.

  • Sevo||

    Faceless Commenter|11.17.13 @ 4:27PM|#
    "No website, [...] no medical care."

    No bishops, no King.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    I had to look that up. Learn something every day.

    And how ironic that Obama's "bishops" are not people who at least have some semblance of learning, but the most ignorant, lazy, and undeveloped intellects in America.

  • Libertarius||

    Nuh-uh, they have hip outfits and tattoos and listen to NPR.

  • Carolynp||

    "...No insurance, no medical care." Disagree. The twenty year study from Oregon proved that having additional government intervention had no impact on patient outcomes. This proves something amusing. When the cash stops flowing, no one will actually unplug granny. What will happen is that the same crowd who never intended to pay for coverage will find the cash in their budget to pay a doctor. The folks who literally can't afford to pay, still won't pay. The only thing this might impact is cosmetic surgery, and that's guesswork on my part.

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    You mean the Medicaid study? That was only 2 years, but it did show no statistically significant improvement in physical patient outcomes. They felt better emotionally though, so, um, puppies and unicorns and stuff.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    I thought that study blasted the case that free preventive care improves health outcomes.

    I acknowledge that happily!

    I'm talking about people who are actually sick and who will have no insurance come January, like those cancer patients who've been kicked off their plans and who can't afford the Obamacare replacements. I know I've seen two people in the news who say they're going to pay the fine and let nature take its course.

  • JWatts||

    Having your health insurance cancelled and not having an affordable replacement will be the topic of a lot of Thanksgiving meals. Statistically, a lot of those meals will have somebody personally affected.

  • Christophe||

    And I'm sure Greenwald's keeping an NSA pocket-nuke-level revelation for that time as well.

  • PapayaSF||

    And don't forget the spike when the IRS starts docking tax refunds.

  • ||

    I am wondering now what his downfall will look like. It might be quite a messy and painful affair for us all.

    Still, if people learn their lesson about progressivism and they have to go back underground again for a generation or two, it will be worth it.

  • BakedPenguin||

    This is what I'm hoping. There will always be true believers, but hopefully the vast majority of mushy leftists who just want to feel good about their politics will wise up.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    I'll say it again: we need to work "care" and "dot-gov" to point out vast government schemes the same way we've used "gate" to indicate scandals.

    EducationCare. ImmigrationCare. DietCare. ClimateCare.

    Credit to Reason's Ronald Bailey for "ClimateCare." Let's carry on!

  • wadair||

    "Care" also has a leftist/progressive feel to it.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    Good idea to co-opt it now, with all its sweet and lethal irony. Every time Hillary utters the word "care," a vast, collective shudder should go down the nation's spine.

  • PapayaSF||

    I love this. The next crisis in the Middle East can be called IranCare, etc.

  • ||

    I like it, but I don't think it quite works. ObamaCare was a takeoff on HillaryCare in the first place.

  • ||

    Hilarycare failed as a legislative act.

    Obamacare failed as big government implemented policy.

    The meaning of Obamacare has grown into something else entirely. With a far more negative tone in regards to the role of government.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    Don't quibble!

  • ||

    ImmigrationCare

    huh? Removing barriers for people to choose which country they live and work is a "vast government scheme"?

    I would think the corrupt failing and unjust immigration scheme we have now would fit the bill more.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    Beware 1700-page bills that claim to fix it.

  • ||

    Indeed. The current immigration bill does absolutely nothing to solve the underlying problem - which is that there is no legal path to immigration for unskilled workers who don't have immediate family in the US.

    All it does is legalize people already here and then throw in a lot of extra meddling and enforcement - like E-Verify.

  • bob sacomano||

    Please let it be so. The scourge of progressivism will likely never be fully killed off, but if it can be downgraded and relegated to the wilderness for a decade or two...

    I keep saying that a return of the DLC is inevitable, even in the unlikely event that Her Royal Septuagenarian Highness accedes to the throne. Behold the return of "Democrat Centrism!"

    Still makes me wanna barf, but it's miles better than being governed by the whims of Slate and Salon...

  • Sevo||

    "only 31 percent of Americans actually believe that prediction"

    When Nixon was driven from office, I remember an article that said 25% of the public is going to support an incumbent regardless. What's the margin of error in this survey?

  • Rich||

    Alt-text: "You know, it could be a question of blood flow."

  • Slammer||

    "These urinal cakes with the Constitution on them are kind of cool."

  • The Late P Brooks||

    The Bullshit is Out There.

  • The Late P Brooks||

    The latest Fox News poll finds 55 percent of Americans now disapprove of President Obama’s general job performance and 61 percent specifically disapprove of his health care handling

    Nobody cares about bogus Faux Nooz disinformation!

    HE'S THE BESTEST PRESIDENT EVAAAAAAR!!1111!!

  • Faceless Commenter||

    Are you ready? Are you ready? Life imitates The Onion: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/.....80675.html

  • Sevo||

    I got a paragraph into it before I checked the top and found it wasn't Onion.

  • LynchPin1477||

    Holy shit, that was written 2 days ago??!! Has that guy even been paying attention for the last 2 weeks, let alone the last 5 years? I've read some pretty remarkable text-based fellatio of Obama, but that takes the cake. It's like he is writing about a completely different person.

  • LynchPin1477||

    And the author has a doctorate. Say what you want about academia, but at the very least I would hope that someone with an Ed.D. would at least be capable of understanding the difference between reality and imagination.

  • Sevo||

    It is a doctorate, but it's an Ed. doctorate. That doesn't make me confident of any particular logical skills.

  • Agammamon||

    Yeah, an Ed doctorate is, like, barely an Associates in a real discipline.

  • ||

    When someone flaunts their degree (and this is an extremely unimpressive degree) to attempt to sound authoritative in an area unrelated to their professional specialty, the Hack-O-Meter ought to pin at 100%.

    Old Man With Candy, B.A. (physics), Ph.D. (chemistry)

  • Res ipsa loquitur||

    When your #1 reason Obama is the greatest of all ever is "He is for the People", whatever that means, I think it pretty much means your argument fucking blows.

    How about any quantitative examples of why he is the bestest, such as the US Debt is down, actual unemployment is down, the average income is up, we have no drone attacks going on, the NSA isn't spying on us, personal liberties are at an all time high, etc.

    Fuck, that guy is an idiot.

  • Habeas Dorkus||

    The person who wrote that must have had a father who abused him.
    No other circumstance could explain his saccharine worship of this president. Not only is it abysmal writing; it's an embarrassment of non-logic with a secular religious fervor for the Chosen One.
    The essay also represents how sad the state of our union is, and people's complete ignorance about the spirit and founding of America.
    I'm just ... I weep.

  • Carolynp||

    I wouldn't do that quite yet. My twelve year old lectured a guy in the grocery store line the other day on how his co-exist bumper sticker can only become a reality with small de-centralized government. He regularly spars in the WSJ comment board. It's hilarious that they don't know his age and that they are being fairly done in.

  • Irish||

    My twelve year old lectured a guy in the grocery store line the other day on how his co-exist bumper sticker can only become a reality with small de-centralized government.

    Wonderful. I've been pointing this out to leftists for years. You cannot have a long term multicultural society with a powerful centralized government because different cultures will always use the apparatus of the state to oppress other cultures.

    That's what you're seeing now. People in the South and Midwest are vastly different culturally than people in the Northeast or west coast and a large portion of the partisan hatreds we're seeing are the result of one culture oppressing another with government force.

  • ||

    People in the South and Midwest are not really that different culturally than people from the Northeast or West Coast. REGION WAR lovers like to think so (I'm not saying you are one of them), but frankly, we're not that different from Europeans, let alone fellow Americans. Put one of us in a small town in Germany or France and other than the language, we will be perfectly at home. We are all children of Rome.

  • Irish||

    Yes, there is no difference between a southerner's beliefs about gun control and a New Yorker's. They also have identical opinions about race, gender, religion, and economics.

    That's ridiculous, Epi. It's true that Europeans and Americans are part of an overarching 'western culture' and that Southerners and people from New England have similarities inherent to Americans, but that doesn't change the fact that there are major differences as well.

  • ||

    So please explain me and all the people I know from Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and the rest of New England who are anti-gun control and anti-government in the way that you would attribute to other regions.

    The belief that people in "blue" states or "red" states are monolithic is ridiculous. I remember friends of my father bragging about their completely and totally illegal full-auto AK-47s that they brought back from Vietnam. This was in Connecticut. Just because I like lobster and clam chowder doesn't mean I'm completely different from someone from North Carolina (where I used to go to summer camp, by the way).

  • NotAnotherSkippy||

    MA has 100% Team Blue representation. Tell me that's a mixed and balanced state. Sure, there are some Team Red and some Libs there but 100%...

  • Irish||

    Of course when you're talking about this you're speaking in generalities. Call me a collectivist all you want, but generally speaking people in different places have different things they value, different things they enjoy, and different beliefs they hold dear.

    I live in Chicagoland. Are you really going to try and tell me that someone in the hyper-Republican district that my parents live in is culturally similar to someone living in the inner city? In that case we're talking about people who live within 15 miles of one another.

    As for your 'we're all children of Rome!' argument, you can't seriously be arguing that the people actually living in modern Rome aren't culturally distinct from Americans.

    You're also ignoring the fact that a large number of people currently living in America are not of Northwestern European descent and therefore aren't children of Rome. Large numbers of people are from Mexico or other Latin American countries, not to mention the fact that 30% of the people living in Dearborn, Michigan speak Arabic as their first language.

    Are you going to tell me that people who moved here from Saudi Arabia are not going to have some things that render them culturally distinct from other Americans?

  • ||

    Don't move goalposts, dude. My point is that people who grow up as Americans--whatever their ethnic origin--are much more similar than REGION WAR promoters would like to admit. And I don't know about you, but I've been involved with Europeans, and they are far more like us than you think. If you could improve my terrible Italian with some magical spell, I could fit in in some small Calabrian town no problem. And I have known many Europeans who have come here and they are not culture shocked.

    Also, Seahawks just intercepted Ponder for a pick six and are killing the Vikings. Weirdly, it is raining at CenturyLink but not on my deck, even though CenturyLink is less than a mile away.

  • Habeas Dorkus||

    "Progressives" largely come from insular academic circles in big cities.
    In Montana, we deeply distrust those forces. I used to think "Don't Californicate Montana" bumper stickers were merely tribalistic secretions. I find myself agreeing with them more and more as I grow older.
    Most of the bad ideas of big-city liberals have now infiltrated "progressive-minded" cities in the West, including Missoula, Montana.

  • Red Rocks Rockin||

    I find myselef agreeing with them more and as I grow older.
    Most of the bad ideas of big-city liberals have now infiltrated "progressive-minded" cities in the West, including Missoula, Montana.

    I think the caveat with a state like Montana is that the liberalism of the stripe you describe will likely be limited to very localized areas where those ideas would already be germinating anyway--Missoula's a college town and thus would already be heavily influenced by the leftist mandarin class that lives there.

  • ||

    Missoula is less Californicated than Bozeman, so you got that goin' for ya.

    Personally, I love Butte. Lived there for a year and I'd go back in a second if I could.

  • Rufus J. Firefly||

    Shit, I'm half Calabrian and wouldn't make it there! ;

  • Bill Dalasio||

    If you could improve my terrible Italian with some magical spell, I could fit in in some small Calabrian town no problem.

    Well, only if, by "fitting in" you mean get laughed at by the locals as the silly American who thinks he's gone native.

  • Redmanfms||

    So please explain me and all the people I know from Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and the rest of New England who are anti-gun control and anti-government in the way that you would attribute to other regions.

    Urban versus rural.

    That does end up representing regionally.

  • Bill Dalasio||

    Sorry, but this seems like arguing that, unless something is universally true, no generalities exist. And that's just not true. Your friends from the Northeast have probably learned to hold their tongue when the topic of gun control comes up that they probably wouldn't have to in a North Carolina or a Texas. That speaks to a cultural difference.

  • Habeas Dorkus||

    Epi:
    In Montana, we have gun racks in the back of our trucks. They tote high-powered semi-automatic rifles.
    Every day, they roll down the road. Nobody blinks, or cares.
    You put a vehicle like that in Chicago, New York or Los Angeles, and there would be police and news helicopters swarming overhead. There'd be talk about a gun-toting lunatic driving around looking for somebody to shoot.
    Don't give me your shit about the relative homogeneity of American culture.

  • bob sacomano||

    Bastiat agrees. There is no more noxious concept divined by human intelligence than that of "legal plunder." Recently I've found that hammering this point to progressives has actually found some purchase. Ultimately their emotionalism and faux-moralism prevents them from converting, but at least I've been able to force a few to truly question their belief system.

  • Rich||

    Obama also passed the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African-Americans and the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics to ensure equal education for people of color.

    Why does Obama hate Whites and Asians?

  • Irish||

    Educational Excellence for African-Americans and the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanics to ensure equal education for people of color.

    And has there been any evidence that either of these laws worked or is going to work? Oh, there's not?

    I guess I forgot that in the progressive mind Laws Are Magic.

  • PapayaSF||

    Indeed. A year or so ago an ex-Facebook friend listed a bunch of wonderful things Obama had done, and one was "started a commission" on something or other. Oooooh, a commission! Nobody had ever done that before! And they are always so helpful!

  • LynchPin1477||

    12. He is for entertaining the masses.

    Well, I have enjoyed the past month and a half.

  • Irish||

    12. He is for entertaining the masses.

    Caligula is the best Emperor ever since he throws great circuses and there have been some really wonderful exhibitions down at the Coliseum!

  • Sevo||

    Don't you love when proggies refer to "the masses"?

  • ||

    I'm more of a Commodus kind of guy. He had a flair for the theatrical.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    Well, I have enjoyed the past month and a half.

    hahaha.

    I actually hadn't read through the whole thing, so I took a look at that.

    when the man does finally retire from politics, he has a rewarding and lucrative job as a stand up comic awaiting him if he so chooses.

    The unintentional hits will keep on coming!

  • Rufus J. Firefly||

    Send in the clown.

    All he's missing is a juggling act.

  • ||

    A lot has happened since then. I am loyal to the Democratic Party and to my president, but I am not blind, deaf or dumb. I recognize that Obama has made more than one controversial decision and rocked the boat a time or two during his presidency. Sure, he has committed his share of blunders and tripped over his own words from time to time.

    Doesn't this person know Obama doesn't sugar coat things? Holy crap.

  • ||

    I can't wait for this tool's inevitable workplace shooting rampage when he finally accepts reality. He is going to be pissed.

  • Tybus||

    "I stood alongside people of color across the nation as we celebrated America's first inauguration of a black president."

    Is that a nice way of saying coloreds (sic?)?. Regardless what a fucking hero for associating with people of other races.

  • Tybus||

    Disregard the second part..He prefers his own..didn't read but two sentences in.

  • ||

    I was laughing and shaking my head until I got to number ten. I nearly spit out my drink.

    Holy gods that guy is deluded to the point of being psychotic.

    And the comments....

  • ||

    And the best part is that he is an unadulterated racist. Just because political correctness won't call him one doesn't mean he isn't a flat-out collectivist racist. Disgusting.

  • LynchPin1477||

    After reading some of these comments I really have to stand back ! What this President has been put through is revolting & shameful ! I do not know how he and his family have retained their dignity and goodwill through the last 5 years! It would have broken so many others ! It is a testament to their strength and kindness....
  • Irish||

    Worst comment section: New York Times, Huffington Post, or any article that Drudge links to.

  • LynchPin1477||

    But all we need to do is engage them in a thought experiment. Then they'll be libertarians for sure!

  • Irish||

    Answer: The worst comment section is any time Drudge links to an Infowars article.

    Thank you for playing.

  • LynchPin1477||

    Russ Brooks

    I support President Obama now and will continue to support him as our President of the United States until such time that he commits an illegal act that would terminate his presidency!

    Oh, where to begin...

  • Agammamon||

    But, but . . . when the *president* does it, its not illegal - head explodes

  • Irish||

    He is for the middle class. Here are just a few of the comments made by President Barack Obama in recent months: "Rebuilding our economy starts with strengthening the middle class. Extending tax breaks on 98 percent of families now would give hardworking Americans the security and confidence they need." In July 2012, during a visit to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, he said, "The vision of a strong middle class is what we're fighting for. What we need is somebody who's going to fight every single day to grow the middle class because that's how our economy grows, from the middle out, from the bottom up, where everybody has got a shot. That's how the economy grows." Enough said.

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Here are a few of the COMMENTS he's made?

    He's said he wants the middle class to do well! Greatest president ever!

  • dan'o||

    I made it to the 8th or 9th comment before my rage neared crescendo, melting away into a desolate morass of hopelessness in regards to our future that these morons vote.

  • Rufus J. Firefly||

    Jesus.

    Christ.

  • Eric Bana||

    Dear God why did you post that? I felt a knife in my heart with the comments. One was: "Is he perfect? No. But I'll stand with him!!"

    How the f*** is that possible? At least some people showed some ability to think.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    You had to elect the administration to find out what was in it. Incompetence. (Don't ask me why you had to re-elect the administration.)

  • ||

    "You got your incompetence in my peanut butter!"

    "You got your peanut butter in my incompetence!"

  • Ayn Random Variation||

    "President Obama’s personal image has also been tainted: now a majority (52 percent) of Americans do not find the president honest or trustworthy,"

    So.....48% of the country believes that he is honest and trustworthy?

  • Bardas Phocas||

    No. They just think he's dreamy and black.

  • Habeas Dorkus||

    I quit Facebook in 2010 when so many of my female "friends" posted that picture of a shirtless Obama running in the surf.
    Basically, their comments said, "I want to fuck that black man because he's going to rescue this country and my weathered clitoris."

  • Rich||

    my weathered clitoris

    Nice band name. Better than My Morning Jacket.

  • ||

    By itself it is sub par...the fact that it is in need of rescuing really makes the joke.

  • ||

    no. There is always a group (5-15%) who just don't know.

    His approval is at 39% I think. That is a good number one would assume think he is honest and trustworthy.

  • kinnath||

    Obama is dead meat when Salon starts to run stuff like this.

    http://www.salon.com/2013/11/1.....for_nixon/

    It’s difficult to know, in historical terms, how best to understand the monumental catastrophe of the Obamacare rollout. Is it yet another example of the pathological weakness and spinelessness of the Democratic Party, which never seems to get anything right and always prefers to negotiate itself into unnecessary compromise and ideological defeat?

    And

    As I and many other people have said already, Obama’s legacy is permanently contaminated by his immense expansion of the national-security state, by the global drone wars and the Panopticon-style electronic surveillance of everyone, everywhere, at all times. Now he’s on the verge of also becoming the president who had the chance to transform our overpriced, underperforming and profoundly unjust healthcare system in his grasp, and fumbled it at the last minute, Joe Pisarcik-style.

  • Sevo||

    "Now he’s on the verge of also becoming the president who had the chance to transform our overpriced, underperforming and profoundly unjust healthcare system..."

    Nope, he never had a ghost of a chance. He has no idea how to make it better, just ideas on how to expand government meddling.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    This is why leftists will never make it work. At bottom, they have no idea what they're doing.

  • Rufus J. Firefly||

    You know, I think I believe in that generalization. Leftists are clueless hacks. Yeah. I think I'll go with that.

  • Bill Dalasio||

    While that's true, I'd venture it's safe to say that libertarians wouldn't know what they were doing either. The difference is that libertarians would have the good sense to know that they had no idea what they were doing and leave people who know their own affairs free to manage them.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    Libertarians running a government would be hilarious. Get hired, suspend 90% of the laws, and resign 15 minutes later.

  • Redmanfms||

    Libertarians running a government would be hilarious. Get hired, suspend 90% of the laws, and resign 15 minutes later.

    I don't know that is necessarily true, there are plenty of fucked-up causeheads who claim to align with "l"ibertarians enough to be called libertarians themselves.

    Hell, most of the Reason staff have ridiculously anti-liberty beliefs wrt to a number of things. Gun control, carbon taxes, gay marriage (yeah, states forcing recognition of gay marriage and the subsequent CRA enforcement is NOT an in increase in overall liberty) are all bugaboo topics for libertarians that generate some wildly anti-liberty positions from some corners of the movement.

  • LynchPin1477||

    Yep. He didn't "fumble it at the last minute". He drove the length of the field in the wrong direction, and the only reason it doesn't count as a safety is that he never even had the ball in the first place.

  • Boisfeuras||

    So, he's the Roy Riegels of presidents.

  • Faceless Commenter||

    If leftists look good and hard, they should see in this dead meat the death of their movement. If Obama can't deliver their Eden, then who can?

    Maybe they'll conclude that Obama was their Manchurian candidate as they persist insanely with the 100-year-old myth that We Just Need To Get The Right People In There (which is coincidentally true of hereditary monarch too, fancy that). Or maybe they'll see some flaws in their philosophy or at least the hopelessness of institutionalizing it in America.

    Meanwhile, in the Irony Room, are Ezra Klein and John Judis, lamenting that this Obamacare catastrophe is vindicating conservative/libertarian hostility to big government. It's kind of hilarious, this discovery hasn't made them re-consider their own faith in big government even as they state quite loudly that Obamacare discredits it.

  • LynchPin1477||

    If Obama can't deliver their Eden, then who can?

    Never let them forget that Obama was sold as being the best that not only progressivism, but America itself, had to offer.

  • Alien Invader||

    To those who believe, no explanation is necessary. To those who don't, no explanation is possible.

    Given the way our media and educational system are rigged, it's astounding that we don't have a whole lot more believers.

  • ||

    the president who had the chance to transform our overpriced, underperforming and profoundly unjust healthcare system in his grasp, and fumbled it at the last minute

    Last minute? really?

    So the baked in flaws of Obamacare put in at the start just flies over the head of author. He did not see that every healthy young adult in the US would rationally choose the cheaper fine rather then pay for insurance which they can get anyway after they need it?

    He did not see that hiding costs from the consumer would make prices rise?

    He did not see a government mandated "market" can, by its very nature, never work?

  • Sevo||

    "He did not see a government mandated "market" can, by its very nature, never work?"

    I'll bet he thinks people *like* those fruit cakes he hands out at Christmas.

  • BuSab Agent||

    Hey everyone can always use another door stop.

  • Contrarian P||

    I'm waiting for the president to go Nino Brown and start handing out turkeys.

  • Fatty Bolger||

  • Red Rocks Rockin||

    Just to be clear, I personally hope that the wreckage of Obamacare can be duct-taped together, because it genuinely is preferable to the current “system,” which is more like an anti-system, a howling Lovecraftian void of quasi-libertarian delusions

    Farkin' LOL at that bit of nonsense. There's no reasonable dispute that our system is horribly dysfunctional and opaque, but it's not because it resembles a libertarian approach to healthcare in any sense. Guy's just lashing out at the boogeyman his SWPL coffeehouse clatch brainwashed him into directing his feral paranoia against.

  • GILMORE||

    "the Democratic Party, which... always prefers to negotiate itself into unnecessary compromise

    WHAT?

  • GILMORE||

    The full text of that statement is just appalling =

    "It’s difficult to know, in historical terms, how best to understand the monumental catastrophe of the Obamacare rollout. Is it yet another example of the pathological weakness and spinelessness of the Democratic Party, which never seems to get anything right and always prefers to negotiate itself into unnecessary compromise and ideological defeat? Or is it another symptom of our national refusal to pursue a rational and coherent healthcare policy, fueled partly by our bogus mythology of individualism and partly by the machinations of insurance-industry racketeers? Is there, to go one step further, a relationship between those two things?

    I think the answers are clearly yes, yes and yes"

    Read = According to douche-hat here, the reason the Democratic party *fails* is not because of failed ideas, but because of

    a) an over-willingness to compromise
    b) not pursuing FULL BLOWN SOCIALISM (which is the rational and coherent policy)
    c) because of Evil Capitalists undermining them

    Which, when you look at the claims being made, are not "3 things" but rather one big mush of one statement = the Democrats ARENT LEFTIST ENOUGH

    Which is completely retarded.

    Thankfully.

  • Alien Invader||

    While the current issue at hand is not a malicious power grab...

    Wow. You started out good and then you had to pull this stunt. Now you've got a whole shit-load of explaining to do.

    Just for starters, you'll have to tell us what was really going on when they rammed this monstrosity through congress. Is that something you can explain with an opinion poll?

  • BuSab Agent||

    A lot of people voted for Carter too, but good luck finding any one to fess up to that now.

  • GILMORE||

    Was he the white one? I mighta voted for him.

  • XM||

    OMG, when did Peter Suderamn change his name to Emily Ekins?

  • ||

    Have you seen pictures of Emily? Definitely not Peter.

  • Sevo||

    Click on the name up there at the top; DEFINITELY not Peter.

  • XM||

    I was kidding.

  • SusanM||

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fz44_Sp0K8A

    Obamacare's administrative anthem

  • OneOut||

    Agreed. He had to have some credibility to have had it ruined by O'care.

  • kenezen||

    And yet, He is not rebuffed or calmed. The President moves forward making changes in Law while ignoring Constitutional requirements of referring the law back to the legislature for the second time regarding ObamaCare. His Executive Orders border on the same obfuscation without challenge. Do we have an articulate politician that will take on the duty of challenging these violations. I see no one Champion that will legally and verbally challenge these obvious paths to exclusive Executive power.
    Reviewing his latest Executive orders, they clearly breach the space between allowed law and over-reach. Yet again we see no coordinated legal or political action. Do we have to see a State of Emergency or an Executive Order dismissing the Senate and House? approximately 12 generals and Admirals have left in the 5 year tenure. That's far more than the norm. In some Global Societies that's referred to as "Coup Protection."

  • GILMORE||

    "credi"-whatnow?

    never heard of it.

  • GILMORE||

    Imagine this debate with a proggy =

    You get sick - you find a doctor in the yellow pages, you pay $100 and you get well. $70 is spent on your care, and the doctor makes $30 in profit.

    You get sick - you go to your government-mandated doctor, you pay $120 and you get well. $50 is spent on your care, the doctor makes $10 profit, and $60 goes to the government system of doctor mandating services regulatory authority which makes sure doctors follow rules and fill out the right forms.

    Which is a 'better' system?

    Proggies will genuinely argue that the latter is preferred *because less 'profit' is made*.

    They may come up with other reasons , none of which are part of the thought experiment (like so many "what ifs"), but when forced to address the stated differences, they will genuinely believe that *reduced profits* make for a better society.

    they will also, less surprisingly, characterize the first example as "anarchy!"

    When you parse progressives garbled thinking, ultimately the thing they *really* want to get rid of is profit motive.

    I've found that by getting them to admit it *to themselves*, it starts to crack up the foundations of their cushy views. because they don't *think of themselves* as deluded socialists... its just that they casually endorse deluded socialist ideas because they are fundamentally intellectually lazy. Telling them so never works, but letting them discover it themselves can work wonders.

    Just a thought.

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