After the Storm

How Joplin, Missouri, rebuilt following a devastating tornado by circumventing bureaucracy.

On May 22, 2011, a tornado ripped through the town of Joplin, Missouri. The multi-vortex storm cut an eerily straight west-east line through Joplin’s downtown street grid, growing to three quarters of a mile wide at its peak. In the end, the Category 5 twister physically picked up and slammed down about one-quarter of the town, creating 3 million cubic yards of debris. It flattened big-box stores such as Home Depot and Walmart and left a desert of concrete foundation slabs covering a six-mile stretch of destruction. The storm killed 161 people, displaced 9,000 more, and completely wiped out more than 4,000 structures while damaging another 3,000. It was the deadliest tornado since modern recordkeeping began in 1950, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

But as the one-year anniversary of the storm approached, Joplin found itself in startlingly good shape. Local officials estimate that insurance claims will total $2 billion, yet the town’s business tax revenues are actually up for the year. School enrollment is 95 percent of what it was before the tornado, and the vast majority of displaced residents have secured lodging in or near the area.

Joplin’s recovery contrasts with the fitful, fraught response to the destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans, 700 miles to the south, in 2005. The two storms, like the two cities, were different in nature and scale. But there were also disparities in the official and unofficial responses after the initial damage. While the people of Joplin largely took matters into their own hands, pushing aside burdensome rules and refusing help when it came with too many strings attached, New Orleans and the surrounding area to this day remains hamstrung by federal, state, and local bureaucracy. Joplin’s experience offers a powerful lesson in self-sufficiency and knowing when to say “no thanks” to government. 

‘This Isn’t the FEMA of Katrina’

When I flew to Joplin in the fall of 2011 on one of the two daily flights serving the city, residents were still struggling to fathom their losses. But they were certain about one thing. Over and over, locals told me, “This isn’t the FEMA of Katrina.” Which was good, because after Hurricane Katrina the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) stalled the recovery and rebuilding for millions of Gulf Coast residents. In the months and years after the hurricane and resulting floods, media outlets, congressional investigations, and government reports excoriated the agency for its inept response. Indecision at local, state, and federal levels of government, as well as rigid regulations concerning everything from occupational licensing to debris removal, delayed or hindered Gulf Coast rebuilding efforts. FEMA’s own internal investigation admitted that the “widespread criticism for a slow and ineffective response” was well deserved. 

One reason the FEMA of 2011 did not perform like the FEMA of 2005 was that Joplin residents were determined not to let that happen. Founded by lead and zinc miners in the 19th century, this small southwestern Missouri town has a long history of self-reliance in a state that ranks fifth in overall freedom from burdensome government regulations, according to a 2011 study by the free market Mercatus Center (which sponsored my trip to Joplin as part of a broader tornado recovery research project for which I handled logistics). The community has the close-knit feel you’d expect of a small Midwestern town, with a network of active voluntary organizations and church groups that collaborate regularly. And as Beloit College economist Emily Chamlee-Wright concluded after leading more than 400 interviews with Katrina survivors, the best approach once emergency gives way to recovery is to reduce government involvement and devolve power to disaster victims, who know their own situations best. “In order to minimize signal noise that inhibits the response from markets and civil society,” Chamlee-Wright writes in her 2010 book The Cultural and Political Economy of Recovery, “government at all levels should scale back its efforts as soon as possible to make room for markets and voluntary organizations to provide basic supplies, food, clean-up, and construction services.”

Despite its small size, Joplin, home of St. John’s Regional Medical Center and battery manufacturer Eagle­Picher, is a regional hub for commerce, providing jobs and connections to residents of nearby Arkansas, Oklahoma, and Kansas. “Joplin’s a town of 50,000 people at night but a city of a quarter-million during the day,” goes the local refrain. The recovery benefited from these trade routes. After the tornado, emergency response teams from around the state streamed into town. Four hundred and thirty police, fire, and public works departments helped with search and rescue, cleanup, and debris removal. Doctors and nurses, many of whom worked at one of Joplin’s two hospitals or in the medical services sector clustered around them, came from around the four-state area. A handful of warehouses around the city are full to this day with donated material such as tarps, clothing, and food.

Most displaced people found refuge with nearby family or friends; the city estimates that 95 percent of people displaced by the storm stayed within 25 miles of town. “A lot of the residents are staying here,” Assistant City Manager Sam Anselm tells me. It’s “a testament to the spirit, the way the community responded to this.” 

The city registered 130,000 volunteers from around the country and estimates that at least that many helped and weren’t counted. One even came from Japan and stayed two weeks, citing the way Americans donated to his country after the earthquake and tsunami of March 2011. (Someone found the Japanese volunteer a bicycle that he rode 12 miles each day to and from his cleanup site.) In October, ABC’s Extreme Makeover: Home Edition rolled into town and built seven homes in seven days. Habitat for Humanity built 10 the next month.

The tornado sucked nine-story St. John’s a few inches off its foundation before setting it back down. The medical center erected temporary structures in open space next door, complete with an emergency room, and managed to keep nearly all of its 2,200 employees on payroll. Along with medical jobs, Joplin is home to a handful of big businesses, such as building materials company TAMKO, a PotashCorp animal feed plant, and a General Mills factory. 

Joplin Schools Superintendent C.J. Huff didn’t want what he dubbed the “Hurricane Katrina effect” of people fleeing the area permanently, so the school district established a program for volunteers to “adopt” students and provide them with school supplies. Private donations poured in; the United Arab Emirates gave $1 million, enough to issue a MacBook to every high school student. TAMKO donated $500,000. Other sources, from Lions Club International to singer Sheryl Crow (who auctioned off a Mercedes) to a 9-year-old Nevadan who raised $360 with a car wash, combined to contribute $3.5 million of private money to the district by September 2011.

‘Better to Ask Forgiveness Than Permission’

Two days after the tornado, when 4,200 kids had nowhere to go to school, Superintendent Huff stood up at a staff meeting and said, “We’re going to start school in 84 days.” On August 17, they did just that. The tornado had destroyed the town’s only public high school and 50 percent of the school district’s property, inflicting $150 million worth of damage. When school re-opened as scheduled in the fall, enrollment hit 95 percent.

How did they do it? “Sometimes,” Huff explains, “it’s better to ask for forgiveness than permission.” A day after the storm, once Huff had canceled the remainder of the school year, the Joplin school board granted him emergency authority to circumvent usual bureaucratic procedures in order to deal directly with the disaster. “We knew that to keep things moving at a rapid pace, we needed to give our superintendent authority to make decisions as quickly as possible,” says Joplin Board of Education President Ashley Micklethwaite. “The worst thing we can do as a board is get down into the weeds and worry about minute details. We had to look at the big picture, and the big picture was getting our schools back up and running.”

Huff’s new powers included the ability to make emergency procurement decisions instead of, for example, adhering to a mandatory two-week minimum for posting bids. The superintendent also successfully lobbied Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, who signed a handful of executive orders granting the district emergency permission to speed up the contracting process faster than state regulations usually allow. Huff gathered a team of architects and contractors he had used for previous district jobs and began planning temporary construction for the approaching school year. Within a few days, he says, they were able to choose which subcontractors and building materials to use, a process that would normally take up to one month. City Hall also responded to the needs of the school district and its builders, agreeing to receive and approve plans and blueprints piecemeal rather than requiring the usual single master set. A process that would typically take months took only a few weeks. 

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  • Fist of Etiquette||

    In the months and years after the hurricane and resulting floods, media outlets, congressional investigations, and government reports excoriated the agency for its inept response.

    FEMA writes checks. I don't know what else people expect from it.

  • BakedPenguin||

    The government magic they so believe in.

  • fish||

    I'm sure that reason.coms favorite gay Oklahoman is unable to achieve a firm erection due to the rampant govhate detailed in this article.

  • anon||

    We have a government of laws, not men.

    I very much disagree.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    I wonder if Joplin will be punished for its bureaucratic non-compliance.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    OT but dig the irony:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/.....f=politics

    "No way! Only Teapublicant's are crooked!"

    snicker.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    Wow... an almost-entirely sensible post on HuffPo??

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/.....f=politics

    I am surprise.

  • General Butt Naked||

    Not so fast, skippy:

    Worried about the deficit? That's why God created the possibility of 75% tax rates on the highest earners (15% less than during the Eisenhower years -- last I looked, a Republican administration). You can milk 98 percent of the people of their incomes and savings after a year, in misbegotten efforts to bring down the deficit created because so many of those middle and working class people got laid off because of the greed of the .01%, or you can create tax brackets that break at half a million, a million, 5 million, 10 million, and above 10 million, and have a tax code that is fair, progressive, and wildly popular. And impose a 75% tax on incomes above, say, 10 million, and CEOs might decide that, instead of giving themselves that extra 15 million dollar bonus, they'll keep their 5 million dollar salary and just 5 million of that bonus (because now they're only going to get 25% of it) and give $2000 each to each of their 5000 employees, who helped earn them that bonus and won't be taxed at 75 percent.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    I said there were sensible parts, not the whole.

  • ||

    and wildly popular.

    Gee, a tax code that puts the bulk of the burden on a tiny minority is wildly popular? Go figure.

  • wareagle||

    four out of five people surveyed agreed that higher taxes on the fifth was a good idea. Or something like that.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    That's everyday stuff from the wealth-enviers. Team Blue has brainwashed them well over the decades.

  • UneasyRider||

    Three wolves and a sheep voting on dinner.

  • DJF||

    This person wants to dishonor poor people and kick them out of civilized society.

    After all don’t they say that its an honor to pay taxes and its what we pay to live in civilized society so by raising the tax rate to 75% on rich people its giving all that honor and civilizing to rich people and once again the poor are left without honor or civilization..

  • Rasilio||

    ROTFL apparently the author doesn't think through what he is saying.

    If the CEO's are so self absorbed that they want that money no matter what they will simply convert some of their salary into stock grants or options and then they don't have to pay the tax on it until it is advantageous to them (ie their portfolio took a hit this year so time to cash in some of the stock options to offset it leaving them revenue neutral and therefore having no tax burden).

    Even if that doesn't work, who is to say that the money doesn't get doled out to the 500 stockholders in the form of a dividend, there is little to no guarantee that such a tax system would result in the megabucks salary of executives being diverted into the salaries of the individual employees.

    Oh I should also point out that there are not very many companies with only 5000 employees paying their CEO's $20 million a year, a few maybe, especially in the financial services field but when you start talking about multi tens of million dollars in salary and bonuses you're pretty much talking Fortune 500 companies most of whom have 10's of thousands of employees.

  • #||

    And the economics of this doesn't even make sense. Restricting CEO pay does not translate into paying workers more. The productivity of the worker has not changed, so therefor the demand for labor has not changed. All this would do, other than making it harder to attract top executive talent, would be higher retained earnings for the company. I suppose if pretty much every company did this, maybe competitive forces drive prices of goods down a little bit, but either way workers aren't going to be payed more.

  • mr simple||

    The other problem with specific numbers is that they take people into their heads and away from their guts, which they respond to appeals to values like fairness. You don't want them engaged in internal debate about the validity of your numbers

    Yeah, we don't want people thinking, we need them feeling. That's when they vote democrat.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    Okay, after re-reading, there was just a smidgen of sensibility in the article.

    Guess that's what got my hopes up.

    I need to drink more coffee. Or just drink more, in general.

  • Heroic Mulatto||

  • Mr. FIFY||

    Money shot:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/.....61017.html

    Maher is "blacker" than Wayne Brady? The hell you say.

  • KDN||

    White people like Wayne Brady because he make Bryant Gumbel look like Malcolm X.

    Wayne Brady's gonna have to choke a bitch.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    And John Ashcroft makes Billy Graham look like Freddie Mercury.

    /HT Dennis Miller

  • Juice||

  • Rich||

    knowing when to say “no thanks” to government.

    Enjoy that while you can. Government is increasingly able to make us "an offer we can't refuse".

  • ||

    I was in Joplin about 3 weeks after the tornado. It was certainly a sight to see.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    I was there a couple of days after Christmas last year. It's bizarre to see new, shiny buildings next to or across the street from piles of rubble.

    The original snaps and video, I shut out after a few seconds of viewing. I simply could not take the devastation without feeling ill. It was that bad.

    Living fairly close (Springfield is about sixty miles away), it hit close to home. Talking to people who survived was painful; some lost everything they had minus what they had on them at the moment. Way sad.

    It was heartening to see that there was so much help, not all the volunteers could get in TO help at the same time. Shows how generous people are, despite what leftists say.

  • ||

    Shows how generous people are, despite what leftists say.

    Are you sure that those "volunteers" weren't being forced to help? After all, extracting tax money from the citizenry is The Only Way™ to assist certain programs or groups.

  • BakedPenguin||

    People are plenty generous when it's obvious that people are suffering through no fault of their own. The generosity decreases as the fault issue becomes less clear. That's what leftists have a problem with.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    I've talked to a lot of people who helped, either by physically going to Joplin or just gathering donations and taking them down there.

    None of them reported any guns to their heads, thankfully.

    But it is conceivable.

  • Solanum||

    Tornado kittah rescue mission?

  • wareagle||

    Joplin’s recovery contrasts with the fitful, fraught response to the destruction wrought by Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans

    this is not a contrast in FEMA ability or in bureaucracy/red tape or in much of anything beyond local mentality. NOLA has a large dependency society, folks who were not even willing to hop of their roofs and get to shallower water after Katrina, and it had a mayor who did his best to ensure that no local resource would be marshaled. The attitude was very much "someone else will take care of it."

    Contrast to Joplin where the sentiment was "we better get to work" and whatever outside help arrived would be added to existing efforts. Not a community accustomed to handouts, surrounded by other towns also not accustomed, so a lot of them did what folks have done for centuries - help your neighbor when he is in bad shape.

  • Mr. FIFY||

    Same thing happened during the ice storms of a few years ago. Total strangers helping other total strangers.

    Voluntarily.

    The worst nightmare of leftists.

  • ||

    Each time I see stories like this - where people take matters into their hands - I wonder what goes through the mind of a hard-core leftists who basically exist to live vicariously through the state.

    I can just picture people like Tony screaming, "it's not supposed to go down this way! People stop picking up those boxes! The government in all its compassionate glory will do THAT! Argghhhhh!"

  • Rhino||

    Exactly. THIS is the generosity and charity that we need. Not government programs that supposedly help the poor or misfortunate through force unto others. Free people helping each other on their own free will is much more effective.

  • ||

    Since no one is willing to ask, I will.

    New Orleans is mostly black. Correct? They sat waiting while their faux-leaders played ignorant politics. Correct? They waited for someone to come and pluck them out of their misery even though some had been forewarned in advanced?

    And when that didn't pan out they called "racist!" Correct?

    There's your mindset problem.

    Contrast to Joplin...

  • ||

    Partly, it's just how we roll in the "heartland".

    The other part is what leftists always ignore.....human nature. Humans are hardwired for empathy. They are also hardwired for reciprocity.

    I have spent an entire weekend helping a neighbor with a project, because I KNOW (or at least I'm pretty sure) that he would do the same for me.

    I also know that if he DOESN'T return the favor when I need it, it's the last time he's getting shit from me.

    It's called justice.

  • Concerned Citizen||

    Or contrast to Nashville, TN flood of 2010.

  • ||

    cial and unofficial responses after the http://www.ceinturesfr.com/cei.....-c-17.html initial damage. While the people of Joplin largely took matters into their own hands, pushing aside burdensome rules and refusin

  • tee shirt pas cher||

    Print|Email|Single Page
    After the Storm
    How Joplin, Missouri, rebuilt following a devastating tornado by circumventing bureaucracy.

    Tate Watkins from the August/September 2012 issue

    On May 22, 2011, a tornado ripped through the town of Joplin, Missouri. The multi-vortex storm cut an eerily straight west-east line through Joplin’s downtown street grid, growing to three quarters of a mile wide at its peak. In the end, the Category 5 twister physically picked up and slammed down about one-quarter of the town, creating 3 million cubic yards of debris. It flattened big-box stores such as Home Depot and Walmart and left a desert of concrete foundation slabs covering a six-mile stretch of destruction. The storm killed 161 people, displaced 9,000 more, and completely wiped out more than 4,000 structures while damaging another 3,000. It was the deadliest tornado since modern recordkeeping began in 1950, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

    But as the one-year anniversary of the storm approached, Joplin found itself in startlingly good shape. Local officials estimate that insurance claims will total $2 billion, yet the town’s business tax revenues are actually up for the year. School enrollment is 95 percent of what it was before the tornado, and the vast majority of displaced residents have secured lodging in or near the area.

  • KatieW||

    Oh the irony...

    When most midwestern towns were created, settlers didn't give a second thought to whether those on the Hill (whether federal or state) would give them the stamp of approval. The primary difference of course being that the federal government NEEDED its citizens in order to justify their existence. Sadly, it seems as though the opposite is now true.

    When citizens feel that they must ask government for permission, assistance or acceptance to carry out the most basic behaviors, clearly government is a society of laws and not men.

  • شات عراقنا||

    thank you

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