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A Father Defends His Daughter with a Shotgun When Cops Break Into the Wrong House

"You got the wrong address. Don't shoot my daughter."

|||DAVID TULIS/UPI/NewscomDAVID TULIS/UPI/NewscomWhen men attempted to enter a father's house in Prince George's County, Maryland, he made a quick choice to protect his daughter inside. He told his daughter to get to the back of the house, he picked up a shotgun, and he fired while the men used a device to open the door. He hit one of the intruders in the hand and another in the shoulder. One of the cops outside returned fire, but the bullet missed the father.

It wasn't until the door was fully opened that he realized they were police officers. He dropped his gun and pleaded, "You got the wrong address. Don't shoot my daughter."

Prince George's County Police Chief Hank Stawinski has since explained that the officers were attempting to serve a warrant after a police informant told them that a drug dealer lived in the home. As it turned out, the informant had given them bad information. The department concluded that the father, who Stawinski called a "law-abiding, hard-working citizen," was not aware that the men on the other side of his door were police officers. The department will not be pressing charges against him, and it is conducting a review to prevent a similar situation from happening again.

Just a few weeks prior, Dallas Police Officer Amber Guyger shot and killed Botham Jean after saying she mistook his apartment for her own. As the full story of how or why such a mistake was made is still under review, several have wondered if the fateful night would have played out differently had Jean shot Guyger. Dana Loesch, spokesperson for the National Rifle Association (NRA), observed that Jean may have been alive had he been a gun owner.

That's true: He might. On the other hand, there's a fair chance he would have died anyway, since the police may have shot him upon seeing a wounded officer. Earlier in the year, after a Colorado grandfather (and legal gun owner) shot and killed a home intruder, police mistook him for the invader. They killed him in the confusion, despite the state's 1985 Homeowners Protection Act, which recognizes Colorado homeowners' right to defend themselves with a gun. Even in the incident in Prince George's County, one officer returned fire.

And even if you survive the raid, not all police will be as willing as these Maryland cops to concede their error. Cory Maye of Mississippi was sentenced to death in 2004 after he shot an officer during a wrong-door drug raid. He too was protecting his little girl, and he too was unaware that the people bursting into his home at night were police. He eventually got out of prison, but not until 2011.

Photo Credit: DAVID TULIS/UPI/Newscom

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  • Microaggressor||

    Time for some common sense cop control.

  • MatthewSlyfield||

    I'll second that motion.

  • BigT||

    Shouldn't cops who break into the wrong house face charges?

  • Live Free Or Diet||

    B&E, brandishing, unjustified discharge of a firearm within 100 yards of a dwelling or road...

  • Oli||

    To be fair, the cops breaking down the door are probably not the ones who planned and approved the mission.

  • Arcxjo||

    You know who else was just following orders?

  • Res ipsa loquitur||

    Christina Ford and Senate Democrats ?

  • Oli||

    That's not a very fitting analogy.

  • Echospinner||

    Barney Fife?

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    Anyone working for me. At least if they want to keep their jobs.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    Of course, my orders involve financial paperwork, maybe some property renovations, and definitely not putting a cap in some homeowner's ass.

  • Earth Skeptic||

    You obviously don't run a government agency.

  • Gasman||

    If they had some skin in the game, they would not just be automatons, breaking in every door that they are told to.
    Nobody was going to suffer any lasting injury if the cops took the time for due diligence. This was not a hostage situation, but simple drug possession. Take some time to observe the place; an old fashioned stake out is time consuming, so a few $40 game cameras would sufficiently document who was coming and going from the premises.
    Taking some time to gain some knowledge of the situation is not nearly as sexy as a no knock door busting raid. But at the end of the day, everyone gets to go home alive.

  • Gasman||

    If they had some skin in the game, they would not just be automatons, breaking in every door that they are told to.
    Nobody was going to suffer any lasting injury if the cops took the time for due diligence. This was not a hostage situation, but simple drug possession. Take some time to observe the place; an old fashioned stake out is time consuming, so a few $40 game cameras would sufficiently document who was coming and going from the premises.
    Taking some time to gain some knowledge of the situation is not nearly as sexy as a no knock door busting raid. But at the end of the day, everyone gets to go home alive.

  • Al Bendova||

    That's ridiculous Gasman. How the hell we gonna ever get to use our cool tactical gear? I mean, the chances of EVER getting to shoot a perp and/or their dog really go down when you take your time to assess the real situation.

  • JeffreyL||

    End qualified immunity and this might actually happen.

  • Sonny Bono's Ghost||

    Yes, and so should the judge that signed that bullshit warrant.

  • Zeb||

    Wow. That guy was lucky. I'm fairly amazed that he's not charged with something. Of course he shouldn't be. If people are trying to bust down your door, you get to shoot them.

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    Yes, it brings me immense joy to hear that he is okay. I hope that the cops hand hurts like a motherfucker, but I'm glad nobody died at all here.

  • perlchpr||

    The department will not be pressing charges against him

    Will miracles please never cease. No sarc.

  • perlchpr||

    I'm fairly amazed that he's not charged with something.

    This. On top of "I'm amazed he didn't get shot."

  • Juice||

    I'm fairly amazed that he's not charged with something.

    In Maryland, no less.

  • GoatOnABoat||

    Kudos to the police for acknowledging their error and not charging the good citizen, but it raises the troubling question of how a warrant to break and enter can be obtained based solely on the information from a so-called "informant."

  • Zeb||

    Seems like maybe the informant should face some kind of charge when his wrong and likely made up information puts innocent people at risk.

  • ||

    It'd probably be good if whomever's supposed to judge the validity of an informant's statements and issue warrants accordingly faced some consequences as well.

  • Zeb||

    Yes, that too. The whole informant thing (especially when the informants are imprisoned or facing charges) is just rife with perverse incentives.

  • SIV||

    And the Judge for issuing the warrant and the cops for not confirming it before launching an armed home invasion...

    The police chief's response is a pleasant surprise. Perhaps the home invaders were contrite despite being shot.

  • CatoTheChipper||

    ^THIS.

    For it to provide anything resembling a protection of individual rights of life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness, due process of law requires that a judge be something more than a monkey with a rubber stamp.

    Unfortunately, that often seems to be the case. FISC judges reject just 0.3% of warrant applications. That rate was unacceptable after 9/11, so the Patriot Act bypassed the warrant requirement with the new-fangled surveillance letter. In Utah, the median time between application for a search warrant and its approval is under three minutes. Just 2% of warrant applications in Utah are rejected.

  • Ben of Houston||

    Well, in defense of the approval rate, most search warrants are quite simple. Reasonable cause isn't a very high bar, and police don't ask stupid questions for warrants that aren't going to be approved. They might even be punished if they routinely waste the judge's time by proposing bad searches.

    A no-knock warrant is a completely different situation and requires an entirely different level of scrutiny. Whatever they are doing, it is clearly insufficient.

  • D-Pizzle||

    It's "probable cause," not "reasonable cause." You may be confusing this with "reasonable suspicion," which is what is required for a so-called Terry stop (brief detention for questioning that may be accompanied by a weapons patdown). Probable cause is a significantly higher standard to meet, and the word of some scumbag independent of corroborating evidence is not sufficient evidence unless the informant has a history of reliability regarding the information provided. For a no-knock, the warrant need only be for drugs because of the ease with which they can be disposed of.

  • Troglodyte Rex||

    They don't hire cops that are intelligent...and the SCOTUS upheld that practice.

  • LarryStone||

    Even the bible says you need two witnesses to the crime. A single person, the informant, who is being a rat in order t o stay out of jail is not credible at all. Where is the second witness? Where is the POS judge who signed off on such flimsy evidence -- the word from a snitch?

  • Conchfritters||

    Fuck, my 7 year old daughter could do that job. Sign every paper that is put in front of you?

  • perlchpr||

    I think my buddy's three year old could probably do it, if you let him use the fat crayons and gave him time.

  • Duke of url||

    When a magistrate carefully considers a warrant application, the court is only concerned with a narrow scope of legally relevant information;
    1) Is this my address?
    2) Is this the address of a friend, family, or campaign contributer?
    3) Is my 'approved' rubber stamp, worn excessively from so much use?

    If the answer is 'no' to this rigorous standard, a armed home invasion robbery kid napping may only then, lawfully commence.

  • D-Pizzle||

    Sadly, not only will the informant not be charged with something, but the police will probably rely on this informant again as the basis for another otherwise baseless search warrant.

  • Imperator||

    Kudos to the police for not being corrupt.

  • Hugh Akston||

    The department concluded that the father, who Stawinski called a "law-abiding, hard-working citizen," was not aware that the men on the other side of his door were police officers.

    Which is odd since the officers knocked on the door and clearly identified themselves as such several times before forcing it open, right?

  • Wizard4169||

    Your world sounds nice. Can I come live there?

  • Naaman Brown||

    Cynical me thinks it is more common to have a pro farma light knock-knock, whispered "Officer with a warrant. Open up." one-Mississippi two-Mississippi "I hear a furtive movement. Break it down before they can flush the contraband."

  • Naaman Brown||

    ... a pro forma ...

    Sigh. An edit option would be nice.

  • Harvey Mosley||

    It would be nice. But not as entertaining.

  • Jerryskids||

    You need to start at the top with this sort of shit, and the top is the judge who signed a no-knock warrant based on the sworn testimony of a cop that "some guy" said there was a drug dealer at this address. Unless the suspect's known to be armed and dangerous, there's no need for a no-knock raid and unless the cops cough up the name and track record of the informant there's no probable cause for a warrant at all. In this case, the informant is obviously unreliable and if you don't even know who's living in the house you sure as hell don't know they're armed and dangerous. The cops will cut every corner they can, it's the prosecutor's and the judge's job to keep them honest.

  • Microaggressor||

    there's no need for a no-knock raid

    But announcing themselves would give the perps time to flush all the contraband down the toilet. We can't let dope fiends get off that easily. You gotta break a few eggs to make a drug-free utopia.

  • Bronze Khopesh||

    How many eggs are we up to now?

  • Hugh Akston||

    I'm willing to bet we're past world's largest omelette territory. Somebody get Guinness on the phone.

  • Wizard4169||

    A mere 145k eggs? Pretty sure we have more "eggs" than that rotting in prison right now. Plus, there's still no damn omelet.

  • ||

    But announcing themselves would give the perps time to flush all the contraband down the toilet.

    And everybody knows that it's a black hole that sits beneath every toilet waiting to mangle not just the matter but even information about the matter into an unintelligible blast of static.

  • DPICM||

    You know, this "they'll flush it all down the toilet" thing has always been the excuse. So why, before a raid, don't the cops just cut the water to the house?

    Then you can catch them with the evidence, and charge them with trying to tamper with or destroy it.

  • Zeb||

    You still get one flush when the water is off.

  • ||

    You still get one flush when the water is off.

    They could toss the drugs into the furnace or an incinerator too. The toilet is just an excused. How do I put this politely? Part of the reason *some* restrooms ask that you not flush things down the toilet is because those things can still be found in the sewage line *months* later.

  • MatthewSlyfield||

    loose powder or water soluble pills would be a bit harder to recover.

  • JoeB||

    Plumbers cost money.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    Furnaces don't workaround that quickly, and I'm not sure it would be successful. And who the hell has an incinerator in their residence?

  • Don't look at me.||

    If you can make them flush the drugs just by knocking on the door, wouldn't it be easier to just knock on all doors so everyone would flush their drugs and we could have the drug free utopia without shooting anyone or sending anyone to jail?

  • Merl3noir||

    They seem to have screwed up the No-knock raid as well, since he was able to get his daughter into hiding and get his shot gun out and fire a shot at the officers before they got in. Generally on a No-Knock warrant, there is a loud bang as the door is rammed open, and the hose is flooded by Police.

  • Gasman||

    Sounds like a market opportunity for a plumbing company specializing is threading lines back up the plumbing of the dwelling, and blocking the soil line.
    Now cops knock, toilet flushes, collect evidence from overflowing toilet.

  • clarkcountycriminalcops||

    Cops shouldn't be raiding homes for an amount of drugs so small it can be easily flushed down the toilet.

  • markm23||

    This! They'll claim they are going after drug kingpins - with tiny amounts of drugs...

  • Hugh Akston||

    it's the prosecutor's and the judge's job to keep them honest.

    Oh, you.

  • perlchpr||

    Unless the suspect's known to be armed and dangerous

    I beg your pardon, but, politely, fuck that noise. Selling drugs shouldn't be any more illegal than selling candy. Fuck the entire drug war right in the ear, and the only time "no knock" warrants should be approved should be for actual violent criminals guilty of performing some violent act, not just some weed slinger with a Glock.

  • Wizard4169||

    According to the linked article, the cops supposedly knocked on the door, but the people inside didn't hear anything until the cops started trying to break in. So maybe they lied about the knocking part, or maybe they did knock but then immediately started breaking in instead of waiting for a response. (Hey, what's the point of dressing up in all your tacticool gear if you don't even get to bust some shit up?)

    On a side note, even even if a suspect is believed to be armed and dangerous, busting the door down with no warning seems like a really good way to get shot. I don't commit a lot of crimes (Given the current state of the legal code, I'm not sure it's possible to get through a day without committing any.), but anybody breaking into my house at zero-dark-thirty can look forward to discussing the matter with my friend Mr. Mossy 590.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    And even if you survive the raid, not all police will be as willing as these Maryland cops to concede their error.

    Indeed. This is extraordinary. The normal way they think they can prevent further officer casualty is to ramp up the force to whatever the setting is above overwhelming. They were serving a fucking piece of paper, for fuck sake. A piece of paper that, it turned out, wasn't worth the, uh, paper it was written on.

  • perlchpr||

    Dude. This isn't just extraordinary, this is damn near unprecedented. This is like the Black Swan of police raids.

  • Bronze Khopesh||

    Get rid of the war on rugs and this sort of thing goes away.

  • Bronze Khopesh||

    drugs not rugs

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    But the war on drugs really ties the statism together.

  • Griffin3||

    You win 3.5 internet.

  • Rockabilly||

    Dude, is that you?

    Where's my bong?

  • DrZ||

    Bugs not drugs! The darn bugs will eat the dope plants if they aren't controlled.

  • Anacreon||

    Beware of unintended consequences: a WAR ON RUGS might play havoc with Trump's hairdo.

  • dangfitz||

    I'm going to go out on a limb here, and guess that the father at least looked like he was of European ancestry. I haven't seen any pictures, but he's alive and uncharged after shooting a cop.

    2nd point: How on earth was a "no-knock" warrant obtained for a dynamic entry like this? Who was the idiot judge who signed off on it?

  • ipsquire||

    Odds are about 25% that you're right. PG County is quite diverse.

  • Juice||

    It's District Heights. There's no way in hell he's white.

  • Juice||

    If by diverse you mean 90+% black.

  • dangfitz||

    I'm going to go out on a limb here, and guess that the father at least looked like he was of European ancestry. I haven't seen any pictures, but he's alive and uncharged after shooting a cop.

    2nd point: How on earth was a "no-knock" warrant obtained for a dynamic entry like this? Who was the idiot judge who signed off on it?

  • Wizard4169||

    Squirrels don't need no stinkin' warrants!
    Also, I don't think it was a no-knock warrant. According to the linked article, the cops supposedly knocked before they started trying to break in. But as for obtaining a no-knock warrant, it's ridiculously easy in too many jurisdictions. The suspect has a dog that might warn them of approaching strangers? No-knock it is!

  • D-Pizzle||

    "The suspect has a dog that might warn them of approaching strangers? No-knock it is!"

    A soon to be dead dog.

  • Juice||

    I'm going to go out on a limb here, and guess that the father at least looked like he was of European ancestry.

    Those types don't stay long in District Heights if they want to live.

  • josh||

    I think I actually read that one of the police spokesmen said he showed as much concern for the police as he did his daughter.

    It's cute that they think they're on the same level as kin when they got the wrong damn house.

  • majil||

    Too bad he did not kill the cock suckers

  • DiegoF||

    I checked the link and yep, an NRA spokesman really said that about Jean and Guyger! I have to say I am stupendously impressed. These were local cops, whereas NRA and those types usually only find their testicles when the back of an LEO's jacket reads "ATF," whereupon they puff out their chests and start sounding like Ice-T; otherwise they drop to their knees and kiss their shiny black boots lovingly all over.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    "A law-abiding, hard-working citizen and his daughter were home at the point where we began to execute that search warrant," Stawinski said.

    White.

    Despite the silence, the team had a feeling someone might be inside the apartment, so they used a device to open the door, according to police.

    The same feeling that got them the warrant in the first place? One out of two ain't bad.

    Another officer returned fire, but no one was hit.

    "Special operations team."

    It seems likely that the only reason this guy isn't getting charged is because bodycam footage shows the police did not, in fact, announce themselves.

  • Wizard4169||

    I especially like how they used a "device" to open the door. Just what kind of device? A crowbar? A sledgehammer? A Swiss Army knife?

    Also, I'm amazed that only one cop fired. I really would have expected every one of them not holding a "device" to dump their mags into the poor SOB.

  • Rock Lobster||

    "... to dump their mags into the poor SOB."

    That is properly phrased as, "Procedures were followed."

  • Magnitogorsk||

    Hopefully a judge will issue a warrant soon to search the home for small amounts of marijuana to determine if the officers erred by not immediately executing him

  • versingcross867||

    Cops and the police state that they represent are not necessary to humanity and both should be abolished.

  • Rockabilly||

    #FuckTheFuckingWarOnDrugs!!!!!!

  • perlchpr||

    ++

  • ||

    Why do we have officers of the law who can't seem to understand the fucking law? The right to defend my home is against anyone. Knock and ask me to come out or back the fuck off if I act defensively in any manner. Shooting an innocent person in their home is murder, especially for an agent of the state.

    That the state continually violates this principal without consequences, i.e., the poor fucker who got SWATed, shows the federal and state constitutions do not limit the government as intended. The home should be inviolable to the state. Always. Period.

    True story, just 2 months ago i watched an armed standoff take place 3 doors down. My neighbor has a picture of a god-damned camouflaged sniper in his yard. They wouldnt go in until they sent a robot and a dog and then broke every window in the house to gas the shit out of man who was dead before they arrived.

    Cops are not heroes. A hero would have walked in the front door and risked a confrontation. Instead they destroyed the home of a woman and her 3 kids. They did give her the number of an outfit that cleans up toxic crimescenes when they left.

  • Hank Phillips||

    First Responders™ as objects of dedication in the Republican Party Platform are elevated to a sort of Papal Infallibility, so the home and castle defender by their rights ought to have been gunned down like a dog--especially once the danger of possibly Satanic plant leaves, or Assassins of Youth, was hypothesized. But since this episode did not turn out as Harry Anslinger intended, my question is: did the innocent home and castle defender get a paid vacation for his trouble?

  • jagjr||

    can it really have escaped your notice that the Democrat Party is just as guilty of the hero worship?? in some cases they are worse, as the progressive wing of the party continues to take over, because questioning the motives, ability, expertise, or good intentions of any government official is simply verboten, no matter how agenda driven, incompetent, abusive, or maligant.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    Hank is a fucking idiot. He's obsessed with the "gee oh pee" (he actually thinks that's clever), and spouting shit about 1932.

  • Jerry B.||

    Another victory in the War on Drugs, except is wasn't.

  • Rich||

    As it turned out, the informant had given them bad information.

    But it was *credible* information!

  • Rock Lobster||

    Perhaps the informant has tits. If so, she Must Be Believed.

  • Don't look at me.||

    It's the vagina that determines the level of truth, not the tits. Cuz you can have tits and still have a penis, and everyone knows you cannot be trusted if you have a penis.

  • Rock Lobster||

    Ah, but if you are a woman with a penis who identifies as a woman, this means you are a woman.

    (Checks latest updates of *Progressive Hierarchy of Victimhood* for confirmation)... And therefore, you are constitutionally incapable of lying about anything ever, because She Must Be Believed!

    Obviously.

    See? That was easy.

  • Don't look at me.||

    ( searching eBay for said instructional materials)

  • Flinch||

    So you reject doing the helicopter as a form of virtue signaling I assume.

  • LiborCon||

    The problem is that this:

    "The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized."

    Doesn't offer much protection when the "Oath or affirmation" is; some guy said so. And if some guy is full of shit and an innocent person dies? Good Faith Exception to the rescue!

  • kynodog||

    Same outfit that killed Cheye Calvos dogs in 2008 =>


    _________________

    "Prince George County Mayor's Dogs Killed in Drug Raid"


    Radley Balko|Jul. 31, 2008 9:21 am


    A Prince George's County, Maryland SWAT team raided the home of Berwyn Heights Mayor Cheye Calvo last night, shooting and killing his two black labs in the process.

    "My government blew through my doors and killed my dogs," Calvo said. "They thought we were drug dealers, and we were treated as such. I don't think they really ever considered that we weren't."


    http://reason.com/blog/2008/07.....n-drug-rai

  • Tamfang||

    Cory Maye isn't entirely free: he took a plea bargain (manslaughter, time served) to avoid waiting for a new trial, so on paper he's still a felon.

  • Jerry B.||

    I'd bet Chief Stawinski isn't going to get much love at the next Maryland Chiefs of Police Association get-together. You can't poke holes in the myth of infallibility without some backlash.

  • Rock Lobster||

    "... in Montana between the prison ranch and the state asylum for the insane"

    If this is how Montana refers to their bicameral legislature, more states could use such honesty.

  • Don't look at me.||

    I'm guessing you built there because the land was cheap?

  • Don't look at me.||

    I'm guessing you built there because the land was cheap?

  • Naaman Brown||

    In the Ken Ballew raid (June 1970, Silver Spring, Maryland), the police and ATFD raiding party justified dressing in street clothes (with a badge on their belt) because the apartment was in a high crime neighborhood and they did not want to be identified as police.

    At the civil trial when Ballew sued the government for damages, the government claimed the only reason Ballew had blocked the rear door of his apartment (which led to a utility corridor to the common laundry room) was to obstruct law enforcement in the lawful service of a search warrant. The federal judge agreed with the federal defense attorneys in dismissing Ballew's argument he blocked the rear door because his apartment was in a high crime neighborhood.

    The only reason a person living in a high crime neighborhood would want to secure their home against forced entry is because they want to obstruct law enforcement in the lawful service of search warrants. "... law enforcement considers such castle-like housing to be prima facie evidence of criminal activity ..." That point was settled almost half a century ago.

    ".. sturdy brick house with heavily reinforced door and window frames. The windows had metal shutters to close at night, the doors were double thick oak with two heavy draw bolts and a slip-in cross bar piece." Ballew merely had a sofa blocking the rear door.

  • yet another dave||

    ...."It wasn't until the door was fully opened that he realized they were police officers. He dropped his gun and pleaded, "You got the wrong address. Don't shoot my daughter."

    Is it just me, or does his statement, upon realizing it was police, begging them not to shoot his daughter, meant he accepted he was about to die in a hail of gunfire?

  • Don't look at me.||

    Yes.

  • jagjr||

    how is it "serving a warrant" to break down a door without even announcing that you are police officers?? anyone that thinks that is legit worries me. if you are serving legal paper, that's one thing. if you are trying to apprehend a dangerous criminal that's another. they are not the same, and do not overlap. just stop it.

  • Naaman Brown||

    This was a warrant service by the Special Operations Division of Prince George County PD, District Heights, Maryland.

    Locally in Tennessee we have had home invasions by criminals dressed as bail bondsman's bounty hunters.

    We have had criminals impersonating cops in other cases.

    For everyone's safety the over use of SWAT tactics needs to be toned down, especial cops acting like home invaders.

  • BillEverman||

    I think it also needs to be clear that the cop that got shot in the shoulder was also hit IN THE FACE, according to the linked article. It should be made clear to anyone busting down doors that if they are busting down the wrong door, an innocent homeowner might shoot you IN THE FACE.

  • buybuydandavis||

    "The department will not be pressing charges against him"

    That's shockingly sensible and just.

  • Earth Skeptic||

    There's something to be said in favor of spreading a million people over 150,000 square miles.

  • TxJack 112||

    Police are human beings and the one undeniable truth is human beings make mistakes. To hold police to some un attainable standard that they are never permitted to make a mistake is insane. What is more insane is being just like the MSM and jumping to conclusions based on second hand reports of limited information rather than waiting for all the facts.

  • Harvey Mosley||

    You know police make mistakes. I know police make mistakes. It seems the only people who don't know that police make mistakes are the police. If they did know this and were responsible about it their plans would include margins for error to help mitigate the effect those mistakes have on innocent people.

    That we still have innocent, unarmed people shot because they "were reaching for their waistband" or some other boilerplate nonsense shows us that:

    a) They don't take their mistakes into account

    b) They don't deserve the benefit of the doubt or get to play the "mistake" card when an innocent or non threatening person is killed.

  • clarkcountycriminalcops||

    The reason this incident is newsworthy isn't because cops made a mistake.

    The reason this incident is newsworthy is because the cops admitted their mistake and didn't blame the victim.

    The idea that police are never permitted to makes is what's insane. Not only are police not held accountable for their mistakes every day, cops will actually reward themselves for making those mistakes in the first place.

    None of that is even 1/10th as insane as suggesting that anyone is " jumping to conclusions based on second hand reports of limited information rather than waiting for all the facts." It's almost as if you jumped to a conclusion about this story with no information and without even a minimal attempt to learn the facts yourself.

  • Flinch||

    The no knock entry [with an inaudible whisper of "police" at best] are endangering both the public and police. The habits developed in the 'war on drugs' are bad indeed.

  • Two Buck Chuck||

    ACAB

  • clarkcountycriminalcops||

    That we are actually praising police in any way for this just demonstrates how far we've lowered the bar for law enforcement in this country.

    Yes, as humans, cops will make mistakes, but it shouldn't be this newsworthy when they do, simply because they admit their error. The police messed up, but we're praising them.
    Why?
    Because they didn't blame the victim of their mistake and promised to do better next time.
    That's something any five year-old should do.
    What's next, telling them, "Good Job!" when they wipe their own butts?

  • D-Pizzle||

    Hey Michael, you've got some cop jizz on your cheek.

  • Cthulunotmyfriend||

    It amazes me what they use these "no knock warrants" for. Drug dealing? Seriously?

  • Sonny Bono's Ghost||

    So just the word of and informant is enough for probably cause these days? No need for your after action review, I think I've found the problem.

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