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Chuck Schumer Wants to Legalize Marijuana: Reason Roundup

Plus: James Comey explains his obsession with locking up Martha Stewart, and Rudy Giuliani finds work.

SchumerAARON P. BERNSTEIN/REUTERS/NewscomSenate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D–N.Y.) came out in support of federal marijuana legalization Thursday night. The top Democrat in the Senate was previously a major opponent of legal weed, but now says, "I've seen too many people's lives ruined by the criminalization."

Schumer made these comments in an interview with Vice that aired on HBO last night. According to a transcript of the interview released ahead of time, he said, "Ultimately, it's the right thing to do. Freedom. If smoking marijuana doesn't hurt anybody else, why shouldn't we allow people to do it and not make it criminal?"

The Hill reports that Schumer plans to introduce a bill that would remove marijuana from the DEA's list of controlled substances, echoing previous legislation that enjoys the backing of several other Democratic senators:

Schumer would not be the first Democratic senator to push for looser federal marijuana policies.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-N.J.) introduced the Marijuana Justice Act in August. That legislation would eliminate marijuana's status as a Schedule 1 drug under the Controlled Substance Act and require federal courts to expunge the records of Americans who have prior marijuana convictions related to use or possession.

Sens. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.) and Bernie Sanders(I-Vt.) have all expressed support for the Marijuana Justice Act. A matching bill in the House also has more than 20 cosponsors.

Schumer is not the only major politician to change his mind about marijuana recently. Just last week, former Speaker of the House of Representatives John Boehner declared that "my thinking on cannabis has evolved." Despite being "unalterably opposed" to marijuana legalization in 2011, Boehner has now joined the board of advisors for Acreage Holdings, a cannabis corporation, alongside 2016 Libertarian Party Vice Presidential Candidate William Weld.

Even President Donald Trump has promised to respect the wishes of states that already legalized marijuana, like Colorado. Unfortunately, Attorney General Jeff Sessions remains adamantly opposed to legal weed, which means states might have a hard time trusting the federal government to leave them alone when it comes to pot.

Even so, the fact that former drug hardliners like Boehner and Schumer have suddenly seen the light is good news for supporters of legalization. Some day soon, the federal government might finally get out of the business of punishing pot smokers. Happy 4/20, everybody.

FREE MINDS

Civil liberties organizations are coming to the defense of Randa Jarrar, the Fresno State University professor under investigation for making offensive comments about recently deceased former First Lady Barbara Bush. Fresno officials initially seemed like they would be content to condemn Jarrar's celebration of Bush's death on Twitter, but subsequently announced they would investigate the controversial English professor.

"This was beyond free speech," said Fresno President Joseph Castro. "This was disrespectful."

The ACLU of Northern California, Defending Rights & Dissent, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, National Coalition Against Censorship, PEN America, Project Censored, and the Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Expression sent a joint letter to Fresno pointing out that disrespectful speech nevertheless enjoys First Amendment protection.

"We remind you that an investigation of constitutionally protected speech can itself violate the First Amendment," wrote the civil liberties groups.

Ben Shapiro, the conservative editor of The Daily Wire whose free speech rights are frequently threatened by illiberal mobs on college campuses, also penned a defense of Jarrar's right to make loathsome statements about Bush. David French, a senior writer for National Review, did so as well.

FREE MARKETS

Former FBI Director James Comey is really proud of how he handled the long-ago Martha Stewart insider trading case. While discussing his new memoir, A Higher Authority, with ABC's George Stephanopoulos, Comey revealed his reasoning for prosecuting Stewart, and how it affected his thinking about public corruption:

And folks don't realize this, but I almost hesitated and almost didn't bring the case against Martha Stewart, in hindsight, because she was rich and famous. And decided that if she were anybody else, any other ordinary person, she would be prosecuted. And what helped me come to that conclusion was I remembered a case I'd been involved in against an African-American minister in Richmond when I was a federal prosecutor there, who had lied to us during an investigation.

And I begged this minister, "Please don't lie to us because if you do, we're going to have to prosecute you." He lied. And at the end of the day, we had to prosecute him. And he went to jail for over a year. And as I stood in my office in Manhattan, I'm looking out at the Brooklyn Bridge, I remember this moment. And I'm thinking, "You know, nobody in New York knows that guy's name except me. Why would I treat Martha Stewart differently than that guy?"

And the reason would only be because she's rich and famous and because I'll be criticized for it. The truth matters in the criminal justice system. And if it's going to matter, we must prosecute people who lie in the middle of an investigation.

But Stewart wasn't brought down for lying to the authorities. Her crime was declaring publicly to the press that she had not committed insider trading. In the October 2003 issue of Reason, contributing editor Michael McMenamin famously argued that Stewart was the victim of an elaborate federal witch hunt. "Her crime is claiming to be innocent of a crime with which she was never charged," he wrote.

QUICK HITS

  • Today marks 19 years since the Columbine shooting, and activists are planning another National School Walkout to generate support for new gun control measures. But the anniversary of Columbine should call to mind all the terrible, freedom-crippling policies codified in the wake of the infamous school shooting. Hiring more cops and passing zero tolerance legislation didn't make schools any safer—it just made school more like prison.
  • Secretary of Defense James Mattis wanted Trump to get Congressional approval before bombing Syria.
  • The Justice Department has released Comey's memos.
  • Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani has joined Trump's legal defense team.
  • Zachary Wood, head of the Uncomfortable Learning group at William College, explains why people who disagree should still listen to each other.

Photo Credit: AARON P. BERNSTEIN/REUTERS/Newscom

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  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Toke up, boys.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    "Ultimately, it's the right thing to do. Freedom. If smoking marijuana doesn't hurt anybody else, why shouldn't we allow people to do it and not make it criminal?"

    Alright, who kidnapped Chuck Schumer and replaced him with a sensible doppelganger?

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    He's all talk when he doesn't have the votes to pass this thing in an election year when he thinks he can reclaim the Senate. Much like the Republicans on Obamacare and spending, it matters what they actually do when they get into power.

  • Get lit||

    I know but maybe this time is different with Trump and Schumer saying it and all the states legalizing it and the strong public support and tax generation potential.... I want to believe god damn!!

  • Inigo Montoya||

    This is probably what the Pope meant when he lamented that libertarians are infiltrating all the elite institutions.

    When you have a pompous superannuated lefty senator spouting libertarian talking points, you know the forces of anti-authoritarianism are winning.

    (I so wish I could believe this!)

  • MatthewSlyfield||

    Who cares who it is. The important question is how much do they want in exchange for never releasing him?

  • Juice||

    If _______ doesn't hurt anybody else, why shouldn't we allow people to do it and not make it criminal?

    Fill in the blank, Chuckie. Now look back on your entire career and cry.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    drug hardliners like Boehner

    This is a funny phrase.

  • Just Say'n||

    How come "boners for Boehner" was never a thing? I feel like that was a missed opportunity.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    YOU AIN'T TEA-BAGGED UNTIL YOU GET A CLOSE-UP OF A WRINKLED BOHNER!

    (2010 era conservative)

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Today marks 19 years since the Columbine shooting...

    Anything to keep gun control in the news.

  • croaker||

    If I were running things, all those buses full of students playing truant would go directly to Juvie.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    You never jumped on any excuse to skip school when you were a kid?

  • Tony||

    Perhaps if you'd like to put a stop to that you gun maximalists should lift a goddamn finger to do a little psycho control.

  • TuIpa||

    "gun maximalists'

    Trying out a new, stupid, epithet I see.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Gun Maximalists and Psycho Control would both be decent band names.

  • Tom Bombadil||

    Psycho Killer
    Qu'est-ce que c'est

  • IamNotEvil||

    I'd go with unconTROLLed Psychos.

  • twist||

    Tony, your posts reads like an attempt to get someone to shoot you, get better with words.

  • Tony||

    Someone wants to both shoot me and get better with words? Or perhaps you should have used a semicolon. Watch your number agreement as well.

  • Tom Bombadil||

    You watch your well watching as well, you.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Well, well, well!

  • TuIpa||

    Hi I'm Tony, I don't understand commas.

  • TuIpa||

    No it's fine as constructed. You seem to be as good with grammar as you are with economics or politics.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    You want me to be able to carry everywhere?

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    I can't believe that just last year it had been 18 years since Columbine.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Today marks 19 years since the Columbine shooting

    You know what else today is the anniversary of?

  • Get lit||

    Hitler was vomited out of a vagina on this day?

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Way to fuck up the game, brochacho.

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    This is why we can't have nice things

  • Just Say'n||

    "Today marks 19 years since the Columbine shooting, and activists are planning another National School Walkout to generate support for new gun control measures."

    Yesterday was the anniversary of the federal government killing 70 Americans. Disarm the government- not the citizens

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    Let me get this straight. Kids... in Colorado... want to walk out of school... on 4/20.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Former FBI Director James Comey is really proud of how he handled the long-ago Martha Stewart insider trading case.

    It was a good thing.

  • Tom Bombadil||

    Although, at the time he felt a bit queasy, nauseous even, and once woke up in the middle of the night to write a memo to himself.

  • OpenBordersLiberal-tarian||

    Today marks 19 years since the Columbine shooting, and activists are planning another National School Walkout to generate support for new gun control measures. But the anniversary of Columbine should call to mind all the terrible, freedom-crippling policies codified in the wake of the infamous school shooting. Hiring more cops and passing zero tolerance legislation didn't make schools any safer—it just made school more like prison.

    As a libertarian and #BlackLivesMatter supporter, I am always suspicious of cops. But common sense gun safety legislation cannot be lumped in with any "freedom-crippling policies." No civilian needs a deadly military style assault weapon.

    I recommend everybody read President Obama's tribute to the teenage gun safety activists in Time's Most Influential People list.

  • Nardz||

    A-

  • Rhywun||

    I recommend everybody read President Obama's tribute to the teenage gun safety activists in Time's Most Influential People list.

    lolbarf

  • ||

    OMFG.

    What a half-witted twit Obama is.

    That was....blech.

  • Old Mexican - Mostly Harmless||

    Re: Open something, something, dark side.

    No civilian needs a deadly military style assault weapon.


    Your statement above is unquestionable proof that civilians NEED a deadly military style assault weapon.

  • TuIpa||

    Well, yeah, we have to fight off you brown rapists and drug dealers.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Secretary of Defense James Mattis wanted Trump to get Congressional approval before bombing Syria.

    It's not like they would have said no.

  • Tom Bombadil||

    It would be the easiest win hugely of his first term.

  • Rhywun||

    Hiring more cops and passing zero tolerance legislation didn't make schools the United States any safer—it just made school the United States more like prison.

    FTFY

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Zachary Wood, head of the Uncomfortable Learning group at William College, explains why people who disagree should still listen to each other.

    NOT INTERESTED.

  • silver.||

    Guy sounds like a fag

  • ||

    in an interview with Vice that aired on HBO last night

    Moynihan got scooped by a co-worker. He must be seething.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Like he needs another excuse for day-drinking.

  • Rhywun||

    activists are planning another National School Walkout

    My morning bubblehead news idiots were going on and on about "student-led protests". I really need to stop watching that garbage, for my sanity.

  • OpenBordersLiberal-tarian||

    Just what are you implying here? Are you suggesting David Hogg did not independently arrive at the conclusion that boycotting Vanguard and BlackRock was a wise tactical decision?

  • Rhywun||

    I am suggesting that the entire thing is being staged by the same racist and sexist commie agitators that are running the "women's marches", and every dopey mainstream media news outlet is uncritically lapping it up.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    I keep reading that as "sexy commie agitators." It gives me pause.

  • FreeRadical||

    Mmm, a hot Russian babe wearing nothing but one of those fuzzy hats with the Hammer and Sickle on it.

  • Old Mexican - Mostly Harmless||

    I nornally turn to Fox & Friends when Chris Cuomo and the other bubblehead start lecturing us, The People, on how eeeevil guns are, but then the "Suck Trump's Dick Squad" quickly remind me why I stopped watching Fox & Friends in the first place.

    Like Andy Levy quipped in "S. E. Cupp Unfiltered", Fox & Friends' main job is to scare and comfort Trump's base, all at the same time: scare them with made-up hobgoblins such as immigrants who takum er jebz and marry our daughters or cheap Chinese goods, and comfort them by telling them that everything is going to be all right.

  • Just Say'n||

    I'll say this, Tucker Carlson and Laura Ingraham were the only cable TV talking heads pushing back against the president's bombing of Syria. Yes, Fox is overly friendly to Trump, much the same way the other outlets were overly friendly to the last administration. But, Tucker Carlson pushing back against the media narrative on the Syria conflict was great.

  • Inigo Montoya||

    I hope Schumer starts smoking it because the guy needs to mellow a bit and maybe remove that giant stick up his butt. Nothing screams "I'm unbelievably uptight" more than the need to control other people and try to make them just like yourself.

  • FreeRadical||

    Almost nothing could convince me that Schumer is not an evil, self-aggrandizing asswipe. So the question is, what's in it for him?

    Regardless, it's still good news.

  • CatoTheChipper||

    Schumer is an evil, self-aggrandizing asswipe who reads the polls.

    His interpretation of the polls indicate that this opinion shift will garner votes, which enhances the probability that he can continue being an evil, self-aggrandizing asswipe.

    It's that simple.

  • Old Mexican - Mostly Harmless||

    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D–N.Y.) came out in support of federal marijuana legalization Thursday night.


    Always late to the party, aren't you, Chucky?

    Secretary of Defense James Mattis wanted Trump to get Congressional approval before bombing Syria.


    But Trump tweeted, so....

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    The Libertarian's Case for Big Government

    https://goo.gl/gybQJF

    LoveCons, John, and Mikey Trumptard types have finally taken over the Libertarian movement.

  • Old Mexican - Mostly Harmless||

    And then I find out it's Bloomberg, and... I yawn.

  • Rhywun||

    it's Bloomberg

    Up next... the Libertarian Case for More Gun Control!

  • ||

    Alex needs a lawyer after having his face above "The Libertarian's Case for Big Government" for 7 minutes.

  • ||

    "The Libertarian's Case that Big Government Doesn't Necessarily Suck in this Particular Way" would be more accurate.

    "Of course we're not yet France" would be another possibility.

  • Just Say'n||

    Will Wilkinson first published this conclusion and I don't think anyone in their right mind would consider Wilkinson to be conservative or a Trumptard. Frankly, only idiots would even consider him to be remotely libertarian, either, but that's how he presents himself.

  • Palin's Buttplug||

    The George Mason guy is right. Regulations don't affect business dynamism any more. I worked in Enterprise software for decades and federal regs were non-existent in most industries (except for payroll software).

    (Energy and banking excepted)

  • Just Say'n||

    'Libertarians' for regulation! Christ, that's dumb

  • Brian||

    " I worked in Enterprise software for decades"

    Explains a lot.

  • TuIpa||

    Do you really believe him though?

  • Brian||

    I really wouldn't lie about spending decades on accounting, ERP, and database software.

  • TuIpa||

    PB would.

  • Tom Bombadil||

    PB is trying to convince us that his job isn't changing his mother's colostomy bag in exchange for first crack at her welfare check.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    If we were doing Hit'n'Run superlatives, shreek would definitely be a strong contender for Most Likely To Go to Prison for Welfare Fraud.

  • Scarecrow Repair & Chippering||

    Wanna bet?

  • Michael S. Langston||

    Regulations don't affect business dynamism any more.

    BS. It absolutely does, including in ERP software, such as regulations requiring retaining all communications for the past 7 to 10 years, just in case.

    Privacy and security regulations too.

    Not saying all those regulations are bad or whatever, but to act as of they're not impacting is idiotic.

    And where you actually dealt with ERP software or not, you obviously weren't deep enough into the conversation to get to this point. As while your company may have moved to People Soft or whatever under your guidance, did it not occur to you that any regulations their software had to built to comply with were charged to your company?

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    "We remind you that an investigation of constitutionally protected speech can itself violate the First Amendment," wrote the civil liberties groups.

    You take public funds you can be saddled with an employee that puts your organization in a bad light. Choose in the first place your employees wisely, I guess.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    Choose in the first place your employees wisely

    What even is this phrasing? You're actually Tommy Wiseau, aren't you.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    I enjoy challenging my readers.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    You are tearing me apart, Lisa!

  • BestUsedCarSales||

    No, that's Fist.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    I'm fed up with this world.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    He did more than just The Room, you know. (I think.)

  • Rhywun||

    And people wonder why the folks at the DMV, the post office, and other pubsec jobs are so nasty.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    The top Democrat in the Senate was previously a major opponent of legal weed, but now says, "I've seen too many people's lives ruined by the criminalization."

    Does this mean he regrets his role in the Silk Road prosecution?

  • DajjaI||

    good news for supporters of legalization

    Sorry to crash the party, but pot smoking has recently been linked to adverse events such as the logical fallacy seizure as well as concept reflexivity paradox attacks. The government needs to slow its roll. Scientists should investigate these phenomenon carefully to minimize any threat to public safety. And we haven't even begun to evaluate the dreaded mutually assured enlightenment convergence singularity.

  • Libertarian||

    Boehner and Schemer, after years of being anti weed, are coming out now in favor of legalization. Weird. I mean, now that it's a legitimate business in many states and promising astronomical growth with concomitant piles of money and investments swirling around it, it's weird that politicians are suddenly seeing the justice of personal responsibility. Kudos to them.

  • Citizen X - #6||

    It was a matter of time. The first poll showing majority nationwide support for marijuana decriminalization came out, what, a couple years ago, so every politician in the country has had plenty of time to focus group the issue with their own constituencies, figure out how to benefit, and plot a big road-to-Damascus come-out. Apres Schumer, le deluge.

  • Rhywun||

    Besides, the pool of smokers who are propping up their pension schemes is drying up.

  • OpenBordersLiberal-tarian||

    Absolutely heartbreaking piece from The Daily Beast: Hillary Clinton On Election Night: 'They Were Never Going to Let Me Be President'

    Life can be so unfair. Hillary was the most qualified candidate for President ever. She did everything right — and it still wasn't enough to overcome Russian interference and a biased, sexist media that relentlessly attacked her while letting Drumpf coast by, virtually unchallenged.

  • Rhywun||

    hahahahahahahahahahah

  • Nardz||

    A

  • Leo Kovalensky II||

    "The Deplorables always got a laugh, over living-room chats in the Hamptons, at dinner parties under the stars on Martha's Vineyard, over passed hors d'oeuvres in Beverly Hills, and during sunset cocktails in Silicon Valley," Chozick continues.

    GAG

    Also, OBL... this post is some of your best work to date.

  • Old Mexican - Mostly Harmless||

    Hillary Clinton On Election Night: 'They Were Never Going to Let Me Be President'


    She meant the voices in her head.

  • Sevo||

    From the link:
    "The challenge on the campaign was that you had a reporter holding the Clintons to a higher standard through a lower standard of reporting."

    Yeah, none of the other candidates were called on destroying subpoenaed evidence, were they?

  • Ron||

    "higher standard through a lower standard" is some of the best double speak I've seen in a long time

  • Rebel Scum||

    Hillary was the most qualified candidate for President ever.

    ROTFLOL!

    *gasps*

    LOLOLOL!

    Sure, kid. She's a regular Thomas Jefferson, only way smarter and better in every way. //sarc

  • OpenBordersLiberal-tarian||

    Thomas Jefferson, like many of the privileged white males who lived in that era, was a slave owner. Of course Hillary Clinton is better than him.

  • silver.||

    I read somewhere that she was physically assaulting her aides on election night. I think they had to feed her some Valium.

    Worst. Election. Ever.

    "When all was said and done, according to Chozick's book, the somewhat acrimonious relationship between the Clinton campaign and The New York Times continued, even after the campaign ended [..]"

    Now the campaign is engaged in a somewhat lachrymose relationship with The Daily Beast.

  • Jordan||

    "Ultimately, it's the right thing to do. Freedom. If smoking marijuana doesn't hurt anybody else, why shouldn't we allow people to do it and not make it criminal?"

    *Head explodes*

  • CatoTheChipper||

    Meh.

    Schumer reads the polls and the polls said to back off the war on marijuana.

    Note that he's only backing off on weed.

    He's still staunch drug warrior of the worst sort when it comes to opioids and other narcotics. That's because the polls do not indicate that people really understand the difference between a vice and a crime or believe in the universality of individual liberty.

  • Tom Bombadil||

    "This was beyond free speech," said Fresno President Joseph Castro. "This was disrespectful."

    I believe it was Thomas Jefferson who insisted we have a 1st amendment to ensure respectful speech wouldn't be stifled.

  • Tom Bombadil||

    "Ultimately, it's the right thing to do. Freedom. If smoking marijuana doesn't hurt anybody else, why shouldn't we allow people to do it and not make it criminal?"

    Only took 70+ years to think your way out of that paper bag?

  • Tom Bombadil||

    "Schumer is not the only major politician to change his mind about marijuana recently. Just last week, former Speaker of the House of Representatives John Boehner declared that "my thinking on cannabis has evolved."

    Boehner didn't change his mind, he changed his patron.

  • FreeRadical||

    Awesome comment. Amazing how that always seems to work with these guys.

  • mschultz||

    Comey's book is titled "A Higher Loyalty".

    Also fairly certain the Mattis story seeking Congressional approval was rebuked by both the WH and Mattis himself: http://thehill.com/policy/defe.....pproval-on

  • ||

    "Ben Shapiro, the conservative editor of The Daily Wire whose free speech rights are frequently threatened by illiberal mobs on college campuses, also penned a defense of Jarrar's right to make loathsome statements about Bush. David French, a senior writer for National Review, did so as well."

    So much for conservatives being as bad as progressives, eh?

    I'm glad they're doing so because it should once and for all make clear EXACTLY who are a threat to free speech.

    No more 'to be sure' bull shit. Let's do this thing and defend liberty.

    WHO'S WITH ME!?

  • Joe_JP||

    Where are the left leaning publications saying she should be fired?

  • Just Say'n||

    They never call for one of their own to be fired. Are we still playing the "both sides" game? That's cute

  • ||

    Er, because they wouldn't? Hello.

    When have you EVER leftist publication defend anyone on the grounds of free speech; let alone conservative?

    That's the point. So conservatives are being more consistent on this message. I look forward to when Shapiro is defended on, say, Maddow or some other prog outlets.

  • CatoTheChipper||

    Once upon a time, not so very long ago, the American left defended the universal right of free speech. Seriously. The left advocated the right of Marxists and big-government socialists of every stripe to communicate freely in an era when antiquated 20th century limited-government capitalism was the prevalent in the American zeitgeist. It was a sincerely held position of the American left, and they would also defend the free speech rights of right-wing crazies.

    Now, the progressive American left is ascendant so, of course, their position has changed.

  • Michael S. Langston||

    In the 80s and 90s the ACLU routinely defended Nazi groups rights of free speech and freedom of assembly. They were mostly lauded for it as I recall.

    But no more - the ACLU with the rat of the left with full Marxist and freedom of speech is a threat to their end goals, so they don't support it anymore.

    Hell, these days, the national ACLU and talking heads, probably think Alan Dershowitz is an evil Nazi libertarian Trump lover of they were to read any of his writings from that time period on free speech.

  • Rebel Scum||

    Let's do this thing and defend liberty.

    WHO'S WITH ME!?

    Huzzah! *shoulders rifle*

  • Nardz||

    Which one will be the greater number today?

    A) Reason articles/authors that assert ____'s position as ____ but completely ignore contrary statements by ____ and/or quote ____ and write as if that quote says something other than what it says (see articles about Jarrar and Pompeo for examples)
    B) Reason articles about opioid regulation

    Vote below

  • Nardz||

    I'll vote (A), as it seems to be habitual for Reason writers to do little to no actual work and simply write out their own opinion as if their imagination is real, while the actual statements of those they attack mean what Reason writers tell us what they mean instead of what they actually say...
    but (B) is always a contender. I'd put the over/under at 4.5 and have a real hard time deciding which to take

  • Tom Bombadil||

    Thanks for playing.

  • silver.||

    B) Reason articles about opioid regulation marijuana decriminalization

    Over 5

  • Sevo||

    "The top Democrat in the Senate was previously a major opponent of legal weed, but now says, "I've seen too many people's lives ruined by the criminalization.""

    Proof that, if you keep hitting an idiot in the head with facts, they sometimes will learn.

  • Tom Bombadil||

    Schumer's job is to get elected.

    He is not leading a sea change, he is being sucked along in its slipstream.

  • TuIpa||

    He's just trying to steal the issue from Trump.

  • This Machine Chips Fascists||

    Exactly. Schumer didn't think his way out of a paper bag, he's just following the money like a good little whore.

  • CatoTheChipper||

    The only fact that Schumer cares about are those he infers from the polls. There has been a sea change in the polling on weed in the past few years.

  • Ken Shultz||

    I think this might be the Capitals' year!

  • ||

    lol.

  • Eidde||

    "Zachary Wood, head of the Uncomfortable Learning group at William College, explains why people who disagree should still listen to each other."

    Blah, blah, blah, whatever.

  • Ken Shultz||

    You'd think it would be nice to get away from ENB's sex obsessions for a day.

    But then you get the fresh hell of Robby's work.

  • ||

    Just be glad Dalmia is doing them.

  • ||

    isn't

  • FreeRadical||

    Do I want to watch Dalmia doing Robby?... Mmm, no.

    Do I want to watch her doing ENB?... Maybe?

  • Brandybuck||

    Out in the real world, you say something stupid on social media and you can get fired. And no one will be collecting legal defense fees for you if it happens. But on college campuses it can't happens 'cuz free speech.

    I'm all for FIRE and what they stand for. But they're wrong on this. This isn't about free speech, or it would apply to every single employee in the nation, and not just college professors. This is about freedom of association, and the professor's employer no longer wants to be associate with her. It's not academic freedom because her actions were not related to her academics. Her actions embarrassed her employer in her employer's community. Moreover the parents of the her potential students are complaining to her employer.

    I know someone who was fired from his teaching job for what he posted on Facebook. Moreover, he was permanently blackballed from ever teaching in that county again. He got drunk, ranted, and embarrassed his employer. He's a good friend of mine, but he fucked up and had to pay the price. The county did not want someone like that teaching in their schools. The analogy to Jarrar is exact.

  • ||

    Good point.

    Plus the arrogance and petulance she displayed. I know, as a business owner, an employee of mine said something along those lines....there would be a little chat. There is something to be said of decorum. I've had to let go of people I felt could damage my business and 'brand'. Free speech sure. But there can be consequences.

  • Brandybuck||

    ""But the anniversary of Columbine should call to mind all the terrible, freedom-crippling policies codified in the wake of the infamous school shooting.""

    One of the resutls was the treating of geeks, nerds, and anyone slightly asocial or neuratypical as a potential mass murderer. If you weren't a part of the in crowd you were suspect. That's gone away (mostly) but for a couple of years it was damned painful. The talking heads on television didn't give a shit because they were all ex jocks and cheerleaders. "Is that D&D geek down the street going to murder your children? Story at eleven!"

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