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Free Minds & Free Markets

Students for a Freer Future

As U.S. campus politics deteriorate, a global movement of young libertarians finds its footing.

These are not encouraging times for libertarians on campus. Studies show millennials' political views are much more reliably liberal than those of the population at large, and college students increasingly lean to the progressive left. In 1981, about 20 percent of freshmen described themselves as "liberal" or "far-left" (as opposed to "middle of the road" or "conservative"); today, more than a third do.

Joanna AndreassonJoanna AndreassonStudents and professors who dissent from leftist orthodoxy often keep their views to themselves, for fear of suffering social or reputational harm. That can make it difficult for libertarians to identify each other. Some of the most elite colleges in the country maintain academic departments that teach, with a quasi-religious fervor, that capitalism is the root of all the world's problems. The activist left increasingly views free speech with skepticism or even outright hostility.

The right, meanwhile, occasionally makes overtures to libertarians; young conservatives tend to be much more in step with libertarians on issues such as drug legalization and gay marriage. But many conservatives aren't interested in discussion either. They invite the same provocative speakers to campus over and over again for the deliberate purpose of angering rather than persuading their progressive classmates. The Trump era has exposed the conservative movement—young and old—as much too willing to embrace populism, protectionism, and political incorrectness if doing so succeeds at "owning the libs," as critics of this strategy have derisively nicknamed it. And conservatives are often no less inclined to harness shutdown tactics than their counterparts on the left: Jordan Peterson, a Canadian psychology professor whose war on political correctness has made him the philosopher king of the young right, occasionally threatens to sue his critics for defamation.

Campus activism in the Trump era is a battle between two extremes: an uncompromising, take-no-prisoners leftism at odds with the principles of intellectual diversity and free speech, and an obnoxious, trolling conservatism that seems perfectly happy to self-destruct as long as it annoys a few progressives on its way out. Yet even as campus political culture has deteriorated, some surprising bright spots have emerged. Among those is the rise of a professionalized global student libertarian movement.

Students For Liberty (SFL) traces its origins to the summer of 2007, when Alexander McCobin, then a student at the University of Pennsylvania, decided to organize a small roundtable of libertarian students interning in Washington, D.C. The meeting lasted for three hours—and would have gone longer if the group hadn't been kicked out of the room by the George Mason University cleaning crew.

One of the attendees was Sloane Frost, who now chairs the SFL board. "Being a student at Cornell, I thought I was the only one in the universe who was not a socialist," she says. "I was super excited about the roundtable."

The enthusiasm McCobin encountered gave him an idea: Why not host a conference for student libertarians who were interested in learning from each other? The following February, he and some friends, including Frost, hosted a conference at Columbia University in New York City. Some 100 students from more than 40 schools showed up. The plan from the beginning, McCobin recalls, was "We're going to bring everyone together and we're going to find a way to make it work. And it did."

At the time, there was no national, coordinated effort to support libertarian college students. Individual colleges had libertarian clubs, but these people had no idea what folks on other campuses were doing, no idea what kinds of tactics were effective, and little clue about the broader professional network that could help them. "We were all operating independently, making tons of mistakes," says McCobin. "I just wanted to share best practices with each other."

Today, Students for Liberty is among the largest and best-known organizations for promoting libertarianism on college campuses. According to the group's latest annual report, more than 65,000 people worldwide attended SFL conferences, seminars, and training sessions in the last year, compared to 56,000 in the previous 10 years combined.

In little more than a decade, Students for Liberty has grown from a small cadre of ambitious student interns into a vast network that includes 2,100 active students in more than 100 countries, and into an international force supporting local activism in corners of the world where the threats to freedom are a lot more serious than trigger warnings.

These days, it's easy to think of U.S. college campuses as uniquely inhospitable to freedom, but international students often face more dire struggles. They have also achieved the student libertarian movement's most visible successes.

In 2012, McCobin met Luis, a young man from Venezuela who wanted to start a Students for Liberty chapter in his home country. McCobin recalls asking him if he really wanted to risk arrest or persecution. "His response was, 'Alexander, I'm going to do this with or without you,'" McCobin says. "'I would just rather do it with you.'" (Luis' last name has been omitted here for his protection.)

At present, SFL's Venezuela coordinator, Jorge Jraissati, is working to call attention to the numerous human rights abuses and widespread deprivations of political rights committed under the socialist regime of President Nicolás Maduro. In a 2017 interview with The Huffington Post, Jraissati thanked SFL for helping him educate people abroad about the plight of Venezuelans.

The risks for these students is real: Authorities in Venezuela and Belarus have arrested SFL members; Russia has banned some from ever returning. SFL activist Alieu Bangura had to flee Gambia after learning that agents of then–President Yahya Jammeh's dictatorial regime were coming to question him. He lived with SFL's program coordinator in Nigeria until Jammeh was forced to step down in January 2017. But despite the tough conditions, the organization's footprint has continued to expand.

Today, the "African Students For Liberty" Facebook page has more than 5,000 followers, and there are SFL chapters all over the continent, with the most recent launching this year in Mali. Activists affiliated with the organization have been working to spread awareness about the benefits of economic freedom in India. And in 2015, Students for Liberty's Brazil liaison, Kim Kataguiri, led a 200,000-person march against Dilma Rousseff, his country's corrupt left-wing president.

Kataguiri—at the time a 19-year-old college dropout who had learned about economics by reading online about Milton Friedman—once told Larry Reed of the Foundation for Economic Education that people close to Rousseff's government threatened him for his activism. "I knew from the very beginning of our Free Brazil Movement that we would be fighting against criminals," he said. "What the people want now is less government and more money in their own pockets where it belongs."

A year later, Brazil's Senate impeached Rousseff and she was removed from office.

Another leader of the anti-Rousseff movement, Julio Lins, has worked to make local government policy in the Manaus region of the Amazon more amenable to ride-sharing services, launched a campaign for public office, and begun hosting events for young libertarians.

"Students travel up to 300 miles to attend events at his club," says Kyle Walker, director of international programs at SFL. "They basically take a boat for a couple days up the river to go to SFL events."

SFL's founders were not the first student libertarians to present an organized challenge to the dominant forces of leftism and conservatism they encountered. Libertarian and anarchist factions emerged on campuses during the 1960s as reactions to both Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), the far-left activist group, and Young Americans for Freedom (YAF), the conservative youth organization founded in the home of William F. Buckley.

YAF initially tried to hold onto its libertarian members, insisting that both the "trads" (traditional conservatives) and the "rads" (radical libertarians and anarchists) had a mutual enemy in communism. But as the decade wore on, the war in Vietnam and the draft galvanized the rads. (YAF formally opposed the draft, but libertarians demanded support for draft resistance as well.) By 1969, a libertarian caucus within the club had emerged and begun agitating for rebellion.

On some campuses, libertarians could be found allying with progressive student groups. A cohort of students at the University of Kansas decided they had more in common with the left than the right and switched from YAF to SDS, as chronicled in Senior Editor Brian Doherty's 2007 book Radicals for Capitalism: A Freewheeling History of the Modern American Libertarian Movement.

Libertarians had their own clubs too. An Alliance of Libertarian Activists came into existence at Berkeley in the '60s. A leader of that group, Danny Rosenthal, was arrested over his involvement with the Free Speech Movement, which united all kinds of politically active students against the University of California's censorious administration.

The 1969 YAF national convention ended with the expulsion of some libertarian and anarchist members—but by then, many of the more radical students had already connected with each other. A few months later, activists hosted a conference for libertarians in New York City; more than 200 people attended.

By the late '70s, Students for a Libertarian Society and the Libertarian Party's Young Libertarian Alliance had come into being to promote cross-campus organization among pro-liberty students. These organizations died off during the 1980s, however, partly due to tactical disagreements between their purist and pragmatic wings. For the next two decades, there was essentially no national libertarian group involved in student organizing—until McCobin came along.

While SFL has left arguably its most impressive mark on politics abroad, it's also cultivated stateside talent: a dedicated base of alumni, many of whom now hold influential positions in libertarian organizations such as the Cato Institute, Americans for Prosperity, and even Reason.

Indeed, SFL was a formative part of my own college years, critical to my intellectual and professional development. I attended my first SFL event, the international conference that now goes by the name "LibertyCon," in 2009 at the behest of my roommate at the University of Michigan. He had returned from one of the earliest SFL confabs full of wonder that we weren't alone in the world—that there were other students out there talking about the kinds of things we stayed up all night debating, like privatizing the police and ending the war on drugs.

The intense intellectual nature of most SFL events has generated considerable devotion among attendees, who frequently must brave inclement weather to attend. The Columbia University conference that kick-started the organization took place in the midst of a massive blizzard. One group of students flying from California had their planes rerouted to D.C.—and then hopped a train to New Jersey, followed by a bus into Manhattan.

I, too, have a stuck-in-a-snowstorm-en-route-to-SFL story. It's a 10-hour drive from Ann Arbor to Washington, D.C.—longer by bus, and much longer in bad conditions. But time flies when you're discussing and debating ideas—the gold standard, immigration, the very legitimacy of the state—with friends. Through SFL and the wider libertarian world the club put me in touch with, I made more friends than I could begin to count.

There are many reasons to despair over the current state of campus culture, but the successes of the student libertarian movement over the past decade are cause not to be too pessimistic about kids these days. It isn't all lib-owning and speaker shutdowns: The ideas of liberty are alive and well.

Photo Credit: Joanna Andreasson. Source images: CSA Images/iStock

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  • Remember to keep it all polit||

    Some of the most elite colleges in the country maintain academic departments that teach, with a quasi-religious fervor, that capitalism is the root of all the world's problems.


    We have all heard that Republicans are outnumbered 10-1 or 100-1 in academia, if there are any at all, matched by political donations by university zip codes. Avowed Marxians dominate intellectual life at universities. Academia is renowned for petty bureaucratic infighting, seniority squabbles, obscure virtue signalling (endowed chair names, cap and gown colors and stripes and where the tassels point, adding Ph.D. to their names and insisting on being called Doctor), arcane historical traditions, pomp and circumstance.

    Amazingly similar to the military, no? Both are self-contained, isolated from real-life, propped up by government financing, and treated as essential to the country's mere existence. But even the most far-left elected Democrats go no further than calling themselves Democrat-Socialists, and I have never heard of any elected Republican calling for a military-style civilian life.

    Religion also comes to mind, but the low startup cost allows far more variety.

    And yet, somehow, the country is not overrun by Marxians or militias or priests. Astrology is about as reliable for practical purposes. No successful business or organization runs on astrological principles, unless maybe some gardening club somewhere only meets when the stars are aligned.

  • Remember to keep it all polit||

    I often wonder what the alternatives are and how we got to where we are today.

    Every organization has chains of command, bureaucrats, and traditions. Yet the more rigid they are, the more susceptible they are to competition, and the more likely to come begging to the government for sustenance. What would universities and militaries be like without government support, if carried to the extreme?

    Universities would drop fields whose only purpose is to train the next generation of professors, and which students take only for the sheepskin. The classic humanities would flourish as online courses for curious adults. Archaeology and similar sciences would revert to virtue-signalling donations. Employers would find better ways of screening out lazy and unreliable prospects.

    Militias would embrace cheap, reliable, practical weapons, and automation would replace and protect valuable humans. Special forces would survive for the gung ho. $10B aircraft carriers and $1B bombers would vanish as wistful memories of exciting toys, but they are only useful for offensive operations anyway.

    Conservatives think a militia self-defense is fit only for alternative histories; progressives think self-supported universities would turn the populace into hillbillies. But extremes are good for thinking of realistic intermediate states. The current conditions are nobody's idea of sustainable.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    Why got where we are in part because !cCarthyism came to an end. McCarthy was right about the people he went after. Once stopped, the marxists flourished. It will probably take a lot of violence and death to fix things now, since we allowed Marxism here for so long, and now that there are millions of them. And they don't give a fuck about losing elections.

    So get ready to put up and fight back, or be be enslaved by these soulless totalitarians.

  • mtrueman||

    "So get ready to put up and fight back, or be be enslaved by these soulless totalitarians."

    If you haven't got the courage to speak up under your own name, maybe you better resign yourself to a life of slavery. Cowards don't fight back or free themselves.

  • BigT||

    "If you haven't got the courage to speak up under your own name, maybe you better resign yourself to a life of slavery. "

    Self-awareness. Look it up.

  • mtrueman||

    "What would universities and militaries be like without government support,"

    Careful what you ask for. University of Phoenix and Hezbollah fit the bill. I haven't seen any support for either in these pages.

  • Remember to keep it all polit||

    I guess what I am saying is that academic Marxism has shown itself to be as irrelevant to society as close order drill. Safe spaces will be a movie joke in ten years, like raccoon coats and spike helmets.

    Socialists can only survive as long as they are not in control. History shows that. They've fucked up Venezuela, but capitalism saved China's bacon and threatens to save India's too.

    I despise collectivists, populists, nationalists, and all other statists. I despair over how they've managed to grow the US bureaucracy. I don't see any political path for the US to recover and rid itself of all this statism; Trump's so-called war on regulations has only managed to slow the growth, not reverse it, as evidenced the the standard metric still being how many pages of regulations were added. I will rejoice if that metric goes negative, but I don't expect it.

  • Remember to keep it all polit||

    The hope I see is technology moving more and more of society online, using encryption and mesh networks to hide productive work from government notice in private virtual economies. Virtual worlds will create generalized machines which will adapt to whatever the shadow economies want, such as medical care. When you can analyze your own blood non-invasively and create your own custom medicines; when robots can set broken bones and surgically replace worn-out organs with home-grown dna-specific versions, nationalized medicine will fade away, leaving the government holding an empty bag.

    Special-purpose computers died out long ago. The F-22 electronics went through three or four generations before first flight simply because mil-spec components couldn't keep up with common civilian parts. Biohackers innovate from garages and basements; 3D printers make a mockery of gun control laws. I have little doubt that within 50 years, computers will analyze toilet contents or non-invasive blood scans to detect cancer so early that by the time you get up from the toilet, a 3D chemical printer has already popped out a pill to cure it.

    No government can control that future.

  • Remember to keep it all polit||

    What I mean by general purpose computers saving the day is that 3D printers will eventually become so general purpose that they can not only print real metal car and gun parts, for instance, but also pills. It may not be one machine, but you won't have to rely on a special purpose 3D pill printer; it may be used to print electronics, mostly, and that is unlikely to be under government control.

    At that point, it will be just a matter of what recipes you download. The FDA won't have any control over it. People will die, there will be spam and malware, but quality sources will survive, and the combination of digital recipes, cheap basic chemicals, and general purpose 3D printers will make the government irrelevant.

    Even national borders will become less and less important. Right now, they serve mainly to containerize and isolate legal systems. As more and more of life moves online, meat world laws will mean less and less.

  • SQRLSY One||

    "The hope I see is technology moving more and more of society online, using encryption and mesh networks to hide productive work from government notice in private virtual economies."

    I like your thinking, BUT, I cannot survive by eating virtual food, wearing virtual clothes, and having my physical body occupy virtual space that's heated and cooled by computer code. However, computer power CAN help us defend freedom! Here's how:

    WHEN are naked titty bars (and sellers of cheap plastic flutes, and similar politically incorrect establishments) going to follow a very simple method here?

    A) Find the local and State laws for "swearing in" rituals in court. "On my Momma's eye, hope to die", etc.

    B) Film all entering customers certifying that they are entering ONLY for private enjoyment, and are NOT State narc-dicks, and have them recite "On my Momma's eye, hope to die", etc.

    C) Immediately upload all such filmed rituals to a place with REAL internet freedom, such as Iceland.

    D) If busted, trot out dick-head-narc's recorded "swearing" the exact same oath they just gave in court, and ask the jury, "Now WHY should you believe this testimony here today"?

  • SQRLSY One||

    In case you did not follow my comment about how to protect yourself as a seller of cheap plastic flutes, from Government Almighty...

    (To find precise details on what NOT to do, to avoid the flute police, please see http://www.churchofsqrls.com/DONT_DO_THIS/ ) … This has been a pubic service, courtesy of the Church of SQRLS!

  • Remember to keep it all polit||

    Yes, we'd still need to eat and live somewhere.

    But more and more employment is from home and does not require even knowing where the company is located.

    More people watch sports on TV than in person; you get better views, instant replays, and all sorts of commentary which is impossible or not as good in person. This will extend to travel. Why go to the Grand Canyon or Notre Dame Cathedral in person when you can see far more detail by renting an on-site drone or watching pre-made videos? Yes, some people prefer the real deal, whether sports or travel, but far more people can visit famous locations by video than in person, and it's so much cheaper that people can visit more places without the aggravation of foreign languages and customs, surly taxi drivers and hotel staff, jet lag, and hours traveling inside a tube at 30,000 feet.

    My claim is not that all life will be in virtual online communities, only that more and more of daily life will be online and inaccessible to prying governments; and that as 3D printers become more capable, a whole lot of what government regulates, such as medicine, will be printed on demand at home, and the only inputs will be cheap chemical stocks with so many other uses that governments will not be able to control them. Gun parts are trivia to printers which make internal combustion engines. Pills are trivial to printers which make electronics.

  • JFree||

    Technology as a replacement for actual daily life is a fool's errand. Those who keep it going will expect to be paid. They will devolve to ad-based models. And those models will obliterate the freedom of everyone using that tech in the name of 'free stuff'.

  • SQRLSY One||

    "Remember to keep it all polit"'s posts though do score a hit (IMHO) about 3-D printing. The full impact of this is a ways off; who knows how long? But when we can 3-D print drug molecules at the molecular level... Coupled with individualized genetic analysis of me the consumer of those drugs, allowing me to use customized drugs that work for ME (and very few others, who match my particular genetic strangeness), that would be nasty for just about anyone else, and hence, never get approved by the FDA fro general use today... I am told that aspirin would never be approved today, because too many people react badly...

    Anyway, put 3-D printing together with better genetic analysis, and we can start, more and more, to tell the FDA and the medical establishment to shove it where the sun don't shine! And that one is HUGE!!!!

  • Echospinner||

    I am not sure about the connection between 3-d printing and chemical, let alone biologic drugs. Chemical bonds and molecular structure and function are not the plastic models we played with in organic chemistry class. Genetic engineering is already advancing. Different technologies.

    Anyone can set up a lab to replicate common drugs. Heroin, fentanyl, methamphetamine, there is a demand for those. If anyone wants to sell rouge Humira they could try.

  • SQRLSY One||

    On a related topic, if you want to help drug tech (fabbing custom protein molecules, some of them using amino acids not found in Earth organisms), then go here...

    https://boinc.berkeley.edu/ and install "BOINC" and supporting apps on your PC, to devote spare PC cycles (of the many choices offered) to this chosen app under BOINC:

    https://boinc.bakerlab.org/ "You don't have to be a scientist to do science.

    By simply running a free program, you can help advance research in medicine, clean energy, and materials science."

    I do this... If you don't like cranking your PC to the max (and kicking up the fan speeds to make more noise), then you can dial back the CPU power. Go to top menu bar in BOINC, options, computing preferences, "use at most BLAH percent of CPU time", and dial it back till fans do not scream.

  • mtrueman||

    "allowing me to use customized drugs that work for ME "

    Drugs have also been known to kill the people who take them. If they are of your own manufacture and haven't been tested, the risk only increases.

  • Remember to keep it all polit||

    I said nothing about being no cost or no price, or replacing daily life with technology, whatever that means. I said that

    (1) as work and play devolve more into virtual activities, such as travel, it is harder and harder for the government to control them;

    (2) as 3D printing gets better and better, government will have less and less control over even physical goods. If 90% of a household's purchases are generic chemicals to feed 3D printers, the government can't stop manufacturing forbidden things, such as guns or internal combustion engines;

    (3) we will eventually have non-invasive blood and toilet analyzers which will provide instructions to 3D printers to make the pills which will cure your brand new cancer or other ills, and the government will not be able to control it. Beyond that are recreational drugs of your choice, memory enhancement, who knows what.

    As for "those who keep it going will expect to be paid", yes, so what? Farmers still expect to be paid, but their work is so automated that food is dirt cheap. So will manufacturing be cheap, especially when so much of it is programs for 3D printers. Most manufacturing jobs will continue to be replaced by automation, same as with farming. Other jobs will spring up to replace them. This is known and welcome, not scary.

  • mtrueman||

    "(1) as work and play devolve more into virtual activities, such as travel, it is harder and harder for the government to control them;"

    Government is about controlling people. People scattered around the world speaking foreign languages, spending and earning foreign money are difficult to control. It's much easier to control and surveil them if they stay put and confine their activities to online.

    "So will manufacturing be cheap, especially when so much of it is programs for 3D printers."

    I imagine self-driving cars will be a larger, earlier disruption. Driving of various sorts make up the largest form of employment for unskilled men. The family car will also be a thing of the past. Self driving promoters like Uber and Google see themselves as the owners of the cars and the rest of us will rent their services. I don't see much of a path to freedom and autonomy here.

  • Vernon Depner||

    That should work for ASCAP and BMI agents, too.

  • mtrueman||

    "No government can control that future."

    Those who own the software can control the future.

  • Robert||

    Were you stoned when you wrote that? Fun.

  • Remember to keep it all polit||

    Early morning brain dump. Ate something which woke me up early. Fun for me too :-)

  • Juice||

    Here's an interesting Tom Woods Show episode on the topic.

    The Professor Everybody Shuns

  • Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland||

    We have all heard that Republicans are outnumbered 10-1 or 100-1 in academia, if there are any at all, matched by political donations by university zip codes.

    That is a silly assertion even without taking into account the hundreds of third- and fourth-rate colleges and universities controlled by conservatives and featuring conservative faculties. That conservative-controlled campuses tend to be low-quality, censorship-shackled goober factories, and that conservative faculty members tend to be mediocre scholars by modern academic standards, does not mean those schools and faculty members should not be considered.

    The liberal-libertarian mainstream dominates the strongest schools in America, but conservatives have plenty of weak schools from wish to choose if they prefer right-wing dogma to reason, science, and modernity.

  • Fancylad||

    The liberal-libertarian mainstream dominates the strongest schools in America
    Lol what?
    "Vegan lions dominate African steppe ecosystems".

  • Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland||

    Berkeley, Columbia, Michigan, Harvard, Penn, Yale, Princeton, Wellesley, Reed, Williams

    v.

    Hillsdale, Biola, Regent, Grove City, Liberty, Franciscan, Ave Maria, Ozarks, Brigham Young, Ouachita Baptist

    Carry on, clingers. Just be grateful your betters were gracious enough to provide accreditation to sketchy, nonsense-teaching, fourth-tier, censorship-shackled, conservative-controlled campuses.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Luckily, accreditation does not equate to better education.

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Nor does it equate to smarter or more successful people.

  • Last of the Shitlords||

    We need a civil war to get rid of everyone like you Arty. Marxists have no right to exist. My individual freedoms are worth more than the lives of every Marxist on this planet.

  • Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland||

    Your shambling resentment of your betters is somewhat understandable.

  • JSinAZ||

    Change your deodorant and wash those goddamn sweaters, you still reek of catpiss. Fuck, do you boomers even know how much you stink inside and out?

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Out of the ashes of the Democratic Party will come a chance for Libertarians to be the major ideology vs the GOP.

    What's not to like about Libertarianism?
    No drug laws
    Fiscal Conservativism
    NAP
    No neo-Conservatism
    Strong Property Rights
    Strong Constitution Originalism
    Maximum Freedom under Rule of Law
    Strong Free Market principles
    ....

  • Remember to keep it all polit||

    I like your optimistic attitude, but the GOP has so scrambled itself over Trump that there is no telling what it will be like after him. The Democrats will have to elect Occasional Cortex before they have their own metamorphosis.

    My thinking is that when Trump departs the political scene, the remnants of the GOP will be like Tim Cook after Steve Jobs; he has learned to ape the appearance without understanding the substance. So there will be a lot of populists aping his policies without having any understanding of what got him elected. The GOP will take a few years of floundering before some new rising star sets them on a new path.

    Hillary is a poor imitation of that metamorphosis for the Democrats. She had power to push out Bernie and shove her way to the front of the queue; but she was not populist enough to outguess Trump.

    Will Occasional Cortex and her ilk be those rising stars? I think they are more like Tim Cook, aping Bernie without understanding what made him so popular. The Democrats are going to have to flounder a while longer.

    Ten or twenty years from now, the two parties will have remade themselves and bear little resemblance to any current or former versions. Maybe libertarians will influence them, maybe not. It's all a steel cage match with doors wide open.

  • LarryA||

    What's not to like about Libertarianism?

    There are lots of folks who would answer:

    You have to take responsibility for the consequences of your actions
    You can't make your neighbor quit doing what you disapprove of
    You can't make your neighbor do what you think he should be doing
    If you want something, or even if you really, really think you need something, you have to work for it
    If something you want isn't for sale, you can't have it
    If you want to sell something, you can't make people pay for it
    You can't stop your neighbor from selling your product for less and out-competing you
    ...
  • Echo Chamber||

    I want to live in that universe
    *kicks stone, mutters about "progress" and kids these days, sobs in beer*

  • loveconstitution1789||

    Libertarianism or BUST!

  • Donald Trump||

    You can forget about attracting any blacks to your movement. They're too stupid and alot of them are faggots. Just look at any country run by blacks.
    Total shitholes. Don't monkey around trying to get the blacks to vote for you.

  • DiegoF||

    Mr. Trump, please rethink our approach to trade policy. A tactical "war" is OK if we win it, but your rhetoric seems often to suggest that you genuinely consider actions like those of China to be "unfair" to us, and a long-term protectionist policy toward them to be inherently good for our economy. Please also reconsider your "libertarian" FDA chief Scott Gottlieb; he is essentially an Obama holdover in friendly clothing.

  • lap83||

    This parody is too subtle

  • Echospinner||

    Waddya mean paradies.

    You gotta parados I gotta paradies. Same pants.

  • Fancylad||

    Looks like Hihn is back, but this time he's trying "parody".

  • SQRLSY One||

    "Today, the "African Students For Liberty" Facebook page has more than 5,000 followers..."

    How long till Facebook shuts them down for foisting off "fake news"?

    You know, the idea that Government Almighty does NOT love me, Government Almighty loves Government Almighty?

    That is "fake news"!!!!!

  • DiegoF||

    Those "African Students for Liberty" are likely Black Russians.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    Students and professors who dissent from leftist orthodoxy often keep their views to themselves, for fear of suffering social or reputational harm. That can make it difficult for libertarians to identify each other.

    There is that one bathroom in the lower level of the library. You know, the one with the liberty hole in the stall.

  • Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland||

    Most genuine libertarians have been burned so often by faux libertarians (right-wingers masquerading in crappy libertarian drag for various reasons) that they could be expected to naturally avoid attempts to find other "libertarians."

  • JSinAZ||

    Why do shitty leftists wear their reek like a badge? To house each louse, tick and chigger in a manner most familiar and shared with their parasitic free loader host, that's why.

    Go soak in some gasoline, you aircraft carrier to typhus fleas.

  • lap83||

    Is that what they use to pass rolled up copies of the constitution to each other?

  • Robert||

    By the late '70s, Students for a Libertarian Society and the Libertarian Party's Young Libertarian Alliance had come into being to promote cross-campus organization among pro-liberty students. These organizations died off during the 1980s, however, partly due to tactical disagreements between their purist and pragmatic wings. For the next two decades, there was essentially no national libertarian group involved in student organizing—until McCobin came along.


    "Essentially", huh? In the 1980s & at least well into the 1990s, the Libertarian Student Ass'n, begun at NYU, had chapters at other colleges & even some HSs.

  • Rev. Arthur L. Kirkland||

    libertarian organizations such as . . . . Americans for Prosperity

    No wonder (1) right-wingers can't get respect at our strongest schools and (2) "libertarians" are reduced to dreamy debates about whether their candidates for elected office will finish a distant second rather than the usual third (or fourth, or fifth).

  • Sevo||

    Lefty assholes, OTOH, cream their jeans dreaming of packing the SCOTUS.

  • JSinAZ||

    That filthy lefty fuckface only dreams of scratching less, what with it's pernicious scabies problem and all. The public library with the computer does not have a delousing station.

  • Don't look at me!||

    ...make it difficult for libertarians to identify each other.
    Why do we need to do that?

  • DiegoF||

    "We" LOL. Someone delusional has never been taught the handshake.

  • SQRLSY One||

    Whatever you do, do NOT let ANYONE know about our secret decoder rings!

  • Fancylad||

    When you're in a public washroom, tap your foot repeatedly in a separated rhythmic pattern.
    This action says "Hello friend, I am a libertarian".
    A positive response to the tapping would be a much slower rhythmic tapping translated to "Well hello to you too, I am also a libertarian and would be interested in discussing libertarian issues with you."

  • DiegoF||

    many conservatives aren't interested in discussion either. [...] The Trump era has exposed the conservative movement—young and old—as much too willing to embrace populism, protectionism, and political incorrectness

    Oh heavens no!!!

    The right, meanwhile, occasionally makes overtures to libertarians; young conservatives tend to be much more in step with libertarians on issues such as drug legalization and gay marriage.

    You know, back in the bad, medieval old days I used to float some pro-liberty ideas among some very, very hardcore socons--we're talking Traditionalist Catholics here and so forth. And it may shock some folks to know just how positive the reaction was to our ideas on drug legalization--particularly once it was made clear that we believe in personal responsibility for your decisions, not in letting druggies sit around mooching off of everyone--and marriage--once it was made clear that we believe in making it a private matter for each faith community, rather than having government politicians define it according to the political trends of the day.

  • DiegoF||

    ...Of course, maybe some folks were right to ignore these Christian Taliban types I was hanging out with. They were not, after all, "socially liberal," and what is libertarianism if not that? I am glad the other guys forged such lasting ties with the crowd who have since proven to be such valuable allies on "noneconomic issues" like free speech, due process, demographic tribalism, guns, the environment, and consumer freedom. And definitely nothing like churchmarms, science deniers, historical revisionists, or religious fundamentalists like the nasty crowd I was cultivating relationships with.

  • Trollificus||

    Dude! TMI!!

    Just let people do what they've done for 50 years and MAKE UP "what those damn religious conservatives are like". I mean, if you can't just decide what they are like and what they think, you may run into inconsistencies in your narrative.

    Look to Rev Artie, or, better yet, anyone in the intersectional wing of progressivenessity. They can be confident all their assertions are correct and reality matches their beliefs because THEY DEFINE THE TERMS: All whites have privilege, all blacks have traits a, b, and c, all LGBTs are offended by x,y, and z, women are oppressed equally throughout history and all over the globe, etc. And thereby are they granted logical certainty and moral superiority.

    The only way to get an admirably smmmmooooth narrative like they've got is to make all the terms and definitions up to fit.

  • Cy||

    As long as the big G gets to write blank checks to universities, the left will continue to grow.

  • Sevo||

    And cover the salaries and benefits to primary and secondary school teachers; they luv them some G!

  • Sevo||

    OT:
    That "Unbelievable Company Disrupting a $200 Billion Dollar Industry" looks like it has thousands of employees; every set of mug shots is another group of people.

  • Eddy||

    You're getting the ad, too, eh?

    In my version, the "company officers" seem to be hanging out a lot on street corners. Are they trying to be gritty and urban, or were they simply evicted from their offices?

  • Vernon Depner||

    And conservatives are often no less inclined to harness shutdown tactics than their counterparts on the left: Jordan Peterson, a Canadian psychology professor whose war on political correctness has made him the philosopher king of the young right, occasionally threatens to sue his critics for defamation.

    Occasionally talking about suing critics for defamation is equivalent to mobs physically preventing people from speaking? Really, Robby?

  • Gilbert Martin||

    No the right is not no less inclined to to and prevent free speech than the left.

    That's just more of Robby's nonsense about there being little difference between the left and right.

    The left on College campuses has done far more to shut down speakers they don't approve of than the right has.
    And they also have the advantage of having leftist college administrators either taking their side or refusing to punish them for the actions that would get any conservative group in big trouble if they did it.

  • Get To Da Chippah||

    Because threats of legal action are totally the same as forming a brute squad.

    /derp

  • Fancylad||

    "Suing for libel is worse than Hitler, but a public lynching for crimethink is a-okay".

  • Ron||

    trolling conservatism that seems perfectly happy to self-destruct as long as it annoys a few progressives on its way out.
    "

    I don't call it trolling when all you have to do is anounce you are conservative and will be attacked. the left can run around all day long with all their social placards making any claim they like but put on a MAGA hat and your are accused of violence. thats not tolling thats a crime by teh left

  • damikesc||

    Apparently, "trolls" run the gamut from Milo to Shapiro to Murray.

    You know who DIDN'T get hounded by trolls? Ahmedinijad.

  • damikesc||

    And conservatives are often no less inclined to harness shutdown tactics than their counterparts on the left: Jordan Peterson, a Canadian psychology professor whose war on political correctness has made him the philosopher king of the young right, occasionally threatens to sue his critics for defamation.

    So, you must support slander to be a True Libertarian?

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