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Free Minds & Free Markets

How to (Legally) Make Your Own Off-the-Books Handgun

Build a Glock 17 using parts from the internet

This article is part of Reason's special Burn After Reading issue, where we offer how-tos, personal stories, and guides for all kinds of activities that can and do happen at the borders of legally permissible behavior. Subscribe Now and get fast first class delivery of the July issue at no extra cost!

Let's start with a disclaimer: If you have little to no experience with guns, it's probably not wise to try assembling your own. It can be dangerous to make a mistake—even deadly. There's no shame in buying a firearm from a reputable manufacturer and then taking a class to learn how to handle it safely, defensively, and intelligently.

But do-it-yourself has its appeal as well. For those who already have basic firearm know-how and competence with common tools, it's easy to make a gun that's just as safe as one bought from a store.

It's also perfectly legal in most American jurisdictions. That simple fact tends to be ignored by pundits and politicians in the debate over gun control. But if even moderately skilled people can create their own weapons at home—and increasingly they can—then passing laws to regulate commercial manufacture and sale starts to look awfully futile. While firearm restrictionists will likely soon be clamoring for laws to rein in private production, there's only so much they can do: Communicating instructions for how to build a gun is constitutionally protected speech, after all.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

In celebration of the First Amendment, let's walk through how to make a weapon based on one of the most popular semi-automatic handguns in the world: the Glock 17, a full-size double-stack 9 mm pistol with a track record of reliability and simplicity. Recently, third-party companies began marketing "frame kits" that allow private individuals to make guns that look and operate like Glocks and are compatible with Glock parts. There's a caveat, however: Their product includes excess plastic that, unless removed, prevents you from turning it into a functional weapon. By itself, the object they sell doesn't count as a firearm in the eyes of the law. Instead, it is colloquially known as an "80 percent frame" or an "80 percent receiver."

This will be the platform for our homemade gun.

How Is This Legal?

Guns are regulated in various ways. The same is not true for an object that happens to be transformable into a gun by a skilled home hobbyist.

Despite the name, though, the difference between a gun and such an unregulated object isn't as clear-cut as some sort of "80 percent rule," says attorney Mark Barnes, a D.C. lawyer who specializes in issues involving the import, export, and manufacture of firearms. "The fact of the matter is that firearms design differs from gun to gun. As a consequence, the final judge on whether or not a physical object constitutes the frame or receiver of a firearm is the Firearms and Ammunition Technology Division of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives" (ATF).

If you send ATF an object, the bureau's experts will explain why it is or isn't a firearm according to two main laws. The Gun Control Act of 1968 defines a firearm as "any weapon…which will or is designed to or may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive," or "the frame or receiver of any such weapon." The National Firearms Act, meanwhile, says the frame/receiver is the "part of a firearm which provides housing for the hammer, bolt or breechblock and firing mechanism, and which is usually threaded at its forward portion to receive the barrel."

Eighty percent receivers are incapable, out of the box, of accepting a slide or trigger assembly. Turning one into a working gun takes some amount of drilling, filing, or millwork. As a result, ATF does not consider them to be firearms, and they can be bought outside the bureaucratic system that governs firearm sales.

Federal law demands that all commercial firearm purchases go through a registered Federal Firearms License (FFL) holder. Guns produced and sold by FFLs must be stamped with serial numbers, and the dealer must keep records of all sales.

Those restrictions apply to commercial transactions. But private individuals are allowed to make their own guns, Barnes explains, "as long as they aren't prohibited under federal, state, or local law from accessing, transporting, or receiving firearms." If you are not a licensed dealer, in other words, you can most likely purchase an 80 percent frame, remove the excess material, add a few parts, and turn it into a functional gun. No questions asked, no government paperwork, no background checks.

This is where the 80 percent Glock models shine. The frame kit and all other necessary parts can be legally ordered on the internet. Because the frame is made of polymer, hand tools will be enough to get the job done. You don't need an expensive computer numerical control mill or drill press—just a Dremel or similar automatic rotary device, a set of files, and some sandpaper.

After having their designs reviewed by ATF, companies such as Polymer80 and Lone Wolf released some of the first unfinished frames for the full-size Glock 17 and compact Glock 19. Typically, their designs include a few improvements over stock Glock frames, including a different grip angle, texture, and attachment system. For our build, we went with a Polymer80 PF940v2 purchased from Brownells.com. We also bought a complete Gen 3 Glock 17 slide and barrel assembly and a Glock lower parts kit (including trigger assembly) on eBay.

Who Might Want To Do This?

Gun sales typically soar when people have reason to fear that laws governing who can legally obtain different types of weapons are about to get more stringent. Following the Valentine's Day school shooting in South Florida, there was an uptick in anti-gun rhetoric. Firearm sales the following month broke the previous March record by a quarter-million.

And those are only the sales tracked through the FBI's National Criminal Background Check System. As worries over potential bans or even confiscations rise, some feel the urge to leave as small a paper trail as possible regarding their personal weapons.

The easiest way to avoid government attention is to purchase your gun from a private seller. Most states minimally regulate such transactions, leaving Americans free to buy firearms from each other without much interference. But a secondary-market weapon is still marked with a serial number that can be traced back to the original owner, which means there is a path eventually leading to you.

If paper trails are your biggest worry, you may be thinking of grinding the serial number off a gun you purchase. This is a felony. Do not do this.

A better way to fly under the radar is to make the gun yourself. Firearms produced by individuals outside the FFL system don't require a serial number under federal law.

(Note that states may nonetheless require one. For example, California in 2017 mandated that all "ghost guns," or guns made by nontraditional manufacturers, be registered and have a serial number added to them. This will probably be hard to enforce. Still, you should be sure you know what laws are on the books in your state before going down this road.)

To remain anonymous, you'll need to buy the unfinished frame and other parts with cash. It's doable, but it's likely to be a pain in the ass. Instead, most people shop online.

The internet has ushered in a golden age for small arms. It's easier than ever to learn about guns, purchase parts, and find places to train to use your weapon. If you want to know it or buy it, it's out there, thanks to the web. It's actually slightly more expensive to acquire the unfinished frame and parts to assemble a Glock yourself than it is to purchase one readymade, but everything you need is available at your fingertips.

The downside of credit cards and shipping addresses is that there will be a record in some form of what you buy. In the event of a ban (or if law enforcement has some reason to take an interest in you), the receipts can be subpoenaed.

Nothing is totally foolproof, but adding an extra layer of complexity to slow attempts by outsiders to locate your weapons might be worth it to you. For this experiment, we purchased all our parts on the internet. They were shipped directly to us, with no FFL middleman and no government registration.

Your home-crafted gun may not work as well as a factory Glock—though, with care and some modifications, it could work even better—but if you value privacy over price and don't mind a bit of tinkering, this could be a solution for you.

How To Finish the Frame and Assemble the Gun

To finish your gun from 80 percent, you'll need to remove the excess polymer that prevents the slide and trigger assembly from being attached. (The slide we used came already assembled, as did the trigger assembly.)

The frame is shipped with a jig—a device that holds the object you are working on and guides the tools you're using on it—that helps with sanding and drilling. Extending above the jig are the parts of the frame we'll be sanding off—we'll call them "tabs"—which are labeled on the jig with the word "remove." Most unfinished polymer frames are finished in a similar manner. Consult the instructions if you choose another model.

I am not, nor is anyone at Reason, a professional armorer or gunsmith—just an interested amateur who used the following techniques to make a usable weapon at home.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

TOOLS YOU WILL NEED:

  • A Dremel or other rotary tool with a sanding drum
  • A set of metal files
  • Coarse and fine-grit sandpaper (we used 100-, 800-, and 1,200-grit)
  • WD-40 and a firearm lubricant such as RemOil or Ballistol
  • A hammer (preferably nylon, rather than metal, so as not to mar the frame)
  • A flathead screwdriver
  • A bench vise (optional but helpful)
  • A power drill (optional; your rotary tool may be substituted)

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Assemble the needed supplies (Figure 1). Using a vise, secure the frame in the jig and make sure it is level. Optionally, tape the ends of the jig to ensure minimal movement of the frame.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Using the Dremel and the sanding drum attachment, start to sand down the polymer tabs marked for removal (Figure 2). Be very careful. While you can use the Dremel for the entire process, it is much easier to make a mistake that way. Use the Dremel for most of the heavy lifting. In the next step, you'll continue the sanding by hand for a more precise and smooth result.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Once the majority of the material has been removed from all four tabs, use hand files to smooth the remaining material (Figure 3). Be sure not to go too far into the frame. The files should be used to remove the material in the corners that the sanding drum can't reach.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

While the frame is still in the jig, drill the holes for the trigger assembly and rear slide rails (Figure 4). The exact placement and drill-bit sizes for these holes are marked on the jig. Use the supplied drill bits in either a hand drill or the Dremel for this step. It is important that you take your time, making sure to drill a perfectly straight hole.

When drilling, do not go through the entire frame from one side. Instead, alternate drilling on each side until you feel the drill bit break through the polymer. Use a sharp blade or a small file to clean up the holes on the inside of the frame.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Using the Dremel or a round file, remove the excess polymer from the guide rod channel (Figure 5). There's a U-shaped mark on the polymer indicating which section is to be removed. Like before, be cautious and take your time.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

After drilling the holes for the trigger assembly, you can begin the final round of sanding (Figure 6). Start by spraying a small amount of WD-40 on coarse-grit sandpaper for a wet-sand effect. Going slowly to make sure you don't bite into the frame, sand off any polymer that remains where the tabs were, cleaning up the plastic burrs that may still be attached to the frame. Once the tabs are totally flush with the rest of the frame, use the fine-grit sandpaper with WD-40 for a polished effect.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Now you're ready to start assembling the frame. Install the slide lock by inserting the slide lock spring into the top of the frame. Using a flathead screwdriver, depress the spring and push the slide lock into the channel on the side of the frame above the spring (Figure 7). The small lip on the slide lock should face toward the rear of the frame.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

To install the magazine catch, insert the magazine catch spring through the top of the frame and into the channel at the font of the magwell (i.e., the hollow space inside the grip that will accept the magazine). Push the magazine catch in through the side of the frame. With your flathead screwdriver, pull the top of the magazine catch spring away from the frame, allowing the magazine catch to slide underneath. Use the screwdriver to guide the magazine catch spring into the slot on the magazine release (Figure 8).

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Insert the front and rear slide rails into the frame (Figure 9). Using a hammer, tap them into place (Figure 10).

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Insert the trigger assembly into the rear of the frame (Figure 11).

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Using a hammer, drive in the trigger housing pin, the P80 front rail pin, and the locking block pin (Figure 12).

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Insert the slide stop lever. The U-shaped spring should rest underneath the locking block pin, and the hole should line up with the trigger pin hole (Figure 13). Drive in the trigger pin.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

The frame is ready to accept a slide assembly (Figure 14). Lubricate the rails and attach the slide to them (Figure 15). They may need some additional polishing or filing to allow the slide to move freely.

Todd KraininTodd Krainin

Inspect the frame and slide, ensuring everything functions properly before firing, as you would with any new firearm.

Congrats! You're now the owner of an off-the-books handgun.


This article is part of Reason's special Burn After Reading issue, where we offer how-tos, personal stories, and guides for all kinds of activities that can and do happen at the borders of legally permissible behavior.

Photo Credit: Todd Krainin

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  • nosaer||

    How much did all of the parts cost? If I could save 20% off of retail this would interest me.

  • Brendan||

    For the 1st one, you're probably paying more than retail.

    The point isn't so much cost cutting, but anonymity and the various things/feelings some people get from DIY projects.

  • nosaer||

    Thanks Brendan. How much then would the savings be on the second one?

  • a tandem||

    Like building gup your own bicycle or anything, the issue is not really the savings, it is knowing the tool or device a lot better by building it yourself

  • Brendan||

    For the 1st one, you're probably paying more than retail.

    The point isn't so much cost cutting, but anonymity and the various things/feelings some people get from DIY projects.

  • Brendan||

    For the 1st one, you're probably paying more than retail.

    The point isn't so much cost cutting, but anonymity and the various things/feelings some people get from DIY projects.

  • Brendan||

    Oops, my homemade post selector switch was set to 3rd burst.

  • perlchpr||

    Apparently, an ineffective setting for squirrels. ;)

  • DaveSs||

    Better watch for those black helicopters.

    The ATF is on the lookout for people who are in possession of an unregistered automatic poster

  • ThomasD||

    Once had a 1911 with the sear spring going bad. It would go full auto at random. One moment you'd be dropping the hammer on a good sight picture, and in a blink you'd be left wondering why the muzzle was pointing vertical, the slide was back, and the magazine was empty.

    If it doesn't have a stock (or at minimum a fore grip), you really don't want a selector switch.

  • philippes||

    Here are the approximate parts costs, which don't include the tools and time involved (everything except the frame is available on eBay [they prohibit 80% frames from being sold there]):

    $149.99 Polymer80 frame
    $200.00 Glock 17 slide
    $99.00 Glock 17 barrel
    $84.95 Glock 17 9mm slide completion kit
    $69.95 Glock 17 lower parts kit

    $603.89 Total

    Some of the above parts can be purchased with additional discounts, but I don't believe one of these can be built for less than $550.00. One can also go completely over-the-top and build a very fancy Glock clone for tons of dough.

  • Quo Usque Tandem||

    Given that you can buy a factory new Glock 17 [gen 4] from online dealers for $500 pretty much any day, the draw would be that it is a do it yourself with no background check or record trail.

  • Bubba Jones||

    $160 for the 80% lower and jig.
    Ebay has complete parts kits for about $600.

    This is not a cheaper way to get a Glock. You can get police trade ins for 1/2 that price.

    If I wanted a "ghost gun" I think I would just do a cash private party sale. That way you get a discount instead of paying a premium. And you can get something you actually want.

    The exception might be AR-15 lowers. Sellers claim you can crank one of those out in less than 2 hours, but people on the forums say it's not that simple.

  • Bubba Jones||

    Found a used 40 cal complete kit for $380. That puts you at $560 all in.

    Glock 17 or 19 online is just under $500 plus FFL fees.

    There are two reasons you might do this.
    1) the serial number
    2) you plan to replace the barrel, slide and trigger with aftermarket parts

    With a build, you don't have to buy the OEM pieces you don't actually want.

  • TxJack 112||

    A ghost gun is one that lacks a serial number. Buying a gun in a private sale eliminates the paperwork, but the lower still has a serial number. If it does not, and you are caught, both you and the seller will be arrested for illegal arms trafficking. I have no idea how long it takes to finish a polymer lower, but it takes about 2-3 hours to finish a aluminum lower for an AR, once you have the technique. The general consensus is when you first start, buy 2-3 80% lowers because you are gonna mess up the first one for sure and probably the second.

  • IceTrey||

    You can sell ghost guns privately. You just can't make one with the intention of selling it then you become a manufacturer which requires a license. Gun laws are screwy.

  • dan'o en barrel||

    Looks like the slide assembly and lower cost $540 before additional, though smaller parts. Since msrp is $600-650 I doubt this will be a bargain.

  • TxJack 112||

    An 80% lower is not considered a firearm by the ATF which is why they can be shipped to your house. It is also no illegal to make an unregistered gun provided it is for your personal use and you never attempt to sell it because it is what is commonly referred to as a ghost gun. Building a gun is easy. People think you need all kinds of sophisticated milling equipment or CNC machines but you can do it with hand tools if you take your time. This is one of the areas missed when Dems were able to pass the Assault Weapons ban in 1994. Unfortunately, Dopey Dianne was informed and she included it in her ban she introduced this time but fortunately, that bill never saw the light of day. If by some miracle Democrats managed to pass another ban, you can bet before it takes effect there will be thousands of 80% lowers sold in the US and then the Feds will have fun trying to enforce the law since there will be no way to know where these type of guns are located. Dont even talk about 3D printers. lol.

  • mikeymike||

    I don't think this is true. You just can't build it with the intent to sell. At least in the free states, it is legal to sell if you decide afterward.

  • Bubba Jones||

    Q:
    Can I build and then transfer a finished firearm to another individual?

    A:
    Yes, but you'll need to mark the firearm in accordance with 27 CFR 472.92 (formally 178.92) and follow all the laws that are in place today. Protect yourself and don't put a completed firearm in anyone's hands unless you have gone through proper channels and background checks. Following the proper channels will protect us, our family, and our friends, it's also the best way to ensure you can come back to this site again and again as you finish your project. For any firearm transfer it is your responsibility to understand the federal and local laws and how they apply.

    https://www.polymer80.com/faq

  • ThomasD||

    That regulation applies to licensed manufacturers. If you did not build it with intent to sell you are not a manufacturer, and I'm not clear that rule applies.

    Particularly since any marking you applied would have to be unique. You couldn't just stamp '0001' and call it good. You'd have to include something that marks it as coming from you, and you'd have to maintain records of the markings. IMO that runs dangerously close to declaring yourself a manufacturer.

    So that answer strike me as more CYA than anything else.

    I'd say, if you really didn't make it to sell it, then it would transfer like any other non-serialized firearm.

  • TxJack 112||

    As long as you mark it according to the ATF regulations. You cannot sell an unmarked, unregistered firearm.

  • ThomasD||

    Nonsense. I have multiple firearms that are not serialized, because they were never serialized when made. Prior to GCA 68 serial numbers were not required.

    Removing a serial number, even if pre 68 will still get you in a world of hurt.

  • 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed||

    No offense, but the legal opinions I've solicited make it clear to me at least that you are mistaken. I know that I wouldn't bother risking it.

  • dchang0||

    California has a bill to force background checks on people buying "precursor firearms parts," California Assembly Bill AB2382.

    If it passes, buying a pistol or rifle barrel would require a background check.

    I doubt it will pass; Calif. will go broke before it could effectively enforce this. But the Democrats keep trying to ban guns by a thousand tiny regulations.

  • LaszloTormes||

    Why didn't you post the video on Liveleak?

  • Fk_Censorship||

    In the next installment, can you teach us how to build woodchippers?

  • vek||

    Or unregistered helicopters...

    With those 3 tools you can deal with all of your communist problems! ;)

  • FlameCCT||

    IIUC there are already kits for building helicopters and aircraft including jets. ;-)

  • No Longer Amused||

    The after-market parts industry is awesome.

  • Thrackmoor||

    Amen! Testify!

  • Thrackmoor||

    I personally like the pour-your-own AR receiver kit. It's messy fun.

  • Fist of Etiquette||

    THERE OUGHT TO BE A LAW

  • AlmightyJB||

    Oh it's coming.

  • ThomasD||

    Seems like they should offer a discount kits for repeat customers that don't include the jig or tools since they are re-usable. Even if that only knocks $15 off the price that's still significant. Especially if you want to go all John Woo.

  • swampwiz||

    Does this include instructions on how to not care for its storage so that Junior can accidentally blow away someone?

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    You mean instructions for not being an idiot? If you know how to wipe your own ass, you can figure out how to keep your kids from getting to your guns. Even better, instill respect for guns and teach them gun safety as early as possible.

  • Zeb||

    Yup. Plenty of kids grow up with guns in the house that aren't always locked up and manage not to shoot anyone. A well adjusted child is capable of understanding that some things are serious business and you don't mess with them.

  • Red Rocks White Privilege||

    They're in the same location as the instructions on how to not care for storing your alcohol so Junior can die in a drunk driving wreck.

  • ThomasD||

    Bathtubs kill more kids every year. Never seen an owners manual for one.

  • ||

    At one time, the ideal age for a boy to be given his first real firearm, typically in .22 Long Rifle, was 7 years old. Boys would often go hunting for rabbits with no adult supervision. And both accidental shootings and boys being shot by other boys deliberately were extremely rare, almost unheard of.

    Why? Because they were taught to safely handle and respect guns. Modern treatment of gun safety is much like old time abstinence-based sex-ed -- it doesn't work. You just end up with a generation of kids that regards the topic as forbidden fruit, while simultaneously not having a single clue on how to be safe around it.

  • a tandem||

    If you are not a prior criminal, having firearms in your home makes you, correlates to your household members -- including Junior -- being less likely to be a victim or perpetrator of criminal violence, than homes with no guns.

  • ||

    It's also possible to rebuild a paintball gun to do fairly unspeakable things. And you can get .68 caliber ball bearings.

  • Delhi Escorts||

    Good tricks..

  • Pat001||

    ...it's easy to make a gun that's just as safe as one bought from a store.

    No it is not.

    Inspect the frame and slide, ensuring everything functions properly before firing, as you would with any new firearm.

    Good luck with that. Unless you're an experienced gunsmith, you won't know if "everything functions properly" until you put a live round in it and pull the trigger.

    You can buy an aftermarket kit to make a Fender Stratocaster. Looks just like the real thing but it isn't a real Stratocaster, nor does it sound like the real thing. At least it won't blow up in your hand...

  • a tandem||

    Actually they are remarkable safe. Odds are they are safer than buying used guns.

    The more you know about the function of a firearm the more likely you are to notice issues and also to maintain the firearm properly.

  • Rick Stewart||

    Some additional ways to get cheaper (factory made) Glock guns and/or parts.

    1) take a Glock Armorer course ($250). You will learn how to strip a Glock down to the plastic, and put it back together again. You will then be eligible to buy authentic parts directly from Glock, at dealer prices. This would be all parts except the plastic frames, which have serial numbers.

    2) join the Glock Sport Shooting Foundation (GSSF, $60/3 years). Every year you will receive a coupon which allows you to buy any Glock currently being sold to civilians, for Law Enforcement price. It's roughly 20 or 25% off suggested retail. [Warning! This can be habit forming! You may end up with more Glocks than you really need ... .]

  • TxJack 112||

    The simple truth is when the anti gun crowd learns anything new about what is actually possible they freak out. I remember having a debate with a woman from MA, about why someone needs 1000 rds of ammo. When I told her that on a typical weekend, my friends and I easily shoot 600-1000 rds, and that we loaded the ammo ourselves, she insisted I should be arrested and said "she would figure out how to tell the police I was making my own bullets". Of course, I laughed and told her I would be happy to give her my name and address since what I was doing was totally legal. She scoffed, but when others told her that indeed it was totally legal to load your own ammo, she has a cow. This is the same issue. When the anti-gun loons found out people were building their own ARs, they went nuts. When they find out people are finishing lowers and making actual ghost guns, they will have another cow. The bottom line is no matter the law, someone will figure out a way to get around it.

  • TxJack 112||

    The simple truth is when the anti gun crowd learns anything new about what is actually possible they freak out. I remember having a debate with a woman from MA, about why someone needs 1000 rds of ammo. When I told her that on a typical weekend, my friends and I easily shoot 600-1000 rds, and that we loaded the ammo ourselves, she insisted I should be arrested and said "she would figure out how to tell the police I was making my own bullets". Of course, I laughed and told her I would be happy to give her my name and address since what I was doing was totally legal. She scoffed, but when others told her that indeed it was totally legal to load your own ammo, she has a cow. This is the same issue. When the anti-gun loons found out people were building their own ARs, they went nuts. When they find out people are finishing lowers and making actual ghost guns, they will have another cow. The bottom line is no matter the law, someone will figure out a way to get around it.

  • Zeb||

    I need 1000 rds of ammo so that I don't have to go buy some every time I shoot and it's a lot cheaper.

  • Cyto||

    Yeah, I lament the end of cheap ammo.

    We used to go shooting a lot when I was in grad school in Birmingham Alabama. We'd pick up a box or 2 of 9mm or .45s and then get a "bucket o' bullets" of .22 lr rounds from Walmart. Maybe 2 buckets and skip the bigger rounds. I think they were about $5 or $10 for the bucket of 1000 rounds. Does anyone else remember those?

    Once the handgun rounds were finished, the real fun began. Plinking at cans in the junkyard at 50 yards with a little .22 rifle is a load of fun. I don't know if anyone gets to do this sort of thing these days, but it really should be on every kids go-to list. Unfortunately, it isn't so dirt cheap any more, and it isn't so easy to find a place where you can go shooting without paying someone.

    A quick look on the internet says that Bass Pro has a Bucket O' Bullets from remmington, $85 for 1,500 rounds. Still not too pricey, but not crazy cheap like when I was a youngster.

  • a tandem||

    Go with p320 FCG. Where FCG not lower/frame is the controlled part. Takes about an hour minutes to cut down.
    FCG as the BATFE designated "gun' is the future and this is really driving gun control nuts crazy (good!) since it shows they are losing strategically.

  • Jerryskids||

    It's also perfectly legal in most American jurisdictions.

    No, it's technically legal in most American jurisdictions. Just as it's technically legal to tell a cop to go eat a big bag of dicks. We're at the point where the de facto rule is "everything not explicitly allowed is forbidden" and if you're secretly making guns in the basement I suspect you already know this - that's exactly why you're secretly making guns in the basement.

  • Zeb||

    You can make a shotgun for about $20 of parts from a hardware store. Not exactly a precision weapon, but pretty effective.

  • Quo Usque Tandem||

    Punt gun? Those were pretty effective on dense flocks of ducks, back in the day.

  • Zeb||

    Common 3/4" iron pipe happens to be pretty much exactly the right size for a 12 ga barrel.

  • Cyto||

    And if you use it with black powder to make a makeshift canon, don't use very much powder. It can be really, really dangerous. You might accidentally blow a few branches and half the bark off of a 150 year old oak tree in your friend's back yard. And you might feel really, really lucky that you decided to put what you thought was "only a little bit" instead of the 2 or 3 inches you thought would work best.

    Uh, at least that's what I heard from... uh.. a friend.

    13 year old boys and black powder are an awesome combination. And an excellent example of how it is a wonder that any of us live long enough to breed.

  • Raymond Luxury Yach-t||

    So, how do I make an automatic?