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Kid Sues Over First Amendment Right to Second Amendment Shirt

A Nevada school district unlawfully required a student not to wear a gun rights T-shirt, according to a First Amendment lawsuit filed today in federal court.

A Nevada school district unlawfully required a student not to wear a gun rights T-shirt, according to a First Amendment lawsuit filed today in federal court.

The lawsuit says that an 8th-grade student at Kendyl Depoali Middle School in Reno was prohibited from wearing a Firearms Policy Coalition t-shirt, which included the words "Don't Tread On Me" and a coiled rattlesnake—a reference to the Revolution-era Gadsden flag—but no actual depiction of a firearm. It also included the letters "2A," meaning the Second Amendment.

Brooke May, a teacher at the school, claimed last month that the shirt violated the dress code and said the 8th-grader could have his "Second Amendment rights when [he] turns[s] eighteen," according to the complaint. The dress code prohibits "obscene" language, anything that "may be deemed a safety issue," and "anything that promotes weapons."

The student, who is named by the initials G.M. in the complaint because he is a minor, responded by covering the shirt with a sweatshirt. He has not worn it to school again.

In short, this is a First Amendment case about the Second Amendment. The groups that filed the suit hope to push back against the many public school districts that lack an appreciation for both free speech and gun rights.

In this case, the Washoe County School District does seem willing to recognize free speech—when it's anti-gun. Two months ago, as proposed anti-gun walkouts were being planned, the school district released a statement saying that "as a district, we have always placed a high value on student voice." And the district (after some initial back-and-forth) decided not to suspend a student who, during an anti-gun walkout on a school day, called the office of Rep. Mark Amodei (R–Nev.) to say, "Congresspeople who are not acting on gun control reforms need to get off their fucking asses and do something."

G.M.'s parents, Audrey and Shaun Guardanapo, work in law enforcement and are members of the Firearms Policy Coalition. After they discussed the t-shirt prohibition with school officials as a civil rights issue, and the school refused to back down, the parents asked the coalition for help.

"We believe that it's incredibly important to make sure that all viewpoints are being respected," says coalition chairman Brandon Combs. "That's why we published our guide to K-12 speech, have a Legal Action Hotline, and file cases like this—to make sure that people, including students like this 8th grader, can use their First Amendment right to defend and promote their Second Amendment rights."

Neither the school district superintendent nor the principal immediately replied to questions from Reason. The case is supported and funded by the Firearms Policy Coalition and the Firearms Policy Foundation. Eugene Volokh, Brad Benbrook, Steve Duvernay, and David O'Mara represent G.M. A request for a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction is also in the works.

Ever since the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Tinker case in 1969, it's been clear that public schools are constitutionally required to tolerate controversial and unpopular opinions as long as they're not clearly disruptive to class activities. "State-operated schools may not be enclaves of totalitarianism," the court ruled. "School officials do not possess absolute authority over their students."

Plaintiffs in the case filed today hope that the courts will remind the school district that the same rule applies. "The shirt did not promote or advocate illegal activity; it contained no violent or offensive imagery; nothing on it was obscene, vulgar, or profane," the complaint says. "Through his shirt, G.M. sought to comment on a national debate about a serious issue, and to voice support of constitutional rights, including the right to bear arms under the Second Amendment."

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  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    8th-grader could have his "Second Amendment rights when [he] turns[s] eighteen,"

    Does the March-for-our-Lives brat pack get their first amendment rights when they turn eighteen?

  • General_Tso||

    Hear, hear!

  • Juice||

    Yep, and until then they'll march when they're told to. For their lives.

  • Just Say'n||

    "Both sides, guys. Both sides" he insisted as he was led away to the gulag. "Sure, I'm going to the gulag for thought crimes, but the other guys had Milo. Remember that? I mean come on." As he entered the camp he was greeted with jeers from the other prisoners. "They're all Nazis, anyways" he said in response to the reception he received. "I mean why else are they in a gulag? Clearly they're just Nazis." During lunch time, as he sat alone ostracized by his fellow inmates, someone threw gruel at him which clung to his perfectly groomed hair. "Do you know how long it takes to get gruel out of my finely moosed hair?" He asked us.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    At least they will have a cute little pug to play with.

  • Iheartskeet||

    "To be sure..."

  • Wizard4169||

    "Moosed hair"? What, does he style it into antlers or something?

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    G.M.'s parents, Audrey and Shaun Guardanapo

    Great, nice DOXXING, tReason!

  • ||

    But remember, an alleged lesbian rapist and her remorseful partners deserve full anonymity under the law because sex can be a troubling issue for some people.

  • The Metonymy||

    They're cops.

  • Vernon Depner||

    Another argument for school uniforms.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    If we are serious about equality, we should require uniforms for everything.

  • Vernon Depner||

    Equality for children? Sorry, I can't go that far. I know there are those who do.

  • Sometimes a Great Notion||

    If I have to wear a state issued uniform does that get me qualified immunity?

  • Hugh Akston||

    "You can have your First Amendment rights when you turn eighteen."

  • Vernon Depner||

    That seems reasonable to me.

  • Hugh Akston||

    I have no doubt that it does since it affects people who aren't you.

  • Vernon Depner||

    How far do you want to go with this? Should children be allowed to sign contracts? Vote? Travel unaccompanied as soon as they can walk? Have sex with adults?

    Children being told by parents or those who parents have put in authority over them when they may or may not exercise certain rights strikes me as not only desirable but necessary.

  • leninsmummy||

    1. Do you not see a double standard in supporting 1st amendment rights for students who want to do away with the 2nd amendment and not supporting them for an pro 2nd amendment t-shirt?

    2. The bill of rights is not about having sex with adults. Do teenagers have the right to trial by jury? To privacy from the state in their papers?? To a speedy trial??? These are all BASIC rights of people living in a free country.

  • Vernon Depner||

    1. Yes, I do. That's why I advocate not allowing students to engage in any political activities during school hours. Requiring uniforms and thereby not allowing garments with political messages of any kind is one way of enforcing that.

  • Vernon Depner||

    2. The bill of rights is not about having sex with adults.

    The federal courts have repeatedly struck down laws regulating adult sexual behavior on constitutional grounds. Were children recognized as fully equal under the law, it would be consistent to grant adult sexual freedom to them as well.

    Do teenagers have the right to trial by jury?

    No. Almost all teenage offenders are processed in the juvenile justice system. In the case of heinous crimes, prosecutors in most states can ask the court to try a juvenile in the adult system, but that request can be denied, and the juvenile's attorney will certainly fight it. In any case, the juvenile offender himself has no say in the matter.

    To privacy from the state in their papers?

    No, not if their parents decide to share their papers with the state.

    To a speedy trial?

    See above. They rarely get trials, and when they do, it's because a judge decided that's in the best interest of the state, not because it's in the interest of the offender.

    These are all BASIC rights of people living in a free country.

    Those are all basic rights of adults living in a free country. Every society, anywhere, ever, has recognized that childhood is a unique form of disability that requires children to be given accommodations and to suffer restrictions for their own well-being.

  • BigChiefWahoo||

    Minors can enter into contracts now. But they are given the option of revoking them, so other people are reluctant to enter into contracts with minors.

    Until what age are minors (by law) prohibited from traveling alone?

  • Vernon Depner||

    Until what age are minors (by law) prohibited from traveling alone?

    I don't have individual statutes at my fingertips, but I'll guarantee that if your 4-year-old is denied service at the ticket window at the bus station, his lawsuit against the bus company for violating his rights won't get very far.

    A contract that can be unilaterally revoked without consequence is no contract.

  • Bruce D||

    The question is how old is a "minor". A good case could be made that 16 should be the legal age.

  • Vernon Depner||

    A better case could be made that 24 should be the legal age.

  • Cloudbuster||

    Then why haven't Emma Gonzalez and David Hogg been silenced yet?

  • Vernon Depner||

    Because I don't run their school? If I did, they would not be engaging in political actions during school hours. What they did and said on their own time would be up to them and their parents.

  • ||

    Would you say that for all civil rights for those under eighteen? It might be logical to treat them like a fetus with no rights. Seriously, I doubt if that's what you mean.

    Sticking to 1st amendment only, would children under eighteen have the right to religion?

  • Vernon Depner||

    Obviously there's no way to enforce what people actually believe, but parents should have the right to require, permit, or forbid minor children to engage in religious practices. As a practical matter, trying to force an unwilling and unbelieving adolescent to go through the motions of practicing a faith is going to be very difficult, so I wouldn't recommend it.

  • Marcus Aurelius||

  • STSA||

    Having gone to a school with school uniforms, I do not recommend it. At my school the uniform was blue jeans and a blue shirt for most years, brown shirt for the last two years. It was horrible, everyone looks the same except that the uniform fits some people better than others. Then you get drama because some girls can afford designer blue jeans while others are wearing crap jeans. Worst of all, it feels like being in prison, you're no longer allowed to express your individuality through fashion, and finding your clique is harder because everyone looks the same.

    School uniforms undermine individualism, which is lacking in this country. Suffice to say, they're a bad idea.

  • Gaear Grimsrud||

    School uniforms undermine individualism, which is lacking in this country. Suffice to say, they're a bad idea.

    Agreed.

  • Hugh Akston||

    School uniforms undermine individualism

    That seems reasonable to Vernon Derpner.

  • Paloma||

    Puerto Ricans are pretty individualistic. And the students all wear uniforms.

  • Sevo||

    "Agreed."
    + several

  • Cyto||

    As a student I agreed with that.

    As a parent.... school uniforms are great. Not for any issues of expression or uniformity.... they just make getting 3 kids out the door much easier. "What are you going to wear" suddenly goes away. The kids express themselves by wearing really wild socks.

    My youngest is a complete fashionista. Getting her out the door if she had a full range of choices would be nigh impossible some days. As it is, she sometimes spends 10 minutes or more switching headbands and socks.

    As a student those might sound like stupid reasons. But for parents trying to get to work on time, it is a pretty nice benefit.

  • Cyto||

    But I agree that your blue shirt / blue jeans uniform kinda sucked.

    Our kids get a choice of red, white or blue tennis shirt and tan or blue khaki shorts or pants, or skirt, jumper dress or tennis dress as appropriate. So there's a bit of choice.

    One daughter won't wear a skirt or dress. The other only wears dresses and skirts. And our son won't wear long pants... ever. Even when it gets down below 60 degrees.... (That's what counts for cold in south Florida)
    And he only wears tall socks in loud colors. So they kinda have their own style.

    My only complaint is that they have the white shirt as a choice. Keeping that even remotely close to clean with elementary school kids is just a losing battle.

  • Paloma||

    Blue shirts and blue jeans sounds kind of like a prison uniform. And brown shirts for two years? We've seen enough brown shirts in colleges.

  • Azathoth!!||

    Benefit.

    Look at what that 'benefit' has aided.

    Look at the little brownshirts our children are becoming.

    Do you really think 'you can express your creativity/individuality via the State ordered avenues' can EVER be a good thing?

  • Spookk||

    Best way to deal with kids and school is to not have any so he govt doesn't have that handle on you. there's the added benefit of huge amounts of money laying around for you to spend on stuff you actually want to, enjoy, etc, too.

  • Vernon Depner||

    Expressing your individuality should be very low on the list of priorities at school. School should be mostly about listening rather than expressing yourself.

  • Bruce D||

    School should be 100% without exception about learning to think for oneself. Anything else is completely invalid.

  • epsilon given||

    I would propose that it's not the uniform that destroys individuality. It's the school.

    We should get rid of schools altogether (the State-run ones, at least), and then let parents decide for themselves how children should best express their individuality.

  • ThomasD||

    " it's not the uniform that destroys individuality. It's the school."

    So says the goth kid.

    Strict uniforms kinda suck/not suck. But the only people they prevent from demonstrating their individuality are the utter morons, everyone else finds a way.

    I'm more ok with a uniform dress standard, e.g. pants/jeans/slacks & shirts/tops/blouses in a defined range of colors with no visible text or added embellishment. Brand apparel is ok so long as the symbols/lettering is no larger than one inch high. That gives the students enough avenue for individuality while also keeping things easy for the parents. And the schools/taxpayers don't get sucked into fights over viewpoint discrimination.

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    "Through his shirt, G.M. sought to comment on a national debate about a serious issue, and to voice support of constitutional rights, including the right to bear arms under the Second Amendment."

    It's also possible it was the first thing he grabbed because everything else was in the laundry and Mom hadn't folded any of his clean clothes yet.

  • josh||

    "It's also possible it was the first thing he grabbed because everything else was in the laundry and Mom hadn't folded any of his clean clothes yet."

    They should include that in the brief.

  • Chipper Morning Baculum||

    Does the 1st Amendment cover the 2nd Amendment? Can a large group of armed people peacefully assemble and march on Washington?

  • Diane Reynolds (Paul.)||

    Yes they can. And imagine how 'hands off' the cops would be if a large, armed crowd marched on Washington.

    Oh wait, I don't have to imagine.

  • Vernon Depner||

    Yes. It was called the Battle of Fort Stevens.

  • creech||

    +1 Pot shot at Lincoln.

  • Marcus Aurelius||

    +1 high crime

  • Bubba Jones||

    California state Capitol close enough?

    http://www.sacbee.com/news/loc.....67224.html

  • Longtobefree||

    No.
    Because the constitution does not apply in the district.
    And, oh by the way, both Virginia and Maryland will stop them and arrest them for exercising their constitutional rights.

  • croaker||

    Maryland yes, Virginia no. Not even Arlington, they learned their lesson when state law was changed 20 years ago.

  • Rich||

    How about a shirt saying something like "Nice little school district ya got here. Be a shame if something happened to its federal funding."

  • Alcibiades||

    K-12 public schools bound by the Constitution punishing a student for promoting a core constitutional right.

    Washoe County School District; prepare to be schooled and put in your place.

  • colorblindkid||

    No public school before high school should have anything to do with walkouts and political protests during school hours, and no public school teachers anywhere should lead their students on political campaigns during school hours. It is straight up brainwashing, and bullying. You think a student who disagrees is going to feel comfortable saying no to their teacher and the angry mob at school? No. They would be bullied and shamed into joining, which leads to this kind of shit to begin with.

  • croaker||

    Kids in a high school in Bethlethem NY got detention for the 4/20 walkout. The principal was a pussy. Had that been me, I would have said "don't bother coming back, the contents of your lockers will be on the sidewalk."

  • Vernon Depner||

    That's a little harsh. The punishment should be the same as for any other unexcused absence.

  • Ken Shultz||

    "The student . . . responded by covering the shirt with a sweatshirt. He has not worn it to school again."

    He should wear the "2A" t-shirt to school again, and when the teacher makes him put his sweatshirt on again, to cover it up, he should have a sweatshirt ready that reads, "My teacher is an idiot".

  • IJustWorkHere||

    When my dad was a junior in high school, he met with his guidance counselor, who said to him: "You know your grades aren't very good and no good college program is going to accept you, so I'm not sure what options you have when you graduate. What are you going to do?"

    He told him he was planning to be a guidance counselor.

  • Paloma||

    Perfect answer. And your dad was still way too smart to be a guidance counselor.

  • tokyokv||

    Guidance counselors now think that EVERYBODY MUST ATTEND COLLEGE. In capital letters.

  • Vernon Depner||

    If they don't go to college, they might take Grandpa's job.

  • ThomasD||

    I remember to this day the time when my high school guidance counselor sorta politely tried to explain to me that I wasn't college material. A truly valuable day in my life.

    High school teaches you a lot. Just maybe not what they think they are teaching.

  • Bubba Jones||

    My high school banned spuds Mackenzie shirts.

    I was sad.

  • Juice||

    I got sent home in 6th grade because I had on a T-shirt that said "Bourbon Street" because it said Bourbon.

  • Rich||

    Maybe it was because you can rearrange to spell "Brunette Boors"?

  • Paloma||

    Not enough R's

  • VinniUSMC||

    Not enough R's

    Look again.

    Bourbon Street

    Brunette Boors

  • ||

    Brooke May, a teacher at the school, claimed last month that the shirt violated the dress code and said the 8th-grader could have his "Second Amendment rights when [he] turns[s] eighteen,"

    God how I wish the kid would've told her she could pry the t-shirt from his cold, dead hands.

  • Rich||

    And then "Bad touch, Mommy! BAD TOUCH!!"

  • tokyokv||

    They hire people like this to teach kids, and they wonder why test scores don't improve.

  • Ken Shultz||

    "Brooke May, a teacher at the school, claimed last month that the shirt violated the dress code and said the 8th-grader could have his "Second Amendment rights when [he] turns[s] eighteen"

    . . . and his teacher is an idiot.

    The thing about our rights is that we possess them--even when we choose not to exercise them. I wish more people understood this.

    I know people who have never owned a gun but support the Second Amendment. They still care about their Second Amendment rights--even though they never plan to exercise them.

    Rights are choices. They originate as an aspect of our agency--just like morality--which is what we're really talking about when we say that we're all obligated to respect each other's right to make choices for ourselves.

    Yeah, this teacher is obligated to respect this kid's right to choose to say what he wants on his t-shirt--even if his shirt doesn't say anything--just like we're all obligated to respect the gun rights of people who choose not to own a gun.

    This kid is prohibited from exercising his right to choose to buy a gun, but it would be wrong to say that he doesn't possess the right to bear arms because he isn't 18.

    Because the government refuses to protect his right to choose to buy a gun doesn't mean his Second Amendment rights don't exist. If his grandfather buys him a .22 rifle to go shoot rabbits and someone subsequently steals it, aren't the police obligated to help him--just like if someone stole his t-shirt.

  • ||

    The thing about our rights is that we possess them--even when we choose not to exercise them. I wish more people understood this.

    I know people who have never owned a gun but support the Second Amendment. They still care about their Second Amendment rights--even though they never plan to exercise them.

    Even further as natural rights they represent an embodiment of natural order. The alternative to recognizing a right to free speech is a right to bear arms. We can all absolutely agree that violence should only be used as a last resort if at all, but if I'm unable to even speak in order to redress grievances against me then my options as far as justice goes are between zero and one.

  • Libertymike||

    And one is out of town.

  • Marcus Aurelius||

    When you realize that over 50% of teachers are idiots...

  • Paloma||

    He wasn't even trying to buy a gun or anything. This is really a First Amendment issue. And if the kid wasn't disrupting anything, just triggering the teacher, then he should be allowed to wear his shirt without interference. It's the height of hypocrisy for teachers to encourage students to carry signs demanding gun control, but censure any student with a different opinion.

  • ThomasD||

    Not merely hypocrisy, as state actors the Constitution bars them from engaging in such flagrant viewpoint discrimination.

  • ||

    Slightly OT:

    I got to visit my son's school for a project he did. One of the random(?) questions that got asked as part of the typical parent Q&A firing squad was, "You have to enact a law or else you'll be physically hurt, what law would you enact?" To which I (didn't) answered, "What's the punishment? I don't want to enact a law and I would probably accept the punishment." The teacher eschewed/segued to the next question with "What I think Mr. Casual is trying to say is that he's happy with things the way they are." I was heartened as I left the room to here the kid ask her what did I mean when I didn't answer her question.

    As a parent, I thought I'd dread the whole class visit thing, but it was actually pretty fun.

  • Rich||

    "You have to enact a law or else you'll be physically hurt, what law would you enact?"

    "Let me answer that question by posing another: WTF?"

  • Eidde||

    A law for hanging people who use physical threats to get laws enacted?

  • ||

    "Let me answer that question by posing another: WTF?"

    I probably would've scrambled her brain completely by saying, "And I'd let the trolley car hit the fat man too."

    I have a very strong feeling the teacher may've eschewed a more protracted discussion about needles, eyes, and horse manure pies.

  • tokyokv||

    Hard to imagine a dumber question.

  • Paloma||

    Enact a law abolishing property taxes and mandating that public school teachers work for minimum wage plus tips!

  • The Metonymy||

    Should wear a shirt that says mandatory education is slavery.

  • Jickerson||

    It's not even education, though, but schooling. People often incorrectly conflate the two.

  • The Metonymy||

    +1 experience

  • Sevo||

    "It's not even education, though, but schooling. People often incorrectly conflate the two."
    If you get lucky, you get some of the first. But it's not the primary goal of the schools.

  • tokyokv||

    Yeah, you'd need educated teachers to educate the students.

  • Deconstructed Potato||

    This reminded me of when a black govt employee tried to jam up a colleague for wearing a Gadsden flag hat because it is "racist" because (lack of) reasons, citing another nonsense complaint about same symbol. EV wrote a pretty tame piece on it when TVC was still at WaPo.

    Remember, kids; freedom is racist.

  • Libertymike||

    Freedom is racist in action because some people prefer to exclusively associate with their own kind.

    There is nothing per se deplorable, evil, immoral, or NAP violating about preferring people to exclusively associate with their own kind, whereas there is something per se diabolical, evil, and frighteningly totalitarian about using force, or supporting the use of force, to coerce A to associate with B.

  • Paloma||

    What does this have to do with the Gasden flag? I'll define who is "my own kind" and you can bet it won't involve any country music lovers or meth addled hillbillies.

  • FlameCCT||

    I would have given him this quote from Bobby Seale of Black Panther fame: "The Black Panther party for self-defense calls upon the American people in general and the black people in particular to take careful note of the racist California Legislature which is considering legislation aimed at keeping the black people disarmed and powerless at the very same time that racist police agencies throughout the country are intensifying the terror, brutality, murder and repression of black people."

    It is truly sad that so many people have never been taught history nor realize that Progressives have been doing the same thing for decades, going back to their start in the late 1800s; denying MLK his Constitutional Rights including 2A.

  • FlameCCT||

    BTW: the quote from Seale is from 1967 when the Black Panthers marched on the CA State Capitol, open carrying long rifles.

  • Longtobefree||

    could have his "Second Amendment rights when [he] turns[s] eighteen,"

    going on 21 - - - - - - - -

    Funny how the natural rights God gave to man have initiation dates.

  • Sevo||

    "Funny how the natural rights God gave to man have initiation dates."

    Ignoring your reference to mythology, there are age limits in such matters. You don't give a 2-YO a semi-automatic in a shopping mall and claim "A-2!"You claim ignorant (and liable) parent.
    I'll bet even your fantasy god-guy/gal would agree to that.

  • BigChiefWahoo||

    But the age limits have no logical consistency.

  • tokyokv||

    LOL, nice strawman you've got there. When I was a kid, you didn't even need an ID to buy a gun. You could order one from the Sears catalog or from any unlicensed retailer. High school kids had gun racks in their pickup trucks. I used to take a 12 gauge shotgun hunting, all by myself in my car, from age 14 (in my state we had driver's licenses at 14) and nobody batted an eye. "Gun crime" skyrocketed only after the Gun Control Act of 1968, and it's just now getting back to those levels as more and more people carry legally concealed handguns. As for "mythology", I guess you're unfamiliar with enlightenment philosophy and the writings of the Founders.

  • DarrenM||

    I have no problem with dress codes, but they need to be applied fairly and uniformly.

  • Vernon Depner||

    And the only way to do that is by requiring actual uniforms. Any dress code subject to interpretation will not be applied fairly. Students of low social rank or with unpopular opinions will bear the brunt of code enforcement if it depends on subjective judgements.

  • JeremyR||

    Somewhat related, that pro-gun Parkland kid was supposedly harassed by school officials and a deputy for posting pictures of his visit to a gun range with his father

  • John C. Randolph||

    I saw that, and I also saw some teacher from the same school get all snotty with him on Twitter.

    -jcr

  • josh||

    They should've held him up as an example. Say, "if you want to learn about guns, this is the safe, responsible way to do it", etc. But no...they assumed he was planning something.

  • BlueStarDragon||

    So I take it that they do not teach to Bill of rights anymore because the second amendment is pro gun.

  • michaelarchangel1||

    really dumb...fat heads..there is NO MORE SECOND AMENDMENT...WHICH IS THE RIGHT TO BARE ARMS TO PROTECT CITIZENS FROM THE USA GOVERNMENT...WHICH SIMPLY WONT HAPPEN AND WILL NEVER HAPPEN...SO GUN PEOPLE...ARE ALPHAS WHO NEED TO HAVE A MATERIAL THING TO HAVE POWER..ITS IN FEAR AND BACKED BY DECADES OF RED NECK IGNORANCE..NO DONT SAY IT PROTECTED ME IT DID NOT....IN MY LIFETIME I HAVE NO ENEMY AND TWO WARS OF INNOCENT MEN AND WOMEN FOLLOWING MR BIG FAT HEAD...SORRY YOU GOT A GUN JESUS...THE SON OF YOU IMBASILS HATES YOU THIS SECOND..SO GOING TO CHURCH AND HAVING ONE SHOULD SAY IT ALL...YOU EITHER LOVE YOUR ENEMIES OR YOUR GODS..ENEMY..GROW UP KID YOU WONT MAKE TO TO 30 WITH THAT FAT HEAD....AND ALL THOSE WHO CHEER HIM PROVE THE CRONY USA IS ALIVE AND WELL AND LYING AND CHEATING THEIR OWN CHILDREN,....GOD DONT CARE ....SO GO AWAY

  • FlameCCT||

    Does it hurt to be so ignorant Mikey?
    Or just normal for a Progressive?

  • Deconstructed Potato||

    It's quite an impressive piece of absurdist abstract poetry. I'm imagining it being performed by a charismatic, deranged beat poet.

  • tokyokv||

    All caps, no less.

  • para_dimz||

    It says something when one thinks ones clothes makes the man or woman. IOW the diversity of personality is bound up in pieces of cloth.

  • tlapp||

    The school supports speech that encourages taking away constitutional rights and bans speech that is in defense of them.
    Schools are now enemies of constitutional freedoms, both the 1st and 2nd amendment?

  • TxJack 112||

    I would love someone to explain exactly how the Gadsen flag which was flown in the American Revolution is a safety issue. The flag was flown by Gen. Christopher Gadsen in 1775. Just because the shirt has the number 2 and letter A on it does not negate the historical significance of the flag or its meaning. Unless of course, you do not agree the American Revolution was a good thing and the people who fought in it did so for a noble reason. This fight in not about the shirt, but the school district wanting to avoid some anti gun parent losing their mind and starting a sh##storm about it.

  • Cloudbuster||

    Unless of course, you do not agree the American Revolution was a good thing and the people who fought in it did so for a noble reason.

    I bet it wouldn't be hard to come up with public school teachers who hold that position. The Marxism is strong in those ones.

  • TxJack 112||

    I would love someone to explain exactly how the Gadsen flag which was flown in the American Revolution is a safety issue. The flag was flown by Gen. Christopher Gadsen in 1775. Just because the shirt has the number 2 and letter A on it does not negate the historical significance of the flag or its meaning. Unless of course, you do not agree the American Revolution was a good thing and the people who fought in it did so for a noble reason. This fight in not about the shirt, but the school district wanting to avoid some anti gun parent losing their mind and starting a sh##storm about it.

  • TxJack 112||

    I would love someone to explain exactly how the Gadsen flag which was flown in the American Revolution is a safety issue. The flag was flown by Gen. Christopher Gadsen in 1775. Just because the shirt has the number 2 and letter A on it does not negate the historical significance of the flag or its meaning. Unless of course, you do not agree the American Revolution was a good thing and the people who fought in it did so for a noble reason. This fight in not about the shirt, but the school district wanting to avoid some anti gun parent losing their mind and starting a sh##storm about it.

  • ||

    This suit defends the exercise of two rights. It defends speech which defends guns for defense. Both are rights. Denial of rights by the govt. is a crime. Govt. is charged with creating an atmosphere where rights are protected, not the opposite. Since authorities profit from governing, it is their responsibility to know what their job is, i.e., ignorance of rights is no excuse.

    Criminal prosecution of right denying authorities would ensue if other authorities did their job as they claim. They don't. Where is the public outcry? Absent. Why? Once the public forfeits their sovereignty to an elite, it is difficult to hold the elite accountable. It is difficult psychologically most of all. Voting is authorizing another to defend your rights. It shouldn't exclude your authority to do so. What is the reality? The public servant is a ruler and the served is the ruled. This ruler/ruled political relationship is socially destructive and morally repulsive. But it is believed to be the only alternative to chaos. The opposite is true. The rulers become lawless enforcers of personal whims. This is political chaos.

  • EscherEnigma||

    My middle and high schools had restrictive dress codes. Only polo shirts and button-down dress shirts, with logos/images smaller then a dollar-bill folded in half. We had the option of khaki pants (no blue jeans), khaki shorts or khaki skirts, with shorts and skirts reaching to beyond the fingertips with arms pressed against the body. Colors were strictly white, khaki, or our school colors (purple and gold in middle school, hunter green and navy blue in high school).

    The only exceptions were school-team uniforms (cheerleaders and such) or "spirit shirts" distributed by approved school clubs (marching band, gymnastics, etc.).

    hell, we weren't even allowed to have interestingly colored footwear. They made a girl dye her hair because it was an "unnatural color".

    So I'm perpetually skeptical whenever I read these kinds of stories. I wouldn't be surprised if the schools just went to a very restrictive dress code/uniform like mine did.

  • Hank Phillips||

    Mine made us wear ties, blazers (with emblems!) and matching shirts and shoes to a soccer game in South America with England playing. We barely got out alive! What I wouldn't have given for an AK...

  • gabrieljkf||

    So. This is what the school system does to pacify people. With even the mention of anything related to a gun they freak out. How does that even make sense??? That's like the government saying "ghost stories are banned, because sometimes, a mentally ill person believes they are apart of the story (i.e, recent Slenderman stabbing), and then they kill people."

    We should be training people to deal with anxiety and fear, not give into it.

  • tokyokv||

    The trouble is, the people running the schools aren't the sharpest knives in the drawer.

  • gabrieljkf||

    And by deal with anxiety and fear, I mean as in accepting it. If people can't learn to accept anxiety, people's rights will almost always be tread on.

  • tokyokv||

    Depends on whose "anxiety" they're talking about.

  • josh||

    Maybe in the meantime, he should wear a t-shirt saying "I feel litigious..", or some variation. See what other political speech they're not willing to allow.

  • Hank Phillips||

    Do vice squad agents, tax collectors and US Marshals wear guns in Nevada?
    The bright side is there may be a way to place bets on the outcome of the court case.

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