colleges

Universities Play the Victim in Admissions Scandal, but They're Far From Blameless

Higher education is a moral mess.

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Darren4155/Dreamstime.com

In the recent college admissions fraud scandal, the universities are the victims. Or at least, that's the official position of Georgetown University, which sent an email of talking points to its faculty after news broke that the school's former tennis coach Gordie Ernst was involved in the bribery scheme. At first glance, they're right.

But digging a bit deeper, the schools are far from blameless. This episode—in which celebrities and other elites are accused of bribing college officials and cheating on standardized tests to help their children get into elite colleges—reveals a number of unflattering things about academic business ethics.

It's no real surprise this sort of thing happens. Georgetown, like every other university or large corporation, suffers from a principal-agent problem. Employees are supposed to serve the institution's interest, but often professors, administrators, staff, and students can serve themselves at the expense of everyone else. In this case, the people in question, such as Ernst, are alleged to have committed criminal acts.

In some cases, though, such behavior is perfectly legal and hard to check. For instance, in our forthcoming book Cracks in the Ivory Tower, we find that the more financially needy a department is, the more frequently its classes appear as gen-ed requirements. There's little evidence these gen-ed classes teach the skills they're supposed to, so the best explanation—at most colleges—is they exist to inflate departmental budgets at the expense of students.

Elite universities are a kind of ideological paradox. On one hand, faculty and staff overwhelmingly identify with the Left and push social justice causes. But on the other, the universities are hierarchical and reinforce social hierarchies. They serve as gatekeepers of prestige, power, and status. Many have plenty of physical capacity to expand the number of students they admit, but they instead work to keep admissions rates and the number of undergraduates as low as possible, all to enhance the elite status of their brand.

Some of the celebrities in question, such as actress Felicity Huffman, frequently campaign for social justice. Yet, when push comes to shove, we see them (allegedly) using their advantages to secure further privileges for their children. This sort of thing happens throughout academia. Loud, enthusiastic trumpeting of moral slogans conveys the image that one is good and noble, and so people have a selfish interest in being political outspoken. But, half the time, when you dig in, you find that moralistic language actively disguises selfish behavior. It's often just a pretense to ask for more money and power for one's self.

Many commentators complain that donors often buy admission for their children in a perfectly legal way: You pay for a wing in our athletic building; we let your daughter into Cornell. If that's okay, they ask, what's so bad about outright bribes? One might try to defend universities by saying that donors at least pay to help other students. At least some endowment money and donations go to fund financial aid, defray tuition, or supply world-class instruction that couldn't be covered by tuition. A bribe to a tennis coach brings no further benefits to other students.

Still, the admissions scandal reveals several unflattering realities about the institutional incentives of higher ed. The dollar amount of the bribes and the tactics used, including falsely registering applicants as athletic recruits for sports in which they had no history, illustrate that it's far more difficult to be admitted to an elite school than to graduate from it. Parents wouldn't pay if their kids had little chance of graduating. It means many rejected applicants would have succeeded if admitted.

Elite universities present their admissions standards as a screening mechanism to ensure that students can cut it an intellectually challenging classroom environment. Yet evidence that students study and learn little, a pervasive culture of cheating, and a decline in scholarly rigor among faculty provide reasons to doubt this claim. Once in, just select an easy major from the politically activist departments, and earning your elite degree is a cakewalk. Indeed, one of the beneficiaries of the bribery scandal appears to have routinely skipped her classes at the University of Southern California in order to pursue a parallel career as a world-traveling Instagram celebrity.

Despite the relative ease of coursework, admissions remains an extremely scarce commodity at elite schools. The average Ivy League school accepts fewer than 10 percent of its applicants, and other elite institutions maintain similar levels of exclusivity.

So what's actually happening here? Quite simply, these institutions (and likely all universities) are selling a credential rather than the loftier pursuits of "knowledge" and "intellectual enrichment" that litter their marketing materials. When grades are meaningless, cheating is pervasive, and the rigor of obtaining an elite degree succumbs to political activism and other forms of fashionable nonsense, the admissions office becomes the primary rationing mechanism for this scarce and coveted credential. Admissions officers have a long history of allocating spaces at elite institutions for reasons other than merit. Should we be the least bit surprised that they are also susceptible to bribes, corruption, and celebrity influence?

The value of a credential from an elite institution derives not from its curriculum, or the "lifetime of knowledge" it instills, but from the prestige associated with its name. Top universities pride themselves on having a rock star faculty of Nobel laureates and Pulitzer prize winners, on securing prestigious research grants and other competitive honorifics, and on attracting "the best" students. For the same reason, universities are often unforgiving when a prominent faculty member commits plagiarism or fabricates data. If it also turns out that politically and economically connected parents can bribe their way past the rationing mechanism of the admissions process, the associated credential will lose some of its prestige and decline in value.

Therefore, we should expect the universities implicated in the most recent bribery scandal to play the victim, even when their own discretionary admissions policies and corrupt officials helped to make it possible.

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111 responses to “Universities Play the Victim in Admissions Scandal, but They're Far From Blameless

  1. Eliminate all federal education assistance, including ‘research grants’, and see how fast costs decline, and how fast professors get up to speed on actually teaching subject matter, not socialist propaganda.

    1. I haven’t heard anyone talk about ending government support for tuition in years. Even when the tax bill suggested that colleges who receive federal dollars should have their endowments taxed people lost their shit. There is no more subsidized institution in the country than colleges.

      1. One could argue that the K-12 educational institution is more subsidized than college because it’s almost completely paid for by taxes.

        This is the foundation for those on the left who now want college to be “free”: 1) we already provide free school through 12th grade, 2) once upon a time a 12th-grade education was all you needed, but it’s not enough these days, 3) therefore, we should increase government subsidies to college so that it’s free for everyone too.

        1. But, K-12 education is government. In contrast, most colleges are ostensibly “private” even if their consumer purchases are subsidized by government and they are exempt from property tax; capital gains taxes; income taxes, and are able to issue tax exempt bonds.

          1. I don’t disagree with you. Most of K-12 is essentially socialist (government owned & run). There are some private K-12 schools, the majority are public and it’s not quite accurate to call government owned schools “subsidized”.

            For colleges, there a lot of public universities and community colleges, but many, many private institutions. I haven’t checked the numbers, but I think there are slightly more private than public college students.

            Still, those calling for “free” college don’t seem to understand this distinction. They’ll have a hissy fit if school vouchers pay for any private K-12, but they welcome government dollars for private colleges.

            1. “They’ll have a hissy fit if school vouchers pay for any private K-12”

              They’ll have a hissy fit because black kids will be going to their kid’s school. The opposition to vouchers (which is most strong among upper income whites) has a lot more to do with racism than anything else. Except teachers unions who just oppose vouchers, because they don’t want to see the gravy train end.

              The funny thing is how much more popular vouchers are among lower-income and minority demographics.

              1. “The funny thing is how much more popular vouchers are among lower-income and minority demographics.”

                And yet they overwhelmingly vote for Team Blue. it’s a mystery

              2. This trivial incident has been blown way out of proportion. There is really nothing wrong with doing what needs to be done to bring money into our institutions of higher education, including through the admissions process, which is so often encumbered by outdated rules and technicalities that no serious faculty administrator takes seriously. Here at NYU, we are proud not only to rank higher than every other university in terms of academic excellence, but to offer the highest tuition in the country to anyone who can afford to pay it, and we stand by our wrongly impugned colleagues at Yale and UCLA. We are realists. Nobody here reads the faculty code anymore; who has time to waste on such nonsense? Furthermore, we have left all of our competitors behind with our cutting-edge defense of scholarly reputation and our principled opposition to the so-called “free speech” baloney we keep hearing about on various Internet forums. See the documentation of our nation’s leading criminal “satire” case at:

                https://raphaelgolbtrial.wordpress.com/

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        2. This is the foundation for those on the left who now want college to be “free”: 1) we already provide free school through 12th grade, 2) once upon a time a 12th-grade education was all you needed, but it’s not enough these days, 3) therefore, we should increase government subsidies to college so that it’s free for everyone too.

          It’s funny–urbanite cosmopolitans, both right and left, have remarked for years that blue-collar factory and trades workers had no future in this country, that the nation’s employment structure would be almost entirely white-collar office drone/service worker-based. In a such a structure, logically colleges should actually be MORE selective, because you don’t need a college degree to make fast food or clean someone’s house. Hell, you don’t even need a high school diploma, because it’s all grunt work requiring very little thinking to accomplish.

          1. Yet, these same Exceptional People have pushed the narrative for decades that “Everyone needs a degree! You don’t want to not go to college and flip burgers your whole life, do you?” Well, what happens when you pimp college for everyone, but support an economic model that would collapse without fast food/retail workers and maids? You breed resentment in those who don’t have the intellectual heft to make it at an 8th-grade level, much less a college level, and dumb down curriculums to try and accommodate the subliterate masses, many of whom end up dropping out or taking years to finish their degree programs, only to end up in the service industry anyway (or writing slop for shitty clickbait websites) because their grievance degrees aren’t worth shit to white-collar companies.

            1. “You don’t want to not go to college and flip burgers your whole life, do you?”

              It would be much better to flip burgers your whole life with a college degree!!

              1. Ignoring the burger flippers who become managers, then buy multiple franchises and retire rich, despite the best efforts of the socialists.

                1. Ignoring the burger flippers who become managers, then buy multiple franchises and retire rich, despite the best efforts of the socialists.

                  Which are pretty rare. There’s a reason most burger-flippers don’t become anything more than that.

                  1. Most college “educated” become nothing either.

                  2. And with a college degree, those born to flip burgers will still be unfit for any job more mentally challenging than flipping burgers, but be more gullible and lacking in common sense than came naturally.

                2. /sarc?

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      2. “There is no more subsidized institution in the country than colleges.”

        How about the military? Or does Harvard and Stanford also have government subsidized marching bands? Once upon a time, officer’s commissions were available for a price. Very few if any rose up through the ranks. Out of curiosity, are government run military colleges as corrupt as the Ivy League?

        1. I didn’t realize the military was separate from the government. Typically when someone says that an ostensibly private institution is subsidized it does not refer to arms of the government, because that makes no sense.

          1. It’s mtrueman. Good faith debate isn’t his strong point.

          2. “I didn’t realize the military was separate from the government. ”

            I wouldn’t claim that military is separate from government. The president is supreme commander. I would claim that the military is more heavily subsidized than colleges, whether they are ‘public’ or ‘private’.

            “when someone says that an ostensibly private institution is subsidized it does not refer to arms of the government”

            I’d ask that someone to clarify. A private college often receives subsidies from the government. Why would that someone not refer to it?

            1. Would you mind pointing me to a branch of federal government less subsidized than private colleges?

              And for the record when y our army is full of conscripts there’s very little advancement to be had.

              And I love how you argue against current subsidies with “Once upon a time”. Keep up the good work but don’t forget to wipe that drool off your chin.

        2. How about the military?

          Militaries have been an explicit government organization for millennia. No government, not even the Carthaginians, relied entirely on paramilitary forces to act in their defense.

          Or does Harvard and Stanford also have government subsidized marching bands?

          If they’re taking federal student loans as payment for tuition, then yes, they are.

          Once upon a time, officer’s commissions were available for a price. Very few if any rose up through the ranks. Out of curiosity, are government run military colleges as corrupt as the Ivy League?

          Goddamn, that comment really triggered you, didn’t it? God forbid these hedge funds masquerading as colleges survive off of their own endowments rather than Uncle Sam.

          1. “Goddamn, that comment really triggered you, didn’t it?”

            I guess it triggered me a little. I’m curious if government run military colleges are seen as more or less corrupt than colleges such as Stanford or Harvard? What’s your perception?

            Incidentally, weren’t you singing the praises of online education? To me places like University of Phoenix are the acme of academic corruption and exploitative rent seeking. It surprised me that you (if it was you) put any stock in such places.

            1. I’m curious if government run military colleges are seen as more or less corrupt than colleges such as Stanford or Harvard? What’s your perception?

              Why would their degree of corruption be based on my feelz? Have any of the military academies admitted students after getting bribes from a standardized test-taking service recently that I wasn’t aware of?

              Incidentally, weren’t you singing the praises of online education?

              No. I don’t give a shit about online education. Those places are the inevitable result of the social perception that people who don’t have college degrees are losers. They wouldn’t even exist if Americans valued blue-collar work as a positive and necessary means of keeping the economy and the nation running, as opposed to treating it like a haven for dull-witted no-hopers.

              1. See JWatts comment above. This scumbag will pile sophistry on lies, hoping someone will accidentally click on his name and double the weekly hits on his blog.
                Oh, and for real amusement, ask him for a cite for his bullshit claims.

                1. “Oh, and for real amusement, ask him for a cite for his bullshit claims.”

                  My cite: Wikipedia. Laugh while you can, monkey boy.

                  1. My cite: Wikipedia.

                    Nice try, Jan.

                    1. Thanks. Sevo gets ‘real amusement’ from this sort of thing.

                  2. “My cite: Wikipedia. Laugh while you can, monkey boy.”

                    Shit bag, I laugh at your pathetic claims and comments regularly.

                    1. “Shit bag, I laugh at your pathetic claims and comments regularly.”

                      Good for you. It may be there’s hope for you yet.

              2. “Why would their degree of corruption be based on my feelz? ”

                It wouldn’t. I was simply asking your opinion. If military colleges are seen as less corrupt than private entities such as Stanford, perhaps we could learn from their example.

                “Those places are the inevitable result of the social perception that people who don’t have college degrees are losers.”

                I think the government’s programmes to lend money to military volunteers re-entering civilian life are their life-blood.

                “They wouldn’t even exist if Americans valued blue-collar work as a positive and necessary means of keeping the economy and the nation running, as opposed to treating it like a haven for dull-witted no-hopers.”

                By paying them more? But we’re against that. How about taking a hint from the good old USSR? Instead of rewarding efficient producers of delicious fast food with pay rises, we could give them medals and badges, an ‘Order of Washington,’ for example.

                1. I was simply asking your opinion. If military colleges are seen as less corrupt than private entities such as Stanford, perhaps we could learn from their example.

                  Military colleges are a different animal than most universities. I wouldn’t want colleges to emulate them, irrespective of the opaque question of trying to empirically measure corruption.

                  I think the government’s programmes to lend money to military volunteers re-entering civilian life are their life-blood.

                  How much of the DoD budget does GI bill expenditures comprise? VA loans merely provide certain lending advantages as far as rates and down payment requirements; the government doesn’t directly lend the money to homeowners, which has been the case with student loans ever since the Healthcare and Education Reconciliation Act.

                  By paying them more? But we’re against that.

                  Are we? A lot of trades have excellent starting entry pay and merely require a two-year certification course. That’s a hell of a lot cheaper than paying $50K or more for four-six years of tuition, room and board for an English degree.

                  1. ” I wouldn’t want colleges to emulate them, irrespective of the opaque question of trying to empirically measure corruption.”

                    If they were less corrupt it might indeed be something to emulate. It would also be an interesting counterexample to the widely held belief that private colleges are in every way superior to government run colleges.

                    “How much of the DoD budget does GI bill expenditures comprise?”

                    I don’t know. The question I’m driving at is how much of the income of online education institutes comes from government GI education programmes. I suspect it’s a lot. Which is why I was surprised that you (or someone else) were singing the praises of online education, a very exploitative form of rent seeking.

                    “A lot of trades have excellent starting entry pay”

                    The trades are not seen as a refuge for no-hopers. That’s the fast food industry. When Lester Burnham was fired from his middle-class job in American Beauty, he didn’t become a carpenter or electrician. He became a burger flipper at a fast food restaurant. If you want to discourage people from attending school and attract them to jobs in the fast food business, increase their pay.

                    1. If they were less corrupt it might indeed be something to emulate.

                      I know it’s fun to fantasize, but no private or public university, save for the military-like such as NMMI, is going to run their university like the Army or Air Force. As corporatized as the military has become in many ways, they are still different cultural constructs.

                      The question I’m driving at is how much of the income of online education institutes comes from government GI education programmes.

                      Again, why do you keep bringing these up? I don’t give a shit about online education programs and never did. You’re actually complaining because online programs, including ones run by traditional universities, are getting government money from a source other than the Department of Treasury. Do you not realize how absurd that is?

                    2. ” As corporatized as the military has become in many ways, they are still different cultural constructs.”

                      Can you be more specific? I know nothing of military colleges and how they are different from other places. All I know is that several times a week Bobby Soave treats us to another story about the problems with the country’s colleges. But he’s yet to write a word about military colleges. Is it too much to ask what they are doing right?

                      “Again, why do you keep bringing these up?”

                      I thought you had brought up the topic a couple days back, as I’ve said couple times now. If it wasn’t you, my apologies.

                      “You’re actually complaining because online programs, including ones run by traditional universities, are getting government money from a source other than the Department of Treasury. ”

                      That’s not why I’m complaining. If you are interested in the issue, look into it. The problem is value for money. The taxpayers are paying lots of money and getting nothing in return. If a student actually does graduate from one of these online degree mills, something of a rarity, the degree means nothing on the job market. As I say you are welcome to look into it, I simply provide my thumbnail take for your delectation.

                    3. Can you be more specific? I know nothing of military colleges and how they are different from other places.

                      There’s a lot you don’t know about.

                      I thought you had brought up the topic a couple days back, as I’ve said couple times now. If it wasn’t you, my apologies.

                      Then shut up about it.

                      The problem is value for money. The taxpayers are paying lots of money and getting nothing in return.

                      An argument that could be made for the entire student loan enterprise, especially the accreditation system. That you hone in so sharply on the military specifically, when GI Bill expenditures are about $5 million a year out of a $175 million VA budget, speaks more to your own personal biases than it does the merit of the GI Bill in particular.

                    4. “There’s a lot you don’t know about.”

                      I thought you might be able to share with me. It wasn’t a trick question.

                      “An argument that could be made for the entire student loan enterprise”

                      No, because with traditional colleges the graduation rate is much higher. And a degree from such an institute is seen as valuable to employers. Online study has very low graduation rate and is seen as worthless by employees. You really should look into this yourself as you express some interest in the matter, referring back to it repeatedly over the course of this thread. Try wikipedia.

                    5. The trades are not seen as a refuge for no-hopers. That’s the fast food industry. When Lester Burnham was fired from his middle-class job in American Beauty, he didn’t become a carpenter or electrician

                      Oh, Jesus Fucking Christ. Hollywood is not real life. And yes, the trades are absolutely considered a refuge for no-hopers. There’s a very distinct class prejudice against them.

                    6. And your Lester Burnham example doesn’t even support your point. If you recall from the movie, Lester Burnham didn’t get a fast food job because he was looking for work and couldn’t get a regular job. He had blackmailed a large enough severance from his ex-employer that he could sit on his ass and do nothing for a year if he wanted. His actual line when he applied was, “I want a job with the least responsibility possible.”

                      He did it so he wouldn’t get bored, not because he was desperate for work.

                    7. “He did it so he wouldn’t get bored, not because he was desperate for work.”

                      The point is the writer made him a fry cook, the lowest of the low. Had he taken up some skilled trade like a cabinet maker, he would have found himself saddled with unwanted responsibilities.

                    8. The point is the writer made him a fry cook, the lowest of the low.

                      Oh, I don’t know, he seemed to take a lot of pride in his work. That’s not the attitude of someone who no longer has hope, it’s the attitude of someone who doesn’t give a fuck what people think of him anymore.

                    9. “Oh, I don’t know, he seemed to take a lot of pride in his work.”

                      The character is fictitious. The job of fry cook is real. It’s a job without a future, a no-hope job, if you will. A job of cabinetmaker is real too, it is a challenging and respected way to make a living, not a job for someone with no hope, in other words. I’m surprised you need me to explain this to you. Here’s me hoping you could fill me in on the culture of military colleges. I won’t make that mistake again.

                    10. The character is fictitious. The job of fry cook is real.

                      Yeah, I pointed that out to you earlier. Then you go on to cite George Jefferson. You should probably try and keep your arguments straight.

                    11. “You should probably try and keep your arguments straight.”

                      I don’t mind you asking questions if you are having trouble. I won’t insult you too much if you do.

                    12. ” And yes, the trades are absolutely considered a refuge for no-hopers. ”

                      The trades are where you find the working class. That’s not no-hope, or at least it hasn’t been traditionally. George Jefferson would never have moved on up if he hadn’t hope of a better life ahead. Some people have a class prejudice against aristocrats. Doesn’t mean they have no hope either. Right until the very end King Charles hoped someone would put a stop to all this head chopping business.

                    13. The trades are where you find the working class. That’s not no-hope, or at least it hasn’t been traditionally. George Jefferson would never have moved on up if he hadn’t hope of a better life ahead. Some people have a class prejudice against aristocrats. Doesn’t mean they have no hope either. Right until the very end King Charles hoped someone would put a stop to all this head chopping business..

                      This has to be one of the most autistic responses I’ve ever seen.

                    14. It’s more than your farrago of nonsense deserves.

                    15. Left-wing dumbshit, heal thyself.

                    16. I never meant to upset you.

          2. The military isn’t “subsidized” by government, it is a part of the government, created to do the most basic job of government: maintaining itself in power. As for West Point and the other military colleges, these are part of the training establishment the US military requires, because when we inserted a clause in the Constitution banning the nobility, we banned the only class that ever sought and paid for training as officers.

            E.g., when West Point established the first school of engineering in the USA, this wasn’t a subsidy to train engineers for civilian work, but a recognition that the Army badly needed engineers who were Americans, rather than filling an entire corps with foreigners. It also had the beneficial effect of leaking engineers into civilian work when they finished their service obligation and quit, but that was an unavoidable side effect of gaining their trained services for a few years. (Likewise, every company that hires rookie engineers leaks experienced engineers to the rest of the economy. That doesn’t meant the are subsidizing their competitors.)

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  2. The Rodney Dangerfield classic “Back to School”, where Thornton Melon essentially bribes his way in, came out well over 30 years ago.

    Big College has been almost as much of a corrupt cesspool as Big Government for many decades now.

    1. Well, big college is the minor league for big government

    2. +1 Kurt Vonnegut

      1. Vonnegut took pride in coming from Indiana, where the first white man was hanged for murdering an indian.

  3. There’s little evidence these gen-ed classes teach the skills they’re supposed to, so the best explanation?at most colleges?is they exist to inflate departmental budgets at the expense of students.

    What. A. Surprise.

  4. I think I might have been trafficked into college by my parents. What should I do?

    1. Drop out, apprentice to an electrician, and get enough income to buy a house and support a family. Live happily ever after and vote against socialists.
      Very few trades can be outsourced to India or China.

      1. “Very few trades can be outsourced to India or China.”

        Which is why god put Mexico right on our border.

  5. “Indeed, one of the beneficiaries of the bribery scandal appears to have routinely skipped her classes at the University of Southern California in order to pursue a parallel career as a world-traveling Instagram celebrity.”

    Working on the assumption that this Instagram celebrity is the same, another story been breaking this morning that while her mother was posting $1M bail, her daughter was actually partying on a USC Board of Trustees member’s yacht. Story just keeps getting better.

    1. Indeed; when I read that I pictured the little lass holed up in the head, balling her eyes out as the story broke.

    2. The case broke after she was already on the yacht which she immediately left to go home.

      1. “The case broke after she was already on the yacht which she immediately left to go home.”

        In the school’s ‘copter?

    3. Why give scholarships for sports the student doesn’t participate in? Why not do what our local private university does. Varsity sports include e-Gaming and Bass Fishing.

      A letter-sweater for “world-traveling Instagram celebrity” doesn’t seem so unreasonable.

    4. world-traveling Instagram celebrity.”

      There’s a term in the entertainment industry called “yachting,” where these Insta-thots basically whore themselves to famous people on yachting trips as a means of getting a part in a movie or a legitimate modeling gig. A lot of “Instagram models” and “social media influencers” are basically just professional courtesans desperately trying to fuck their way to stardom. I wouldn’t be surprised if Aunt Becky’s little princesses were already working that angle, because there’s no guarantee of steady work even for celebrity offspring if you don’t suck the right dick or have the proper patronage.

  6. Great news!

    BREAKING: Connecticut Supreme Court rules gun maker Remington can be sued over Sandy Hook mass shooting, AP reports.

    The gun fetishists wield disproportionate power because of the NRA. But we advocates of common sense gun safety legislation have reality-based judges on our side. And we’ll have even more when the next Democratic President expands the Supreme Court to 11 or 13 members.

    #BanAssaultWeapons
    #GunSense
    #LibertariansAgainstTheNRA

    1. It only means that the US Supreme Court, with a conservative majority, will have to rule on the misbehavior of the CT Supreme Court.

      Looking forward to it; all the more so when “Notorious” dies of metastatic lung cancer in the next few months.

      Now THAT will be a shit show for the ages!

      1. Roberts will evolve on the issue

        1. Which is why the Federalist Society via Trump needs one more…

      2. RBG is in excellent health and will easily live until the next Democratic administration. At that point, she will graciously step down and be replaced with another justice with a similar libertarian-friendly jurisprudence.

        #LibertariansForRBG

        1. Sometimes you really are funny.

        2. She really should step down.

          Jesus, give it up already.

          1. At this point, if RBG tried stepping down, she’d probably break a hip. She’s going to stay there until they wheel her corpse away. And then who’s going to want to sit in the chair RBG died in?

            1. “And then who’s going to want to sit in the chair RBG died in?”

              There will be the required disclosures and NO ONE will sit there.

    2. OBL, to be a parody,you have to actually say some things that the people you are parodying wouldn’t.

      It’s time to give it up.

      1. But did you read the one about Victoria’s Secret several days back? I literally snorted! Lack of lacy panties is a national crisis!

      2. But that’s exactly why I find OBL so entertaining. I literally could copy-paste OBL’s stuff onto my Facebook page and watch the Likes pour in from my progressive friends. OBL has an impressive familiarity with the language and thought process of those being parodied.

    3. So the plaintiffs will be arguing that, in Connecticut, Remington should pay damages resulting from a 2012 mass-murder, because Remington legally sold, to a person who didn’t kill anyone, a rifle that was approved for civilian possession under Connecticut’s 1993 assault-weapon ban.

      I’ll bring popcorn.

      1. Exactly. The gun manufacturers don’t have special protection [they are no different from any other company in terms of product liability]; if Remington makes a rifle that has a faulty trigger and kills someone, they pay for it; just as if my Subaru has defective brakes etc. But if I use my vehicle to run down a hundred or four people, not their fault. What they want of course is special liability for gun companies, for the express purpose of putting them out of business.

        I cannot even imagine the Ninth Circuit supporting that premise. Next look for more headlines of outrage: “The Families of Children killed at Sandy Hook have to pay for Remington’s legal fees!!” That of course is what happens when you sue someone on frivolous grounds and force them to incur millions in attorney costs.

  7. If the schools didn’t take federal money they could just auction off the slots.

    1. Sure they could but that would destroy their brand and the value of the degree.

      1. Well, every time AOC opens her mouth, the value of degrees from Boston University goes down.
        It must be constantly said the she has (cum laude no less) two degrees from that diploma mill; international relations and economics. Keep that in mind as you read about the new deal, and her international relations concepts.

        1. There is no way she’s had an economics class much less a degree.

      2. If giving in to the SJWs, and sometimes legislatures, to base admissions on the color of one’s skin, didn’t “destroy their brand and the value of the degree”, then nothing would.

    2. Interesting thought. Why can’t schools auction off the slots despite taking federal money? What specific law or contract condition would that violate?

      1. For the same reason that if you go to a popular restaurant without having made reservations beforehand you can’t just slip the ma?tre d’ a hundo and go to the head of the line for a table. You try that shit and you’re looking at Federal hard time, buddy, that’s some serious shit.

        Of course, I’m not actually sure which Federal laws exactly these people broke by cheating on their entrance exams, but I’m quite certain it must be gravely serious.

  8. Where did the University President think all that extra money was coming from, along with all those unqualified students? Money from the money tree in the horticultural building? Unqualified students the children of the service workers who sneaked them in on their shift? Sure, I believe that baloney!

  9. -Never mind, speaking of embracing SJW nonsense, when academia turns on reputable and respected professors like Alessandro Sturmia.

    -The calculus goes something like: Credentialism and bribery + Affirmative Action = Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

    -“…But, half the time, when you dig in, you find that moralistic language actively disguises selfish behavior.”

    The modern left in a nutshell. I absolutely do blame the progressive left for the entire mess we see on college campuses. It sure as hell ain’t conservatives shutting speech or screaming for social justice.

  10. So much for “I have a degree (in Puppetry) from Harvard; I’m your rightful ruler” from the left.

    1. Where has the asshole Rev been?

      1. I’m guessing you need someone to cuss out and tell to die?

        Not that he doesn’t deserve it. That thing called Hihn [and all his puppets] has been absent as well [I seriously suspect he’s getting tuned up at his favorite psych ward]. At least we still have Tony the Troll.

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    1. I looked into this, but prostitution is illegal in my state.

  12. They are about as far from victim in all this as you can get – un-indicted co-conspirators is closer to the truth.

    They support the prosecutions because it protects their racket. And more than just the tuition fees and all the other stuff, this – more than anything – is about their tax exempt status.

    1. Like the prostitute and the john; both guilty as hell of something.

  13. Georgetown, like every other university or large corporation, suffers from a principal-agent problem.

    Even small organizations suffer from principal-agent problems. You’ve never heard of the bartender who serves drinks and puts the cash in his pocket instead of the cash register?

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  15. This reads like the the final exam in socialism 101.

    Distort market forces – Check
    Pervert incentives – Check
    Assert governments role – Check
    Prove that some animals are just more equal than others – Check

  16. HEY LOOK! More EFFECTS of socialized education in this nation.

  17. As I have been seeing this, I keep thinking that it would have been much better if the schools had just offered to sell admission to those people and took the money from that sale to be used to fund scholarships for needy qualified students. Then you do not have a fixer and coaches pocketing the money and deserving athletes denied a scholarship. The process is open and like so many other places in society where a certain amount of money will allow you to jump the line. The cost just needs to be high enough to buy four years for a deserving student or perhaps two.

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  19. The last time any American institution actually took responsibility for its actions was, I think, back in the late 1700’s. Sure hasn’t been anybody taking the blame since WW1.

  20. Colleges degrees are like diamonds. You usually acquire them at the beginning of your adult life, immediately getting into debt. They have little intrinsic value that you can’t get elsewhere for much lower cost. Their value is almost entirely tied to perception and hype. Most reasonable people know all these things but continues to be dragged into the trap by social pressure. People are irrational fools.

  21. “Elite universities are a kind of ideological paradox. On one hand, faculty and staff overwhelmingly identify with the Left and push social justice causes. But on the other, the universities are hierarchical and reinforce social hierarchies. ”

    No paradox here. Leftists are never truly anti-heirarchical, but just want themselves at the top – and whenever they imagine that they might succeed in taking it over, they advocate unlimited power for the heirarchy.

  22. There are many universities which plot bogus admission policies and trap innocent students due to which they have to suffer academically and financially. At my time i was very cautious in opting for a medical university so i went through all the pros and cons of caribbean medical schools, so that i don’t end up wasting my money and my academic year.

  23. I often read news about scandals in the universities of the world. Personally, I’m in College and everything is quiet in this regard. However, recently there was a small incident and the graduate was accused of plagiarism of academic paper. It was unpleasant. Since I use the tool for essay plagiarism checker and don’t worry about anything.

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