Chicago

Newly Released Video Challenges Cop's Story in Shooting of Autistic Teen

An off-duty Chicago Police Sergeant Khalil Muhammad said Ricardo Hayes was displaying a gun in an "armed confrontation."

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|||Screenshot via Vimeo/COPA Chicago
Screenshot via Vimeo/COPA Chicago

In August 2017, 18-year-old Ricardo Hayes broke out of his caretaker's home, as he had done several times in the past. Upon finding Hayes gone, his caretaker contacted police and informed them that Hayes was missing and had autism.

Some hours later, off-duty Chicago Police Sergeant Khalil Muhammad came across Hayes while driving in his personal truck through a neighborhood. Their encounter ended with Muhammad shooting Hayes.

Now, just over a year later, a video of the shooting challenges the initial police story that there was an "armed confrontation" between the two men.

According to the officer's battery and tactical response reports, Muhammad claimed that Hayes was displaying suspicious behavior and making verbal threats. He also said that Hayes did not listen to his commands and held a "dark object perceived to be a gun." Fearing that an attack from Hayes would result in "great bodily harm" or even death, Muhammad fired two shots with his department-issued gun. One hit the teen in his arm. The other, his chest.

In a 911 call, Hayes can be heard screaming while Muhammad tells dispatchers, "The guy pulled like he was about to pull a gun on me, walked up to the car, and I had to shoot."

But Muhammad's story isn't the only account of the incident. A nearby home surveillance camera also saw what happened, and the video was released on Tuesday by the Civilian Office of Police Accountability (COPA). The video shows Hayes running and stopping in front of a house while Muhammad's truck pulls up on the opposite side of the road. Hayes then walks slowly towards the vehicle before two shots ring out. Hayes then turns and runs away.

Incident begins around 0:49. (Content warning: Disturbing images)

The American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois released a statement asserting that the police department's escalation angle was "false." The group also questioned why COPA waited an entire year before releasing video of the shooting.

COPA released a statement about the delay, citing "strict prohibitions of the Juvenile Court Act and the research necessary to ensure that release did not otherwise violate state law."

Muhammad is on paid administrative leave and has been stripped of his police powers.

The ACLU and others drew comparisons to the department's "code of silence" conduct in the fatal shooting of Laquan McDonald. Chicago Officer Jason Van Dyke was convicted of second-degree murder this month after shooting McDonald 16 times. Footage from the police-involved shooting was finally released after police and the city government fought to conceal it for a year. Police claimed that McDonald was lunging in their direction, though the footage shows him walking away.

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15 responses to “Newly Released Video Challenges Cop's Story in Shooting of Autistic Teen

  1. To be fair, this incident happened before the Van Dyke conviction, so Muhammad likely didn’t realize he could be held accountable for his actions.

  2. In August 2017, 18-year-old Ricardo Hayes broke out of his caretaker’s home,

    You lost me before you finished the first sentence. Why does an 18 year old who was never charged with a crime have to escape? THAT is the libertarian question to start with. Hint … it has something to do with the government backed methods for forcing you to take your broccoli.

    1. His caretaker was Jeffrey Dahmer?

    2. Read the article. Hayes had autism. The article does not specify it but the implication is that he was probably pretty far on the spectrum. That means he was confined to the home for his own protection because he was not competent to care for himself.

      It is no violation of libertarian principles to keep the doors of your own home closed so your 10 month old child doesn’t go crawling into the street while you’re downstairs trying to do the laundry.

  3. So a cop training course is basically Jimbo and Ned explaining how to use the “they’re coming right at us!” excuse, while ‘thinning the herds’ of non-cops?

    1. Cop hiring standards require low end of normal IQ but they can handle rote memorization.

  4. Cop thug was off duty so no dash cam or body cam. No question he would have gotten away with this shit but for a homeowners security video.
    ” COPA released a statement about the delay, citing “strict prohibitions of the Juvenile Court Act and the research necessary to ensure that release did not otherwise violate state law.”
    Yeah right. Apparently the City of Chicago doesn’t have any attorneys on the payroll so the COPA folks had to spend their weekends at the public library researching the issue.

  5. Was the phrase “Allahu Akbar” utterred by anyone?

  6. Remember that at all times every non-cop is trying to kill every cop out there. Cops have to be indiscriminate in who they kill just to survive the day.

    This is true even if, because the cop is off duty, not in uniform and in a civilian vehicle everybody knows he’s a cop and therefore are out to kill him.

  7. Murder. 🙁

  8. Aren’t cops supposed to be courageous?

    1. Nope. Officer safety is paramount, and courage can get an officer killed. Failure to use deadly force when faced with anything that could be perceived as a threat to officer safety is one of the few things that can actually get an officer fired. And failure to obey is to be treated as a deadly threat. Obey or die.

  9. …off-duty Chicago Police Sergeant Khalil Muhammad…

    Another white devil cop killing POC!

    1. It’s hard to get the autistic community to kneel during the anthem, though.

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