Brickbats

Brickbat: Quality Health Care

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Surgery
Dmitry Kotin / Dreamstime

The Green Mountain Care Board, which regulates health care in the state of Vermont, says Copley Hospital's orthopedic surgical practice, which draws patients from across the state, does too many surgeries and generates too much revenue. It wants Copley to reduce both and warns the hospital could face penalties if it doesn't.

NEXT: The Buck Stops Over There

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  1. So the state is going to force patients to use an inferior provider so that provider can make money.

    1. To each according to his inability…

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  2. ” . . . the Green Mountain Care Board . . . has come down on Copley for making too much money and doing too many surgeries. Copley’s success is seen as a violation of the Board’s master plan for managing health care costs in the state.”

    Sheer genius: reduce health care costs by prohibiting health care. Even Obama didn’t think of that one.

    1. Where do you think they got the idea? Obama had to pretend that states had control, but this is single payer in it’s prime.

    2. The theory is that by limiting the supply of care while keeping demand the same prices will go down. Netflix made a series about this called stranger things where in “upside down world” everything is the opposite of the real world. I had no idea they meant Vermont but in retrospect it makes sense. Bernie Sanders is exactly the kind of thing you would expect to crawl out of the interdimensional slime to wreak havoc on our world.

  3. Copley’s success is seen as a violation of the Board’s master plan for managing health care costs in the state.

    Success is never part of the bureaucrat’s plan.

  4. “That’s where some people will say we should get rid of the certificate of need laws altogether, just have open competition and it will bring down the prices,” Ashe said. “I’m not sure that plays out that way in every instance.”

    “Whereas my plan guarantees everyone suffers lack of choice equally every single time.”

    1. The article doesn’t say to which party Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe belongs.

      1. Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe said the theory is, without certificate of need laws, Vermont would end up with too much health care infrastructure, increasing costs.

        A Mayo Clinic on every corner.

        1. That’s how it works, right? Competition increases costs?

      2. But the mighty google know all
        Democrat/Progressive
        official page: legislature.vermont.gov/people/single/2016/14665
        One highlight – Tim served on the staff of Congressman Bernie Sanders from 1999-2001.

  5. Rep. Heidi Scheuermann, R-Stowe, has a hard time understanding why it’s bad to build a successful orthopedic surgery practice in a small Vermont town.

    Because she’s not schooled in moron economics.

  6. Dr. Bryan Huber, department head of orthopaedic surgery at Copley Hospital, admits to frustration with the position Copley finds itself in with the Green Mountain Care Board, especially since the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons predicts total knee replacement surgeries will grow 673 percent to 3.5 million yearly by 2030.

    “I think we need to work together as a team, a system, not necessarily that we’re all controlled by a system, but that there is a more altruistic group that needs to look to the future,” Huber said. “Where can we deliver this care? Who’s best at delivering it? Support the people in the trenches rather than say we’re going to cut back on utilization.”

    Just like patients looking for choice, the doctor doesn’t understand his place on the chessboard.

    1. Is it still legal to get medical care out of state?

      1. You want the cops to shoot your dog?

  7. Henry Ford once ruined this country with efficiency, and dammit Vermont isn’t going to let that happen again.

    1. Ford mass produced cars for the plebes. It ruined what was an exclusive club.

  8. Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe said the theory is, without certificate of need laws, Vermont would end up with too much health care infrastructure, increasing costs.
    “Everyone would have to pay more for stuff,” Ashe said.

    “Nobody needs 28 kinds of deodorant.”

    It’s not just the guy is so damn ignorant he sees competition as an unnecessary duplication of services rather than the primary driver of efficiency, he has his head so far up his ass that he really thinks he and a handful of his buddies are so superior that they are fit to decide for everybody else what’s for their own good instead of letting everybody decide for themselves what they want and let the market decide how things shake out.

    1. I go into town and within just a couple of miles of each other there’s a Walmart, a Publix, a Kroger, an Ingles, a Food Depot and a Food Lion – and each one of them has a bread aisle offering 40 different kinds of bread. Wouldn’t it be more efficient to have just one bread store offering just one kind of bread? No it would not, because it’s the competition from everybody else that drives these supermarkets to offer the “best” bread, whether that’s the best quality, the widest selection, or the lowest price. Each customer can decide for themselves whether they want the cheapest bread, the freshest bread, the most exotic bread, whatever fits their own definition of “best”. And if you’re too stupid to appreciate the benefits of the free market, you’re too stupid to be in charge of making decisions for anybody else.

    2. “he really thinks he and a handful of his buddies are so superior that they are fit to decide for everybody else what’s for their own good instead of letting everybody decide for themselves what they want and let the market decide how things shake out.”

      Dude, it’s Vermont.

  9. Anti-dog-eat-dog Rule.

    I wonder if Ayn Rand ever got tired of being right.

    1. Surgery unification plan at work — — —

  10. With a system like that in place, how are they ever going to de-fascistize it? There will be (already are) overbuilt practices in various places with interests keeping them from closing, merging, or cutting back. Nobody will try to be a better deal, because they see what comes down on them.

  11. According to a comment under the link, GMCB is a remnant of an earlier attempt at single-payer that failed to thrive. Bureaucratic lives matter. Long live the bureaucracy!

  12. Things bureaucrats say:

    “YOU! Stop saving that person!”

    “YOU! We can’t have you making that patient feel better!”

    “HEY! I’ll be damned if you make Obama look bad.”

    “Why should that person get care and not that one? Cease your work and go attend to that one!”

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