Immigration

Trump Trots Out Canada's Obsolete Immigration Policy For America

Merit-based immigration is economically obtuse

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It was the mother of all presidential bait-and-switches.

Trump
Gage Skidmore via Foter

The advance billing before President Trump's address to Congress last night was that he was going to pivot on immigration and call for a bipartisan reform bill that offered a path to full blown citizenship for Dreamers (undocumented aliens who were brought to the US as minors) and legalization for undocumented non-Dreamers in exchange for his enforcement crackdown.

Instead, what Trump offered were the same old bromides to: stir up xenophobia ("the vast majority of individuals convicted of terrorism and terrorism-related offenses since 9/11 came here from outside the country"); demonize immigrants as criminals by displaying families of Americans killed by illegals; spread falsehoods about immigrants as welfare queens ("our immigration system costs American taxpayers billions of dollars a year"); and insinuate that immigrants took American jobs ("what would you say to the American family that loses their jobs" due to undocumented workers).

These claims are completely or almost completely false: Immigrants don't strain the welfare state; they are less crime-prone than natives and gateway cities like El Paso that have a heavy undocumented presence have among the lowest crime rates in the country; and they boost American wages and jobs. Oh and Americans have better odds of being struck by lightning than being killed in a terrorist attack by a foreigner.

None of that of course deterred Trump from doubling down on his plans to build his silly wall; ejecting all undocumented from the country, not just bad hombres; impose a Muslim ban and – his favorite—extreme vetting. The only new – or rather, quasi-new—idea in Trump's otherwise tired and trite immigration agenda was calling for a merit-based immigration system along the lines of Canada (and Australia).

Trump simply tossed out one sentence without offering any details so it is hard to know exactly what he has in mind. But presumably it is something along the lines of Canada's point-based system that both deemphasizes family-based immigration and low-skilled immigration – and emphasizes specialized skills. In other words, Canada awards young techies and STEM graduates more points—and farmhands and older people fewer points, making it easier for the former to reach the minimum threshold required for admission and harder for the latter. It is a sort of industrial policy approach to immigration that privileges some sectors over others (something that, unfortunately, George Bush's ill-fated reform proposal also succumbed to). Given that Trump's Attorney General Jeff Sessions (along with Tom Cotton, his heir-apparent in the Senate) is an implacable foe of all immigration and wants even the H-1B program for foreign techies scrapped, this may count as progress.

Nevertheless, this kind of credential fetish is becoming obsolete even in Canada where it has produced serious distortions at multiple levels.

For starters, at the macro level, it has bred a mismatch between the skills that the economy needs at any given time and the ones that Ontario's central planners anoint. Indeed, at one point, far more foreign techies were being admitted than high-tech companies could employ, generating a whole army of under-employed people with advanced degrees. (I once hired a cab in Toronto with a Russian driver with a PhD in Physics.) At the same time, jobs were going a begging in the farming and construction sectors.

But at a micro level, it generates different problems for different provinces. So, for instance, while Ontario, where the high-tech sector resides, experienced an over-supply of foreigners and over-crowding, remoter areas like Saskatchewan and Newfoundland with more agrarian needs experienced worker shortages and under-population.

This is one reason why Canada is rapidly moving away from its centralized approach and empowering its provinces to effectively write their own immigration policies based on their own economic needs through the Provincial Nominee Program, that I wrote about previously. Under this program, every province gets a quota to sponsor foreigners from wherever they please and for whatever reason they please, including deepening ethnic ties with a region. The federal government's role is limited to conducting security and background checks on the nominees. Many provinces are using this program to poach America's H-1Bs stuck in the green card labyrinth. Canada expects to admit more than 51,000 foreigners through this program in 2017 – a 6.7 percent increase over last year.

One of the huge upsides of this program is that it is not stuck in a crude and economically meaningless distinction between high-skilled and low-skilled immigrants. Indeed, provinces have developed much more finely hewn categories that reflect the complexity of the economy. So, whereas welders are regarded as "unskilled" workers under the American system and therefore not entitled to admission, many Canadian provinces regard welding as a skilled trade and welcome them.

If Trump is looking to Canada for inspiration for immigration reform, all of these are excellent reasons to emulate its PNP program rather than its point system. But there would be a yuuuuge additional advantage of the PNP approach for America, namely, stanching the flow of future undocumented workers.

America shares a border with Mexico and this makes it an attractive destination for low-skilled Mexicans. That hard-working people from a friendly neighbor want to offer their services to American households and businesses would be considered a great blessing in a rational world. But however you view it, so long as there is a massive wage gap between the two countries, these folks will flock to U.S. shores. America's only real choice is to allow them in legally or illegally. (Enforcement and walls can help at the margins but the wage gap is the dominant factor determining flows.)

One option would be create a usable guest worker program – such as the Red Card Solution that Helen Krieble, a conservative, has proposed—with Mexico (and other Latin American countries). Another option would be a PNP-style state-based visa program. Texas' hospitality industry, Wisconsin's dairy industry, California's agricultural industry are all hurting from a tight labor market. And the state governmenets would be far more sympathetic to the needs of their industries than distant bureaucrats browbeaten by a populist president.

Otherwise, long after Trump has gone, we'll be debating a future amnesty for another generation of undocumented regardless of what the president does with the current: leave it alone, deport it, or offer it amnesty. And the Great Wall of Trump will stands as a symbol of the glaring failure of a president who talked smack but solved nothing.

NEXT: GOP Rep. Thomas Garrett Intros Bill To End Federal Pot Prohibition

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  1. How is it obtuse if the rest of the world does it?

    There is just no way to please fascists like you, Shakiha. Go excuse more violence over speech

    1. It worse than an excuse, it was an attempt at justification. An ‘excuse’ is an explicit concession of fault or error plus some degree of blame shifting. There was none of that. To her, brute force is the applicable tool for the job when she deems that person to be lying. I doubt her standards are even that high.

    2. In Canada who does the jobs ordinary Canadians will not do?

    1. Couldn’t agree more.

  2. Well, you can’t blame Trump for trying to block immigration unless you also blame the immigrants for inciting him.

  3. Speaking of the morally outraged…

  4. They’re turning on each other! Love it. Now CANADA is fascist!

    Keep digging, Shikha.

    1. Not only is CANADA fascist but it’s old fascist solutions that are less fascist that the EO that everybody despises are off the table because fascism.

      There are more actually libertarian/less TDS-stricken writers at Salon or the NYT that could’ve done a better job producing a decent article or discussion about Points System vs. PNP vs. Red Card vs. Other. Instead, it’s emphatically a straw man concocted by a woman who makes Brian Williams’ credibility issues seem quirky, superficial, and personal or unrelated.

      1. So I don’t know the details of the debates over points vs PNP versus Red card. You don’t like this presentation, but don’t offer another one. Please enlighten us!

  5. That’s it. I’m done Reason. I’m done with my donations. I’m done giving you clicks and commenting on this site. Shikha’s continued employment with your organization is, for me, the last straw. I bid the commentariat a heartfelt good-bye and to the editors of Reason I bid you a heartfelt go fuck yourselves.

    1. *waves*

    2. That seems to be a growing trend

    3. I suddenly feel a strange compulsion the renew my subscription to Reason.

      1. Awesome- just know that if a magazine folds during your subscription period you don’t get your money back.

      2. I’m with you, Brandy. If these fucks who have polluted the commentariat with their tribalist bullshit ever finally live up to their word and quit, I might actually renew my (long-lapsed) subscription, just because FTTW.

        1. fuck off, troll

    4. We should realize that Reason just doesn’t care what the peasants think.

      They get whatever funding they get from corporate interests and rich donors – who however libertarian they might be on some issues, are Open Borders Uber Alles, because that’s how the Ruling Reptiles roll. Of course they are. That’s what is good for them. Cheap servants, whether personal servants around the house, or corporate cogs.

    5. You’re aware a libertarian system would be much simpler with open borders. While I grant that isn’t quite feasible at this point the next most libertarian system I can think of is more a lottery system that functionally sets a cap. You can still do your vetting in a feeble attempt to keep criminals out and that would keep some folks happy.
      As far as I can tell all the mentioned systems are all some form of centralized planning like one would find in command based economies like the old Soviet Union. All it really does is keep prices artificially high, which we like when it means high paychecks but not when it means high prices of sugar. I think the sooner the world realizes that taxes, tariffs, subsidies, and immigration are all spokes on the same wheel the better off we’ll be.

    6. Hear hear

  6. The points system strikes me as a great way to add a bunch of pathological liars to your population. You really can’t trust any credentials coming out of developing countries.

    1. Her rather redneck anecdote;

      (I once hired a cab in Toronto with a Russian driver with a PhD in Physics.)

      struck me along these lines. I’ve worked with at least 4 former Soviet/Russians who were employed far below their ‘education rank’ in their homeland. Only one I felt was punching above his weight class (the whole nihilist ‘Ya gotta do whatcha gotta do.’ attitude makes it hard to tell) here. The idea that a Russian PhD in Physics deserves or needs to be doing something other than driving a cab is itself pretty fucking fascist.

      “I finished my 20s with a PhD in fusion energy, and I discovered I was useless.” ? Marcin Jakubowski

      1. You toss ‘fascist’ around rather lightly, no?

        The point is not that the cab driver deserves anything, but the fundamental principle of American libertarian ideology that politically-driven government interference in the labor market creates distortions and inefficiencies.

        I’m not that kind of libertarian, but recognizing their argument for what it is allows me to rebut the argument without resorting to name calling.

  7. But however you view it, so long as there is a massive wage gap between the two countries, these folks will flock to U.S. shores. America’s only real choice is to allow them in legally or illegally. (Enforcement and walls can help at the margins but the wage gap is the dominant factor determining flows.)

    Because Dalmia is an idiot who contorts reality around her argument rather than make an argument in regards to reality, she seems to ignore the whole reality the wage gap is a product of a stagnant Mexico, one that constantly uses the United States as a dumping ground for both their underclass and their petty bourgeois. By constantly incentivizing the disenfranchised and angry masses to leave, legally or illegally, Mexican elites protect their racket and ensure that substantial reforms or governmental overturn remain unlikely. By providing the Mexican government with a ‘release valve’ for discontent, the United States actively prolongs a decaying, corrupt system.

    In short, to Dalmia, continuing and even expanding the situation that prolongs the problem is the only way to solve the problem. Because she fails basic logic. In Dalmia’s dream world, Mexico stays a shit hole and millions of Mexicans live here in basic poverty (with or without bloated welfare support).

    That’s the future she wants.

    1. I put this in the other thread but it belongs here-

      40 million people out of work who are neither retired nor in school, and we are supposed to believe that illegal immigration is helping them?

      I’m sick and tired of the “jobs Americans just won’t do” argument when really it’s “jobs Americans won’t do for $4/hour that we let corporations get away with paying because no one enforces immigration law”. I understand that the $4/hour ag worker helps to lower costs at the supermarket but these same immigrants are working awful shitty jobs at borderline slave wages whilst using the welfare system at a net cost to taxpayers. Defending businesses who depend on illegal slave labor to turn a profit at the expense of the American worker and tax payer is a stupid argument.

      1. True open borders mean that the labor market is forever loose and wages are forever at the bottom end of the possible scale. If companies are free to draw from a world-wide pool of labor everyone but the very lucky or very skilled will have virtually no job security or bargaining power with their employers.

        There are of course upsides to that. Cheap wages and huge leverage over their employees tends to make employees work harder and be productive and it makes goods cheap and employers’ profits very high. It also makes the quality of life for the average person miserable. You don’t want to work 12 hours a day or weekends? Fuck you, I have five guys from Mumbei lined up waiting to take your job.

        Maybe that is the society we want. It is certainly the society people like Dalmia want. And that is their right. But it would be nice if just once someone like her would ever suffer the negative consequences of her preferred societal vision or at least be honest enough to acknowledge the downsides for everyone else.

        1. at least be honest enough to acknowledge the downsides for everyone else

          That’s not how it’s done around here, John. When it comes to certain issues, it’s never enough to point out that there’s an overall net benefit. It has to be “everybody’s a winner!”

          1. My favorite is when CATO talks about the “benefits of open borders” and then cites to the huge improvements in quality of life and wealth that would come to immigrants from the third world. They really are transnationalists who see no reason why the US government would put the well-being of its own citizens above those of anyone else.

            1. It’s always easy for CATO and Shitka to say “We should do this” when “this” doesn’t directly impact them. If it impacted them, things would change.

              Cruz’s ad about how we’d see serious immigration reform if the illegals were taking “important” jobs is still apt. Who cares what a shit-kicking construction goon wants? They don’t matter as much as Shitka needing a cheap extension on her house with other home owners insurance policies covering in case they do shoddy work.

              My youngest son wants to be a construction worker. He loves building stuff. And I haven’t hard the heart, yet, to tell them there is almost no chance he can do it.

    2. Pretty much that. Trump was wrong. Mexico doesn’t send us its worst, though they do send us some criminals. Mexico sends us its best. I would take your typical Mexican who leaves to come here to work over one of the Mexican elites every time. For decades Mexico has sent us the hardest working and best people it has so that its lazy, worthless elite can avoid answering for running the place as a kleptocracy.

      That needs to end. We need to do Mexico a favor and start sending these people back and let the Mexicans get together and have a family discussion about how to unfuck their country. After they have done that, and the country becomes comparable to the US and Canada, we can open the border again and be one big happy North American family.

    3. Mostly I’m with Tman, but I would like to point out that the Mexico economy is growing, aided by trade, which is contributing to the decreasing number who want to migrate to the US.

      Historically markets and the development that follow spread from the already developed cities outwards through the hinterland. Borders alter this process and interfere with development. I’m not calling for the removal of borders – merely trying to give a more comprehensive rendering of the landscape.

      1. Mexico has exactly one excuse for not being a developed country by now. No, borders do not interfere with development, government does, and the Mexican government is largely responsible for the state of the country as a whole. Allowing illegal immigration to continue, as Dalmia suggests, does not lead to greater development, it actually slows and negates development by allowing the government that is actively causing major problems to continue to thrive. Throwing open the borders will not magically develop Mexico, the government itself has to change, and some people are doing everything they can to prevent or slow it.

  8. The only new ? or rather, quasi-new — idea in Trump’s otherwise tired and trite immigration agenda was calling for a merit-based immigration system along the lines of Canada (and Australia).

    ______ heads exploded when the left discovered how racist Canada’s and Australia’s immigration systems are.

    1. …and how positively enlightened they are when compared to the immigration systems of Mexico and most all nations of South America.

  9. and legalization for undocumented non-Dreamers in exchange for his enforcement crackdown.

    It is a classic example of double-think to use this term to describe millions of illegal immigrants who have already had extensive contact with U.S. immigration officials.

    How can you describe someone as “undocumented” who: a) filled out a lengthy visa application form providing the U.S. government with an address where they’d be staying in the United States; b) was interviewed and fingerprinted by a U.S. consular officer at an American embassy; and c) was again interviewed, fingerprinted, and photographed by a CBP officer at a U.S. port of entry?

    We have extensive documentation of who these people are; in some cases, they even go through the U.S. court system, if they claim asylum or are in deportation proceedings, so to call them “undocumented” simply because they overstayed their visas, is ludicrous.

    1. I don’t like the term either. It implies that everyone being documented is some kind of good thing.

      1. But it makes it sound as if it isn’t their fault.

  10. In other words, Canada awards young techies and STEM graduates more points — and farmhands and older people fewer points, making it easier for the former to reach the minimum threshold required for admission and harder for the latter.

    It’s funny how countries with stuff like free healthcare and other generous welfare benefits tend to not want retirees and art history majors flooding across their borders. I wonder why that is.

    Anyhoo, I traveled to Toronto on Business recently and got a very interesting grilling at the border. Maybe ‘grilling’ is too harsh a word, but they were very curious as to what the nature of business I was doing, and how it related to the Canadian company I was doing it for. Essentially, it came down to the fact that the CBP is tasked with sussing out the global and geopolitical implications of each business traveler and how the particular task that traveler might be performing could be done by Real Canadian Folks with Maple Syrup flowing through their veins.

    1. Does Dalmai actually not understand why the US taking an old person who is going to come here and consume healthcare and social security benefits is not in the country’s best interest? Is she that dense? I know she is dishonest but is she really that stupid as well?

      1. Um, old people coming here who have not contributed to Social Security are not eligible for benefits.

        “Medicare regulations stipulate that she needs to have been lawfully admitted for permanent residence and have resided continually in the country for five years before she’s eligible to enroll. Then, upon becoming eligible after five years, she’d still have pay for the Part A and Part B premium since she wouldn’t have the Social Security work credits. Part A and Part B premiums added up to $511.90 per month in 2015.” However, with the ACA, an immigrant can purchase private health insurance on the exchanges and is eligible for some tax credits or subsidies.

    2. The same thing has happened to me, and grilling describes it pretty well. By far the worst experience I’ve ever had going through customs, for any country.

      1. I was in Canada as recently as October of 2015 and they let me right in. The only grilling I have ever received at the border was when I flew into London. The Brits were real assholes.

        1. Were you a tourist or traveling on business?

          1. A tourist. I crossed over at Buffalo and back into the US at Niagra falls. And it was May of 16 now that I remember correctly.

            1. I didn’t get that level of scrutiny the last three times I went through over the last couple of years. This was new to me.

            2. I doubt it’s something they do to tourists, unless they suspect you’re actually a business traveler for some reason.

    3. Canada is rather obsessed with Americans taking jobs away from Canadians. If you travel north with more a bit more tech gear than they are used to, they suspect you’re coming to do some work that a Canadian should be doing. They’re obsessed with it.

      I once went to Montreal and Ottawa to provide tech training TO Canadians so that Canadians could do work that Canadians should be doing… but was grilled intensely for it because I brought two laptops and a box of rPIs.

      1. Fucken dumb.

      2. If you travel north with more a bit more tech gear than they are used to, they suspect you’re coming to do some work that a Canadian should be doing. They’re obsessed with it.

        Yes, a counterpart of mine, and American who works for a global Canadian company got stopped by the CBP because he had two cards for a server host in his backpack for the job he was doing. He was stopped for over two hours while they grilled him on why a Canadian couldn’t be doing the work he was doing.

    4. Canada has always been a hit or miss kind of place when passing over the border. Back in the 90’s I lived in Montana and frequently crossed. I’d get grilled about half the time. And I mean grilled, as in, park the truck, get out, go inside, and sit in a room on a little folding chair while some apparatchik behind a high desk peppered me with questions for twenty minutes while someone else ransacked the truck.

      They asked me everything imaginable. One time I got a noticeable rise after being asked if I had ever been to court. Upon saying yes you could just see the woman’s eyes light up, thinking she had somehow got me. When she asked why you could see her visibly deflate as I replied “divorce.”

      Another time my girlfriend (now wife) was with me. They took her into a separate room and actually tried to talk her out of traveling with me. I think they thought I was running girls to the polygamists in Bountiful B.C.

  11. Trump Trots Out Canada’s Obsolete Immigration Policy For America

    Is there any virtue-signalling against Trudeau for enforcing Canada’s presumably racist immigration laws? I can’t cant be bothered to read a Dalmia article, but I suspect T. is above her criticism.

  12. “The advance billing before President Trump’s address to Congress last night was that he was going to pivot on immigration and call for a bipartisan reform bill that Trump offered a path to full blown citizenship for Dreamers (undocumented aliens who were brought to the US as minors) and legalization for undocumented non-Dreamers in exchange for his enforcement crackdown.”

    Trump said that or did the media speculation get a bit carried away? I read a lot of takes on it and not many said full-blown citizenship.

    1. The media, and the left (I repeat myself) were probably just giving themselves a wet dream and some idiot leftist (there I go again) passed it along.

  13. She spends energy carefully working out the subtle differences in our immigration policy but still insists on lying by conflating anti-illegal immigration with being anti-immigrant. Trump SPECIFICALLY said the problem was ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION. To stretch that to him being xenophobic is to deliberately not acknowledge this important distinction.

    This coming from a woman who wrote that crap during the Milo scandal.

    Beyond that Dalmia is just trumping out the usual blither-blather gibberish we see among the cocktail media about Trump.

    Reason. You keep this shit up and zero dollars from me during the next drive.

    1. This.

      Regardless of whether you consider her positions to be libertarian Reason, Dalmia has a long-standing record of blatant dishonesty and distortion. This is, of course, ignoring her open disdain for freedom of speech and justifications for violence against others. Terminate her if you want your publication to maintain even a degree on legitimacy.

      1. Trump is not open borders or a Libertarian. But if you take him at his word, he is not anti-immigrant or xenophobic either.

      2. They’ve been shedding readers and commenters like a balding man sheds hair and they just don’t care.

        1. Shedding? 100 or so leaving is shedding?

          It would be interesting to see the numbers though.

          1. The Alexa stats show a fairly precipitous drop in rank but you have to pay to get the raw numbers. It doesn’t look particularly good though.

            1. Yeah, Alexa’s ranking chart does not paint a pretty picture.

    2. I would be willing to bet that once the illegal situation is under control, that Trump will roll out some kind of streamlined program for those seeking US work VISAs, and those seeking US residency.

  14. This didn’t have to be such a hostile article. Shikha could just have said “Trump hasn’t said how his proposed system will work. Hopefully, it will be more like the current Canadian system (i.e., federalist), and less like the old, centrally-planned system.”

    1. Nasty, hostile, and poorly reasoned is what Shikha does. It is her move.

  15. I owe Ed and Robby $25 each for next year’s donation. Good luck getting a fucking dime after that.

  16. Trump Trots Out Canada’s Obsolete Immigration Policy For America
    Merit-based immigration is economically obtuse

    When you’re dealing with people who support merit based immigration policies, the only way to settle with them is brute force.

  17. So long as we have a welfare state, there is no reason to import poverty.

    There is no reason to encourage low-skilled, uneducated people to come to the US so that taxpayers can foot the bill for fraudulently obtained social service, ER visits, downloaded citizens (aka anchor babies). There is no reason an illegal alien should be allowed in-state tuition at state colleges when authorized foreign students pay out-of-state and then some. There is no reason illegal aliens should be getting the EITC.

    If we need a sensible guest-worker program, and we do, it necessarily must include prohibitions against accessing welfare benefits. Fraudulently obtaining benefits should immediately invalidate the work permit and result in deportation.

    Please don’t start with the “they use services at a lower rate…” First, they’re not supposed to be able to use the services at all, so their rate should be 0. Second, it’s bad enough that we have natural born poverty and welfare dependency, there is no reason to import more poverty!

  18. “These claims are completely or almost completely false: Immigrants don’t strain the welfare state; they are less crime-prone than natives and gateway cities like El Paso that have a heavy undocumented presence have among the lowest crime rates in the country; and they boost American wages and jobs.”

    Oh well, if Shikha says it so, then it must be so.

  19. Ms. Dalmia, cramming more poor people into a country on the theory that a short-term boost in people willing to work dirt-cheap amounts to real long-term value creation is simply crazy. If Canadians value what the agricultural worker produces so much, they can price it highly enough to attract actual Canadians. The market for that labor and that product will clear itself.

    And anyone admitted in one territory is then going to be free to move to any other territory, which means that border controls are next to nil; someone admitted through Alberta’s policy can be in Newfoundland, which didn’t want that kind of person, a couple days later.

  20. Canada’s something like 90% white (it’s probably the whitest country in the western hemisphere) and most of their immigrants are Asians. The dots connect themselves.

    Can undocumented immigrants receive healthcare in Canada? Go to school and get jobs? If not, then Canada’s immigration policy isn’t more “humane” than America’s. And I have no doubt that Canadian authorities nab illegals off the streets or their homes and thrown them in detention center, which terrifies limousine liberals but is fairly standard in most nations.

    The notion that immigrants boost wages for most people is simply ABSURD. This is not the experience for 90% of immigrants. I would like to see the study that makes this claim, but I’m guessing the totals are inflated because it includes wealthy individuals working in fields out of the grasp of most Americans.

    I’ve worked in Koreatown and worked for a number of immigrants. Believe you me, I wish this fantasy was true. None of you have a white uncle who makes 20 bucks an hour working for Mr. Chang’s noodle house. Latinos make decent wages in cash, but they get no benefits, which is effectively a pay decrease.

    Sometimes I wonder if Shikha has any firsthand experience as an immigrants. If she stopped an Asian dude on the street and asked him “Do you make more money working for immigrants”, does she actually expect a spirited ‘”Yes”?

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  23. Hey, here’s a suggestion: Let’s put it up to the American People what kind of Immigration System we should have?
    Oh, wait, we did that……AND TRUMP WON!

  24. Well bless my soul! I’m amazed at the lack of reason and high level of vitriol on display, especially among what is presumable the libertarian readership. Is it possible that a right-wing nationalist website call for it’s followers to come over and attack?

    1. not one of these commenters is new.

    2. Yep, you caught us.

      Although, here’s a pro tip for you, Mr. Wil E.Coyote: Making baseless and obviously false accusations is a rather good way to destroy your credibility.

  25. Charge $50,000 for a permanent green card (unrelated to citizenship).

    Let the person who lends you the $50,000 hold the green card for collateral.

    Eliminate a ton of bureaucratic BS.

    http://www.rickstewart.com/content/immigration

  26. Trump specifically said the problem was ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION. To stretch that to him being xenophobic is to deliberately not acknowledge this important distinction.

    1. Do you never read Reason?

      They’ve intentionally ignored that for a while now.

      They don’t view illegal immigration as being any different than legal.

  27. The idea that immigration raises wages is literally IMPOSSIBLE by the basic laws of economics. It necessarily lowers wages or raises prices or both, but never neither.

    It is possible that immigratikn cqn sometimes increase long-term growth by making sure that infratrustcurally industries can cheaply expand during periods of massive technological change (industrial revolution), but nowadays the shift is towards automation and extreme worker prodocutivity , so its unlikely this will happen in this way

  28. Did all of Hihn’s comments get cut?

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  30. I am betting Shitka wouldn’t be happy if Trump decided to use Mexico’s illegal immigration policies instead.

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