Campus Free Speech

This Trauma Center That Helps Millennial Snowflakes Adjust to Adult Life Is Fascinating, Horrifying

This cult tells young people all their problems are due to trauma, marginalization, and oppression. Sound familiar?

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Trauma
Dreamstime

Thomas Szasz is not the hero we deserve, but the one we need right now.

That's the implicit takeaway from Fusion's impressive profile of Yellowbrick, a mental health facility and trauma center for a certain kind of patient: relatively privileged millennials who can't seem to adjust to the demands of adult life.

Based on my reading of the Fusion story, there doesn't seem to be anything especially wrong with these people, in a medical sense—or, put another way, they're suffering from the same kinds of fears, traumas, and stresses that plague practically everyone. But the patients have been convinced—scammed may be the better word—to believe that their struggles are diagnosable, treatable, and fixable. With the right therapy and medicine, and for the right price, 20-somethings who can't hold jobs, finish school, or form lasting relationships will be transformed into fully functioning adults.

Did I mention that Yellowbrick costs $28,000 per month? There's that. Patients must commit to stay at least 10 weeks, but many stay much longer—until their parents run out of money.

Fusion writer Molly Osberg visited Yellowbrick, interviewing the staff and former patients (she was denied access to current patients, it seems). Here's how she summarizes the place:

Yelllowbrick was founded a decade ago specifically to treat "emerging adult" brains. It helps its patients navigate the extended period between childhood and adulthood by fostering habits vaguely existential in nature: the realistic setting of life goals, the formation of an adult relationship to one's family, "identity consolidation" and self-esteem.

The center's staff of 33 ministers to a live-in population that hovers around 15, as well as a number of outpatients—though in recent years it has been expanding more aggressively. Yellowbrick's psychologists are nationally recognized. They run the conference circuit and publish their own (non-peer reviewed) research journal. Their approach is holistic in the most extreme sense of the word. Some of the neurological treatments Yellowbrick draws on are still being research-tested; it complements them with yoga and meditation, massage, dramatic role-play, and art therapy.

Yellowbrick describes its emerging adult patients as "troubled." It treats, among other things, mood and anxiety disorders, PTSD, psychosis, avoidant personalities, substance abuse, eating disorders, and "failure to launch." Like other forward-looking residential facilities of its kind, it rarely issues a single diagnosis, preferring to treat patients for a handful of behaviors at a time.

Patients live in a building of four communal apartments ("the Res") on a quiet suburban street in Evanston, 14 miles north of Chicago. Every day they travel by car or foot the half mile downtown to Yellowbrick's treatment center, a labyrinth of rooms with dark wood desks and soft carpeting, which mutes patient's clatter as they migrate between sessions. For most of the day, five days a week, they receive treatment, they sit in small rooms with therapists, they debrief, they gossip, they repeat.

Again, my interpretation of this reporting is that Yellowbrick is a con job. For one thing, it's clearly reliant on unproven pseudoscience. "They call it a center for clinical neuroscience, as if this is [all] scientifically founded," Carrie Bearden, a brain science expert, told Osberg. Unsurprisingly the treatment doesn't seem to work very well. Relapses are common. One former admitted to Osberg that there's no model success story. "I don't know anyone who went to Yellowbrick who's like, 'I'm doing awesome!'" the patient said. Nevertheless, the patient was grateful to Yellowbrick for helping her to realize that her parents would just never understand her struggles. Indeed, former patients had fond memories of Yellowbrick, even though their trauma hadn't left them.

These qualities are reminscient of a cult—one that drains these young people's financial assets while promising them some elusive, unreachable sense of fulfillment and hidden meaning.

What's most interesting about this scam, though, is the phenomenon that made it possible: the emotionally fragile college-aged millennial. No, not all young people are delicate snowflakes, not all college students are obsessed with their own oppression, not all millennials are suffering from weak or imagined cases of PTSD—but some of them are. Indeed, we hear stories about them all the time: from campus newspapers, from professors, and from the students themselves. We hear it from university mental health professionals who can't keep up with the rising demand for counselling.

This isn't really millennials' faults, mind you. A wave of infantilizing trends in education and parenting, coupled with government policies driven by extreme safety paranoia, have convinced young people that everything is dangerous and traumatizing—everything that's wrong with them can be traced back to some instance of marginalization.

The result is Yellowbrick. The result is young people of incredible wealth and privilege who have been convinced that they are too fragile, too oppressed, too traumatized to succeed at life. Their parents are willing to fork over an unbelievable amount of money to provide them therapy specifically-tailored to their neuroses.

Osberg, to her credit, gets the point across that while life may indeed be stressful for Yellowbrick's patients, it's stressful for everyone else, too:

At times, in my conversations with former Yellowbrick patients, my notebook seemed like the only thing separating me from the people I was interviewing. A month after I visited, I dreamt I returned for a follow-up interview, knocked back a few too many IPAs, lost my job, and stayed.

Which isn't to say that Bethany—who says in a text message weeks after my visit that she "obviously has issues"—and I are dealing with anything remotely similar. It's just that pairing pathology with emerging adulthood, finding the symptoms of a treatable illness in years of dead-end jobs or overwhelming performance anxiety as much as in violent acts of self-harm, is confounding and humbling territory.

Who hasn't considered, in their darkest moments, that their poor life choices might be an indication of something inside them that's deeply and irrevocably damaged? How much do you have to fuck up your life in young adulthood to never recover? Stability is rare and fleeting. It's not the reality for most people I know.

The stories the affluent tell about their lives, the neuroses they stoke, trickle down and become the standard for everyone else. On some level, everyone in their twenties is waiting for the Big One to come: the final mistake that can't be corrected, the thing that keeps a promising young person from turning into whatever passes these days for an actualized adult.

A few years ago, the sociologist Jennifer Silva coined the term "mood economy," to describe the appropriation of therapeutic language among working-class 20-somethings. In extensive interviews with this demographic, she found that rather than telling the story of their ascension to adulthood though traditional markers like marriage or career progression, they told "their coming of age stories as a struggle to triumph over demons of their pasts." These narratives, she writes, "grounded their adult identities in their personal quests to transform their wounded selves"—usually in terms of overcoming the pain of earlier relationships, the turmoil of mental disorders, or an addiction of some kind.

Privilege, victimhood culture, and un-scientific therapy make quite the toxic combination. There's something—dare I say it?—unhealthy about the idea that failure can and should be automatically attributed to mental illness: it robs individuals of the autonomy to overcome their setbacks, undermining the libertarian notion that people are generally responsible for their own well-being. And, as the Fusion article argues, it's not really helping them.

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168 responses to “This Trauma Center That Helps Millennial Snowflakes Adjust to Adult Life Is Fascinating, Horrifying

    1. Dude, she’s like 10.

      1. She’s gotta be like 40 now.

      2. Fairuza Balk is alll grown up. And hot.

    2. ^I came here to say this.

    3. Eh, looks too much like ScarJo.

        1. There’s nothing wrong with ocular blindness either.

    4. Hopefully she floats better than Natalie!

  1. Thomas Szasz is not the hero we deserve

    Why not? Explain this, in detail.

      1. *** looks around for Swiss ***

    1. It’s a reference to the 2008 movie, The Dark Knight, a play on a line in the script spoken by the character Jim Gordon (played by Gary Oldman) about Batman (aka Bruce Wayne) played by Chrisitan Bale.

      1. And I want it explained! I’m tired of the haphazard spins on this line.

        1. Even the line itself is a very contextual/positional. The fact that there was a third movie kinda indicates Gotham still needed someone to beat the shit out of people.

    2. Because we’re not worthy of him.

      1. So is your contention then that we need him but would not heed him? But if we were worthy of his insights, would we still need him? And if we don’t need him, is he still a hero?

  2. OT: Donald Trump is Time magazine’s Person of the Year

    In this lovely BBC article, they point out that Putin and Hitler were also named person of the year. For “balance” they make sure to mention Martin Luther King jr. as well as Wallis Simpson, the first woman of the year (not missing an opportunity to deride Time for not choosing women more often).

    Not even subtle. The binary choice: two buckets, for “good” and “evil.” Gee, I wonder which one they imply Trump is in. Let’s do another hot take of what Twitter thinks. I’m told that it’s news these days.

    1. I’ve come to the opinion that we will never have a third party because the people are too invested in the us vs them game. I had so many friends talking about third parties until the general election. Then it became a vote for a third party is a vote for Tump.

      1. Our voting system is mathematically inclined to create a two party system. The perception of the “spoiler effect” is all it needs to stay exactly how it is. There are other voting systems that could fix this, but they’re attacked by the establishment as being “too complicated.” One person, one vote = two parties, get used to it.

        Human interactions are tribal and there is no natural tendency for tribes to become as big as absolutely possible. In fact, the tendency is the opposite. We can only personally know so many people and our brains can’t keep track of anyone beyond their limitations. It’s why we reflexively snicker when we see that social media account that has ten thousand “friends.”

        1. +1 Duverger’s law

        2. All political systems are mathematically inclined to create a two party system. While other voting systems may create more official parties, in the end they generally form into two coalitions (i.e. parties): the government and the opposition. In America we form our coalitions before casting votes, instead of afterwards, but the result is broadly the same.

          1. The results are very different, actually. By having winner-take-all elections at different levels, we keep filtering out extremists, and there are few if any real political extremists in Congress. In Europe, fascists and communists sit in parliaments, participate in debates, and often cast decisive votes.

            Since libertarian (=Europe liberal) parties also tend to be small, the US system also keeps them out of parliament as distinct entities. Unlike the extremists, libertarians can find a reasonable home within one of the two major parties.

      2. We won’t have a third party that is a viable choice for President until we have members of that Party in Congress, preferably enough members to sway votes on issues. Otherwise a third party President is another name for four years of nothing the administration wants getting done.

      3. We will never have a stable third party because of the way the US system functions. This has nothing to do with tribalism or what voters want, it’s a result of winner take all style elections. It’s also a good thing: the European parliamentary systems don’t work anywhere near as well as the US system.

        If you have more than two parties, you are going to get socialist, communist, and fascist parties in parliament, taking about 1/3 of the vote, with the other 2/3 evenly split between two moderate parties. In practice, that means that extremists hold way too much power.

        1. Hold way too much power how? Getting a third of the vote gives the extremists an opportunity to vent, and maybe raise some important issues that the moderate parties would rather not deal with. Meanwhile, if something doesn’t get done because the moderate parties can’t agree on an approach, it probably *shouldn’t* get done.

          And where do they hold way too much power? Switzerland? Canada? New Zealand? Australia? Norway?

          It’s not even as if we have two real parties. What we have is an oligarchy with two factions, which agree on the principle that the purpose of government is not to secure the rights of the individual but to shower their adherents with goodies stolen from the Simple Folk, which is us. The only distinction between the ‘parties’ is a slight difference in the specific gang of cronies who get the goodies.

  3. It helps its patients navigate the extended period between childhood and adulthood by fostering habits vaguely existential in nature: the realistic setting of life goals, the formation of an adult relationship to one’s family, “identity consolidation” and self-esteem.

    More like drama center. Am I right, people?

    1. I have it on good authority that the counselors are actually script writers, and they’re mining these poor souls for Portlandia plots.

  4. Fusion magazine?! A la Lyndon *LaRouche*?!

  5. This seems like an appropriate place.

    http://www.foxnews.com/enterta…..ation.html

    The website states, “We call on all people of good conscience to join in disrupting the ceremonies. If Trump is to be inaugurated at all, let it happen behind closed doors, showing the true face of the security state Trump will preside over. It must be made clear to the whole world that the vast majority of people in the United States do not support his presidency or consent to his rule.”

    Where has Mr. Moore been for the last 8 years?

    1. He’s been up his own ass for 8 years, just like most other professional leftists.

    2. Wow. Chaz Bono really looks old anymore.

    3. “”or consent to his rule.”””

      They wanted an imperial president with Obama. They applauded his phone and pen comment. They think the president should be able to act unilaterally when congress refuses to give them what they want. That’s why they are scared. They fear what Trump might do with the imperial power for which they advocated.

      1. Yeah, I saw that as well. Proggies really do want a dictator. It just has to be “their” dictator.

    4. You know who else presided over a security state?

      1. A former Time man of the year?

    5. The “vast majority of people”? So, the vast majority of those who voted *for* Trump are non-persons.

      1. He didn’t even get a majority of the vote (nor did Hillary), and I think less than half of eligible voters voted.

        But “vast majority” is probably ridiculous. Most people will accept it and get on with their lives.

        As someone who has never consented to any president’s rule, I wish it weren’t so.

        1. It takes a special kind of retard to use the phrase ‘vast majority’ in a barely-won election season. I say the same thing about people who say Trump has some ‘mandate from the people’, it just isn’t there.

          1. well, to be fair he DID win against the largest deckstacking since Roosevelt’s third run. So I suppose that counts for something.

    6. Michael Moore seriously thinks that he can win the hearts and minds of Americans by disrupting the presidential inauguration?

    7. Trump won’t have to create a security state if Moore and his followers don’t disrupt the inauguration. Moore would be creating the situation that would require the security state. does he not see the stupidity of his own thoughts, its like saying i’ll prove that all cops shoot people by attacking a cop.

  6. publish their own (non-peer reviewed) research journal.

    Of course they do.

  7. How much do you have to fuck up your life in young adulthood to never recover?

    Well, you’ll never know unless you try.

    1. If you’re never taught to function, you’ll never know how to recover.

  8. In her defense she did just find SugarFree’s blog.

    1. “My hair never talks to me!,” she wailed.

  9. Nevertheless, the patient was grateful to Yellowbrick for helping her to realize that her parents would just never understand her struggles.

    At $28K a month, her parents do seem incapable of understanding that she just needs to harden up. So that’s a form of not understanding her struggles — or her ingratitude.

    1. At $28K a month, her parents do seem incapable of understanding that she just needs to harden up.

      Relevant.

      1. 28 thousand a month?
        For that kind of money, why not just stay in college and keep getting degrees?

        1. At $28k/month you could spend what most people live on, and in less time than it takes to get a degree save enough to retire.

          1. this is what I was thinking

    2. Yellowbrick? I think Goldbrick would be more appropriate!

      1. Well, considering the Yellowbrick Road led to a place run by a charlatan masquerading as a magic talking head this seems rather appropriate.

        It does say something, in my mind, when a parent is willing to shell out $28,000 per month on unproven therapy for their 20-something year-old kids. That’s either a whole lot of love and not a lot of sense, or more likely a lot of guilt over something and not enough fucks to give about where you shovel your kid off to.

        The devil’s in the details, methinks.

  10. Did I just read a Soave article that has no hedging comments in it? No silver linings, no misguided attempt to understand where they’re coming from? Just a straight up “this is bad and this is why” article.

    Comment section antibiotics seems to be breeding a new, adaptive strain of Soave.

    1. Huh?

      they’re suffering from the same kinds of fears, traumas, and stresses that plague practically everyone.

      not all millennials are suffering from weak or imagined cases of PTSD?but some of them are.

      1. At $28K/mo. I think they’re suffering from exceptionally rare fears, traumas, and stresses. I’m fairly certain that any $28K/mo. stress I may incur would be at least 50 ft. long and include women in bikinis.

        1. How can you even WALK with that thing?!?

      2. That’s not really hedging. It’s acknowledging a problem without referring directly to its source: themselves.

        If you take a pattern of perfectly normal human problems and deep fry that sucker in a vat of social circle toxicity, you should totally expect maladjusted adults who can’t cope. Soave’s just saying that they need to learn to cope, and scamming them (or their parents) out of a fuckton of cash while declaring it a “medical” problem isn’t the solution.

        1. That’s not really hedging. It’s acknowledging a problem without referring directly to its source: themselves.

          Then your notion of hedging and my notion of hedging are very different.

          I see little difference between “But you can understand where they’re coming from.” and “Suffering the same foibles we all do.” He’s still giving them their imaginary PTSD and insinuating that we all suffer from imaginary PTSD.

          1. He’s still giving them their imaginary PTSD and insinuating that we all suffer from imaginary PTSD.

            Not that that was his intent, but the plain text reading is there.

            1. you’re right, its sloppy. no one really complains because they’re used to bigger problems.

          2. I’m not sure how you’re getting that. I think he’s pretty straightforwardly declared that these kids are hypochondriacs who have misdiagnosed themselves as having real problems, when the “problems” they have are simply the human condition. There’s a group of clinicians preying upon them for beaucoup bucks.

            He didn’t come right out and point the finger at who is responsible for it all because he knows his audience.

            1. He didn’t come right out and point the finger at who is responsible for it all because he knows his audience.

              I’d say he’s done better. The doctors aren’t licensed and, at least superficially, don’t exactly claim to be. The kids aren’t forced to go and the parents aren’t forced to pay, prices aren’t being fixed by the government, and the overarching point is that not-doctors are guilty of something because they charged lots of money.

              I don’t feel that he’s deliberately excluded any libertarians in his piece but when you say he’s catering to his audience, I’m not entirely convinced of their political leanings one way or the other.

          3. He is saying that what they call PTSD the rest of us call Monday.

            1. And that’s stealing bases and/or ceding lots of ground. People went to counseling before millennials existed. Until exceedingly recently it wasn’t for ‘case of the Mondays’-type stuff. Lots of black people have really shitty days, sometimes it’s more than just Monday and sometimes it’s because they’re black. The vast majority don’t think, ‘If I spend enough money on a shrink, it’ll fix my blackness (or racial anxiety or whatever).” I’m not black, but because Mondays and shitty people, I can associate with the occasional rant about being underserved as a person or underappreciated as a group. I wouldn’t liken that to knowing what it’s like to have a friend or relative lynched or suggesting that we all know what it’s like to suffer from perceived lynching syndrome.

              Like saying our world is clearly deep-dish, thin crust binary but we have to understand that there’s is a pita/ thin/pan/sicilian/deep-dish/fondue world. Sure, there’s a spectrum and it kinda sorta overlaps with ours but pitas and fondue aren’t fucking pizza no matter how you slice it and no amount of pizza stratification in any real way equates pita and fondue.

        2. scamming them (or their parents) out of a fuckton of cash while declaring it a “medical” problem isn’t the solution

          It is for the scammer.

      3. I think you are missing the point. He’s pretty clearly saying that they are making ordinary doubts and anxieties that most people experience into some kind of big deal trauma thing, strongly implying that doing so is not a good thing.

        And the second line you quote is saying that not all millennials are fragile or attention seeking fakers playing the trauma card. Which I’m pretty sure is true. And that some are. Which is also true.

      4. they’re suffering from the same kinds of fears, traumas, and stresses that plague practically every [progressive and neo-Marxist]

        There, FTFY.

  11. Nooo Robby! Don’t regress to your former no alt-text ways! Stay good!

    1. Are his non-alt text ways causing you to suffer from imaginary PTSD? Apparently there’s a place you can go for “treatment.”

  12. There has to be an easier way to legalize pot than this.

  13. This cult tells young people all their problems are due to trauma, marginalization, and oppression.

    Is there a basis for this claim other than Robby’s need to suck up to yokels? The Fusion profile does not seem to support it. It seems to suggest instead that Yellowbrick diagnoses “failure to launch” as due to deep-seated psychological problems (that may well not be real).

  14. I cured my youthful angst by joining the Navy. I was cured well before the end of the ten weeks of boot camp. And THEY paid ME.

    1. A snowflake from yesterday described the transgender school bathroom issue like having your wardrobe picked out by your worst enemy. How uncomfortable it would be to wear those clothes everyday.

      It struck me as odd because the person actually picking the wardrobe is them and the person making them choose the other restroom is really more indifferent than existentially opposed. Cases where your enemy would get to effectively choose your wardrobe would include combat and/or adverse working conditions where PPE and fatigues, while uncomfortable, keep you alive and unharmed. Where you choose it because your enemy would kill you or the work would burn you or tear the flesh from your bones if you didn’t.

      Which bathroom seems pretty trivial when given the choice between even more trivial stuff like heat stroke, sun poisoning, burns, callouses, and scars.

  15. a mental health facility and trauma center for a certain kind of patient … clearly reliant on unproven pseudoscience … Yellowbrick costs $28,000 per month?

    Holy L. Ron Hubbard!

    1. As an Operating Thetan VIII, I have no need for your quackery.

      I see your Scientology and raise you a Scienfoology… Scienfoology is where it’s REALLY at, see http://www.churchofSQRLS.com

    2. Ha, that was the first thing I thought of when I saw the description. All they need now is story of aliens flying to earth in 747s.

  16. I recently heard on the radio that Lady Gaga showed up at some shelter or some place and shared that she has PTSD and the whole piece was about her courage….CBC… I know. I came to the conclusion that we’re going to have to come up with a new term to describe psychic trauma that real soldiers and first responders get, now that every asshole who lost a kitten once, now has the PTSD.

    1. I saw that but didn’t want to hand over the page view it would have taken to figure out what she says caused this PTSD.

        1. Which is code for buyer’s remorse.

          1. Right, because no one is ever actually raped.

            1. “Rape” and “PTSD” are legally and medically defined. Just because Lady Gaga says she has suffered these experiences doesn’t mean she actually has. Given that victimhood and commiseration are part of her showbiz persona and business, there is some reason for doubt.

  17. Slightly OT: Some kids in Maryland staged a walk out from their high school today in protest to a fellow student using the n word on Twitter and the high school not giving them enough information to keep them safe. I must say, these snowflakes have uncovered a genius way to skip class.

    1. We just never came back from off-campus lunch, played pool and drank beer at the local hangout, and then handed in excuse notes to the office written by girlfriends. My mom went through several changes of handwriting over the course of my high school years. Was 1975 really that long ago?

      1. I filled out and signed the emergency contact card my freshman year as I was told by an older and wiser family friend that is what was used to compare handwriting for parental notes. Worked like a charm.

      2. I never bothered with notes and just told them i was busy. Nobody could figure out how I got away with it. it was simple just be matter of fact about it. I even told a few teachers to give me something to do or I was going to leave and I did.

  18. Again, the inescapable conclusion is that Yellowbrick is a con job. For one thing, it’s clearly reliant on unproven pseudoscience. “They call it a center for clinical neuroscience, as if this is [all] scientifically founded,” Carrie Bearden, a brain science expert, told Osberg

    I find it a little amusing that anyone would wave their hands and insist they’re exposing a ‘con job’…

    …and then quote a “brain science expert”.

    I sometimes wish i’d gone to Brain Science school myself.

    Look, sure – these people are hucksters. And you can poo-poo their methods. But I don’t necessarily think the problem is with their methods as much as the population they’re targeting and the faux diagnoses they’re applying.

    Meaning = there are plenty of mental health therapists who deal with genuinely ill people…. and they may often use some of the same stuff you deride as ‘unscientific’. Even within populations of clear-cut schizophrenics, the effective treatments can vary wildly. Some respond well with nothing but medication. Some need a lot of coaching.

    The problem here isn’t the ‘con’ of the therapy, but rather the ‘con’ that what they’re treating is an “Illness” rather than a attitudinal problem.

    One thing i’ve seen with these sorts of people is that the therapy itself becomes a permanent part of their lives. I know a half dozen people who’s parents started sending them to “therapy” when they were teens, and they’ve never stopped.

    1. I know a half dozen people who’s parents started sending them to “therapy” when they were teens, and they’ve never stopped.

      There’s an intensely creepy situation being broadcast on the local NPR station about a woman whose toddler is transgender. The whole thing reeks of Munchausen by proxy and conversion therapy.

  19. Nevertheless, the patient was grateful to Yellowbrick for helping her to realize that her parents would just never understand her struggles.

    I had to refresh this like eight times to convince myself this was not an article from ClickHole.

  20. “a quiet suburban street in Evanston, 14 miles north of Chicago.”

    Are you kidding? Evanston is Chicago’s northern border. It isn’t 14 FEET from Chicago. I used to live there.

  21. This sounds like a job for “Dr.” Dennis Leary’s “Shut the Fuck Up” therapy. Much cheaper a cost, as you can just pay for a copy of his “No Cure For Cancer” standup in audio or video. (Or YouTube it if you’re cheap)

    1. Or Bob Newhart’s “Stop It” therapy.

  22. I would think that it’s probably in the libertarian tradition to also to let a fool and his/her money part soon.

    1. Yeah, but isn’t also in the libertarian tradition to point at laugh at said fools? Since Robbie’s not advocating for the government to step in and shut this sham treatment center down, I don’t see a problem with basically saying “get a load of these fucktards!”

      1. ^this is what makes the whole crazy Libertarian thing work.

        You take a look over at your crackhead neighbors with missing teeth and advanced aging symptoms and you turn to little Timmy and say, “kid you do crack and that right there is your destiny.”

  23. “But the patients have been convinced?scammed may be the better word?to believe that their struggles are diagnosable, treatable, and fixable”

    The condition is fixable. Tell the little snowflake to grow up, get out of the basement and get a damn job.

    1. Tell the little snowflake to grow up, get out of the basement and get a damn job.

      i told my retarded snoflake niece to do that just last weekend. So far, still no job and still in the basement.

      1. You’re too nice, put her to work in the mine with the orphans.

      2. “So far, still no job and still in the basement.”

        You’re not locking the door properly.

      3. “You can live in the basement as long as you want. This list is your share of the household chores. Rent is due on the first of the month. Until you start paying rent, you’re the maid-of-all-work.”

  24. This isn’t really millennials’ faults, mind you

    Yes, it is. Helicopter parents and participation trophies certainly get them off on the wrong foot, but if we believe in autonomy and the potential for introspection and exploration, then people are capable of and should be expected to grow out of childhood, even if they have to do it on their own.

  25. A guy I know is a retired paramedic or EMT. He says he retired after responding to a call one day – neighbors said they could hear a screaming kid but nobody would come to the door. So he and his partner bust in.

    Mom is on the couch apparently too high to give a fuck about anything/anybody.

    Toddler has got burns over most of her body after pulling a Fry Daddy down onto herself. He didn’t say whether he managed to save her life.

    And that’s the last call he ever took. But he still, you know, functions in society. He just got a different job.

    I’ve got a relative who worked a couple of decades as a pediatric psych nurse. Kids with problems, you know. A lot of times, the problem is clearly mom & dad who just can’t deal with having kids and the kids act out, get in trouble… depression, suicide. So my relative would see the same kids come back, get worse. First the parents are bringing them in, and then the cops are bringing them in, and finally they go to prison for a while, and are taking medication their entire lives. But she remembers when they were just kids who were acting out, you know. And it gets to her, and she moves away from the pediatric part. But she’s still seeing the adults, so she moves to admissions and doesn’t deal with the patients so much. She’s near retirement age, and still works at the hospital.

    I wonder what kind of horrors these snowflakes have witnessed that leaves them seemingly completely unable to function as human beings?

    1. I wonder what kind of horrors these snowflakes have witnessed that leaves them seemingly completely unable to function as human beings?

      Uh how about the rise of the Emperor! Did you think of that one smart guy?

    2. Toddler has got burns over most of her body after pulling a Fry Daddy down onto herself. He didn’t say whether he managed to save her life.

      Jesus fucking christ.

    3. Trauma.

      27 year-old niece at my house, recently married, J-school grad from Cornell, 8 jobs so far and counting, having a meltdown because she couldn’t connect to my WiFi.

      Seriously.

      I wish this article had been written 3 weeks ago

      1. I hope you never gave her the password.

        1. She had it written down.

          She was so triggered by the dinner conversation that she couldn’t type the symbols embedded in the password.

          1. Security through immaturity – put swastikas in all your passwords.

            1. Ironically, a ‘$’ symbol was enough.

              I suspect she was typing ‘%’

      2. Some people just have emotional/mental problems. Maybe not the kind that deserves a padded cell, but a prescription of some anti-depressant or something stronger probably wouldn’t hurt.

    4. Not being able to function is the symptom. Maybe the underlying anxiety problem is a product of the modern technological environment (as seems to be a prevailing hypothesis), or maybe it’s a random epidemic of bad parenting and government coddling (more dubious). But it’s facile and counterproductive to assume that because a kid is privileged relative to someone else doesn’t mean his brain chemistry should match up to our expectations.

      1. Maybe the underlying anxiety problem is a product of the modern technological environment (as seems to be a prevailing hypothesis)

        Cite please. I want to read what evidence people blaming this on computers have.

        1. Don’t expect a citation.

          1. Don’t expect sense, either.

          2. I know Tony’s a troll, I just thought maybe he had some psych study / book / Huffington post blog post that inspired him to blame technology for fragile mentally broken snowflakes. Usually he doesn’t come up with his own retarded theories, he repeats them from somewhere.

        2. It’s the 21st century version of it’s society’s fault.

    5. I wonder what kind of horrors these snowflakes have witnessed that leaves them seemingly completely unable to function as human beings?

      Their experience? Parents who give them $28k of pocket money every month.

      It’s not a new phenomenon: shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves in three generations.

  26. Why wasn’t Reason running articles like this during the webathon? This is worth donating to! Maybe next time.

  27. It helps its patients navigate the extended period between childhood and adulthood

    Are you talking about those precious few moments that occur after your 18th birthday, when all of your actions immediately fall under the legal rubric of “adult”?

    1. More like that brief interlude between the ages of 10 and 30. For some people, “growing up” can take a while.

    2. I think he means 18 to 21.

  28. Just look at the name of the place and it’s clear that they’re premium tier subtletroll. A yellow brick is awfully like a gold brick when all you’ve got is a box of crayons. This is an institute for goldbricks, and their genius is in figure out how to extract value from them.

    1. I’m wondering if it’s even real.

    2. And here I thought they were “off to see the wizard.”
      “We aren’t in Kansas any more, Toto.”

  29. Hold on, y’all! Gonna FIX it fer y’all!!!
    $28 K / month will do a YUUUGE amount of good fer us all, here! Now here-here-here, HEAR-hear me out!
    First off, we git Government Almighty to pony up the $28 K/month for EVERYONE who needs it! Anything else is NAZI-like, and uncompassionate! Obliviously! Then we can therapeuteratize EVERYONE!!! Society will be HEALED!!!! (So cum to healed, ya all curmuddgeons, you!!!)
    OK, so as I fine-tune my tin-foil hat, I hear y’all saying, “But the Yellow Brick, they have TWO shrinks/therapists fer every patient. HOW ken we do that in society as a whole? WHO is gonna pay for ALL of THAT?!!?”
    Oh ye of little faith? The answer should be oblivious fer all to see?
    We must all deputize the voices in our heads to be the therapists! THEN the “ratio problem” (if we are all patients, but each patient needs 2 shrinks) is solved!!!
    More soon, I must refuel on Mogen-David 20-20, then all will become more clear?

    1. Are you nuts? A program run by the government would have to be staffed by credentialled professionals.

      That kind of licensing don’t come cheap, and everyone with deputized personalities would need to be separately licensed!

      1. slinks off to set up expensive credential mill ….

    2. OK, then, CLEARLY (I am a Scienfoology “CLEAR”, so STAND BACK, and BEHOLD My Wisdom!!!), we have the following problem: If we all pay the $28 K / month to our own selves, in the form of the “voices in our heads”, as who have all been deputized as our “therapists”, then a YUUUGE problem rears its ugly head: WHAT in the Sacred Name of Government Almighty is going to be left over, for our Sacred Pubic Servants?!?! Hunh?!?!
      OK then, I have a solution for this as well: This entire scheme must be stupor-vised (stupor-vised, yes, as in, those who are in a drunken stupor, drunk on their own POWAH), by, say, SMARM, which will be the be the Soul Mates And Religions Ministry. Growing up (and getting married, as a step towards adulthood, as the article mentioned), is partially a Religious / Spiritual matter. Government Almighty needs to STEP UP and take responsibility here!!!
      So kick it up to, say, $33 K / month, with $28 K set aside for your therapists (AKA, voices in yer head), and that leaves $5 K /month fer the SMARM agency, and all is solved!!! Easy-peasy!!!

      1. We could seed the program with a trillion dollar coin.

        My only question is, figuratively, who are the rats, and who are the cats?

        1. We get both the rats AND the cats to smear their poop upon the walls, and call it “art”. Each painting is sold for MILLIONS of dollars! (Even if we cannot coerce enough buyers, all cat artists and rat artists must be paid the minimum wage). There’s billions and billions of cats and rats out there! “Do that math” and ya get ALL the money we need! Economic stimulus out the wazzzzoooo!!!!

  30. At one time I was the sort of person that could have fallen into this trap. Fortunately I had parents who knew better and told me to suck it up and get a job.

    1. I think there are lots of people who could fall into this trap *IF* they have parents who are stupid enough to pay for it.

  31. In times past, things were so bad that people were happy just to survive to see another day; now they are so good that people are upset that they’re not perfect.

  32. Of course, considering the deep pockets the parents have, the second one of these patients takes their life, expect crippling wrongful death and malpractice lawsuits to occur.

  33. gen X failed as parents with no corporal punishment and ‘everybody wins’….

    1. That started with the boomers. Towards the end of the boomers, to be sure, but yeah. I still remember the no-score t-ball conversation I had with a parent when I was a young adult.

      I wasn’t even in the mindset of a “culture war” when I was legitimately perplexed at the concept. I just thought it was the strangest thing I’d ever heard.

  34. For $28,000 you could buy some MDMA and have some change left over for a nice vacation.

    MDMA for PTSD: How Ecstasy Is Helping People with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2RqLjFhks0

  35. Husband: Gee, you don’t think $28 000 a month is excessive?
    Wife: SHE NEEDS OUR HELP!
    Husband: I’m not sure being told to show up to work on time really is a traumatic experience.
    Wife: TIMES HAVE CHANGED!
    Husband (scratching back of head): I don’t know honey. We may be enabling here.
    Wife: YOU DON’T LOVE US!
    Husband (pauses): It’s not that. It’s just that…
    Wife (pulls out 12 checks): JUST SIGN HERE!

  36. This is outrageous. I can easily treat Imaginary PTSD for a mere $10,000 per month.

    And I make $600,000 per year working at home doing almost nothing!!!

  37. A reporter does more than regurgitating a Fusion article. He contacts the staff and patients of Yellowbrick for their response. It helps to give the appearance of objectivity.

  38. Yes, these problems sound familiar to me. I can’t stay in any relationship longer than 8-10 months. I’m sick of being alone, I’m sick of dating. My ex-boyfriend can’t find an appropriate job. After graduation, he started traveling. He is couchsurfer and looks for the new families to live. Now he is in Germany, found a good guy family here: https://swap-house.com/host/germany/berlin/ But it’s for some time, you know. That’s nor easy to be a millennial. But take $28,000 per month for trauma center! It’s ridiculous! It’s an ill wind that blows nobody any good…

  39. I am so pissed that I did not come up with something like this.

    I live in an affluent area with a large population of moneyed college kids. Hmm…

    1. Start a church. It’ll be tax-free, too.

      Mr. “2 Corinthians” got elected kleptocrat-in-chief. You won’t get that lucky.

      1. Look, not everyone had the special relationship with their priest that you did.

  40. Will Obama Care pay for it?

    1. If it was done by Christian Science, yes. Otherwise, you’ll have to wait till your supreme leader does that repeal and mumble mumble thing.

  41. I’ll make a guess and you people will think I’m crazy, but it’s nutrition in most cases. Sugar, specifically. A whole host of mental problems arise if you feed yourself the wrong shit, especially if you don’t take in full branch chain amino acids from things like good (generally, unsaturated) fats. They’re essential for proper brain functioning.

    I have a friend who works in an ER and reports that they’ve seen – and other ERs are seeing – a return of cases of scurvy. Fucking scurvy – in inner city hospitals. The docs were completely puzzled, too. Trying all kinds of other treatments until someone remembered something from “med school” about the symptoms of scurvy and wham-o. Sure as shit. You’ve got people surrounded by all manner of ways of getting vitamin C and they aren’t consuming enough to avoid scurvy.

    I’m telling you – this is nutritional. Get rid of sugar and you’ll see a vast array of health problems and shitty behaviors disappear. You can fine tune it after that, but it’s likely a ketogenic diet that man evolved on. You’re metabolism/mitochondria functions vastly better on ketone bodies than glucose. Read Dr. Thomas Seyfried’s “Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.”

  42. It’s a scam, of course. There doesn’t seem to be anything especially wrong with these people, in a medical sense
    Says Soave M.D. on reason.com, graduated from Trump Univ.

    “Free minds, free markets”

    Get thee to a church, so that you can get an idea of a bigger scam, and on a much wider scale, Robby.

    1. At least it’s free.

    2. #TRIGGERED

  43. I think the ubiquity of the therapy culture is the major reason Hannibal Lecter resonates with so many people. He’s basically what everyone is afraid their therapist, psychologist, etc. might be.

  44. Most people come to terms with the fact that life’s a bitch and then you die.

    My little friend Lambchop has an all purpose solution for these knuckleheads: a hoof shaped crease right up the backside. Kick ’em out and it’s sink or swim. Paying your own way has a way of focusing your attention. Especially when you take on the greatest motivational tool ever invented: the 30 year mortgage. That’ll get your sorry ass out of bed in the morning.

  45. Milennials, myself being one, are unfortunately the ultimate captive market.

  46. As someone with real issues with debilitating mental illness, things like this drive me nuts (or more so). Some kids with real issues are getting quackery instead of the real medical help they need, and the whole situation brings out the calls of “Just tell ’em to snap out of it and get a job” and such. Which is probably true in the cases of many of the “patients” of this bullcrap, but does a lot of harm to people with similar symptoms caused by actual mental illnesses.

    By all means, if the kids feel like they need counseling they should get it. Even out of pocket, though, seeing a great psychiatrist for an hour weekly is tons cheaper and they’ll get to have their issues diagnosed by an actual medical doctor – and if their issues are rooted in mental illness, they’ll get the medication and therapy they actually need rather than feel-good BS.

  47. “Nevertheless, the patient was grateful to Yellowbrick for helping her to realize that her parents would just never understand her struggles.”
    Maybe thats the case for parents who had no struggles but for us older people our parents experienced WWII and they would laugh at us if we claimed to have any kind of unsurmountable struggle school is easy compared to life in the real world.

  48. This is a 100% pure, grade A hustle. I applaud the owners. I need to start drafting a business plan.

  49. Sunrise has devoted herself to be one of the best ESL job agencies in China since it’s established, by providing ESL jobs, TEFL jobs, esol teacher jobs for ESL teachers, efl teachers. For more details, contact sunrise!

  50. Shouldn’t it be ‘Goldbrick’?

  51. A few years ago, the sociologist Jennifer Silva coined the term “mood economy,” to describe the appropriation of therapeutic language among working-class 20-somethings.

    Not just 20 somethings. I can remember when misogyny was used by shrinks to describe men with a pathological hatred of women. Now it means anyone who disagrees with a feminist, or just likes to look at hot women in bikinis.

  52. my friend’s ex-wife makes $79/hour on the internet. She has been unemployed for five months but last month her payment was $13079 just working on the internet for a few hours. check

    ==================================> http://www.homejobs7.com

  53. Good article; bad comments. Not even Szasz would be this harsh.

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