College Students Don't Want to Learn: They Want to Teach You About Identity Politics

New documentary about free speech debate at Brown University paints a scary picture.

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Brown University
Rob Montz / We the Internet

"We have spoken. We are speaking. Pay attention." Nothing captures the attitude of the modern college activist as perfectly as this statement, made by Yale University students petitioning the English department for changes to the curriculum (they wanted to read fewer white male poets).

It's the constant refrain of the far-left social justice student: Our minds are made up. The time for discussion is over. We aren't here to be educated. We are here to educate you.

This sentiment was echoed by Jasmine Adams, a member of the Black Student Union at Oberlin College, who recently told a journalist: "As a person who plans on returning to my community, I don't want to assimilate into middle-class values. I'm going home, back to the 'hood of Chicago, to be exactly who I was before I came to Oberlin."

Adams and her ilk reject the notion that the purpose of college is self-transformation. They haven't come to campus to be changed—they see themselves as the only agents of change matter.

This has dire consequences for higher education. If a small but influential group of students on campus are there with the explicit goal of drowning out and shutting down other perspectives—often with the help of the administration—it's going to make life miserable for students who do wish to learn, and professors who still think their job is to challenge young minds.

The dangers of this new campus reality are obvious in a new, short documentary released by Rob Montz, formerly of Reason TV. Returning to his alma mater, Brown University, Montz finds that campus has become a dangerous place for freethinkers. The film opens with footage from a confrontation between left-wing student activists and a pro-speech administrator. The admin tries to start a dialogue with the group, but the students shout him down, insisting that "heterosexual white males" have already done too much talking, historically speaking. When the administrator points out that he is gay, the student tells him "it don't matter."

I attended a screening of the film last week, and participated in a subsequent Q and A session about campus free speech issues with Montz and Ari Cohn of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Eduction. The Federalist wrote up my remarks:

This minority of far-left students hostile to free expression has always existed, said Robby Soave of Reason magazine. What's changed is that in the last five years they've gained institutional power. 

"[Student activists] actually started getting guidance in 2011 from the Education Department that because of harassment law, because of the requirements of Title IX and aspects of the law that funds higher education, administrators have to take students' demands seriously or the institution could lose its federal funding," he noted.

I also elaborated on many of these themes during a recent appearance on the Free Thoughts podcast for Libertarianism.org. Listen here.

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  1. “it don’t matter.”

    Ivy League, ladies & gentleman. Ivy Fucking League.

    1. I pity the fool that pays for these idiots to attend these institutions…

      1. *cough*

        I have some bad news…

  2. “(they wanted to read fewer white male poets).”

    So they should read Alexandre Dumas instead?

    1. Don’t forget Pushkin.

      “I’ll have a black Russian.”

      1. Don’t forget Zora Neale Hurston.

        (disclaimer: this letter is extreme even for me – I’m not endorsing it, just yanking the chain of the SJWs.)

        1. That would likely cause a lot of SJW heads to explode.

        2. But what if it is contemplated to do away with the two-party system and arrive at Govt by administrative decree? No questions allowed and no information given out from the administrative dept? We could get more rulings on the same subject and more far-reaching any day. It pays to weigh every saving and action, however trivial as indicating a trend.

          Tom Friedman gets a boner

          1. Paul Krugman rubs one out.

          2. But what if it is contemplated to do away with the two-party system and arrive at Govt by administrative decree?

            You mean like Henry VIII? Yeah. That was a great time to be a SJW.

        3. Hadn’t read that before – thanks!

    2. You want some fun, try talking about the Punic Wars with an Afrocentrist. Devolves into ‘despite probably being descended from Semitic Phoenicians and having no accurate description of his appearance besides his father’s apperance on coins, Hannibal was BLACK.’ pretty quickly.

      1. Oh hell, they claim Cleopatra was black.

        1. Cleopatra is at least argued in the context of her father having a black concubine (I think, been awhile since I dug through that stuff). Hannibal’s just hilarious because they desperately need a black figure challenging a traditional Western power and partially succeeding, despite zero evidence supporting that conclusion.

          1. That no major Roman historian called Hannibal black is the dog that didn’t bark.

            they’da pulled out every racial slur on the list to inslut and degrade General Barca

      2. I wonder what Afrocentrists think of Great Zimbabwe, the Songhai Empire, or the Kingdom of Aksum..

  3. What’s the point of going to college, if you want to stay exactly who you are before attending?

    1. Credentialing!

      1. ling ling ling ling ling, credentialphone

    2. They get four years of not getting shot in the “hood” while at the same time get to complain about all sorts of things such as unsafe spaces on campus or someone using a word that offends them.

      1. 4 years of day care their parents don’t have to deal with them.

      2. The people who would “get four years of not getting shot in the “hood”” are not the same people who “complain about all sorts of things such as unsafe spaces on campus or someone using a word that offends them”.

        The first set are there to actually learn and try to get out of the “hood” while the second set have probable never set foot in anything less than a middle class neighborhood let alone the “hood”.

    3. To learn useful shit? I don’t get the whole “transformation” shtick. I don’t want to be indoctrinated any more than I want to indoctrinate. Teach me how to ply a fucking trade, and give me a shiny diploma at the end. That’s all college need be about.

      1. So higher education should be a glorified Voc-Tech.

        Sounds legit.

        1. 90% of those in higher education should probably be attending voc-tech instead.

          1. 90% of those in higher education should probably be attending voc-tech instead.

            I do not disagree.

          2. The vocations these people are aspiring to are “professional victim”. They are at the right place for that.

            Universities are reaping what they sowed.

        2. Or should be separated from vocational school. One or the other. Give those of us who don’t want to pay $15k a year to “broaden our horizons” a path to advanced training, and give everybody else a place to navel gaze and practice alcoholism.

          1. Give those of us who don’t want to pay $15k a year to “broaden our horizons” a path to advanced training,

            There are. My step-dad made a good living as an admission rep for one of them.

            1. I was talking more about splitting the arts from the sciences at universities. Of course trade schools exist, but I think there should be similar schools for engineering, Science, and business degrees. As an example: Rose Hulman

              1. I was talking more about splitting the arts from the sciences at universities.

                The whole point of a university is that it is an institution composed of more than one school. If having to read Middlemarch really bothers one that much, then just go to a STEM college. It’s not as if places like Harvey Mudd College don’t exist.

                1. The whole point of a university is that it is an institution composed of more than one school.

                  The whole point of my bitching is to point out that there are schools in most universities with opposing priorities to one another, and that many of the top schools (of all disciplines) are being weighed down by other schools in their University.

                  1. When my daughter (an engineering student) was looking at schools she interviewed at Dartmouth. She literally laughed at the admissions interviewer when he told her it would take 5 years to graduate due to all the liberal arts requirements.

                2. easy to get into Harvey Mudd?

                  1. Sure – just send in an application and wait.

                    1. cool

                3. Except how many college students are actually reading Middlemarch? How many were reading it before the schools went full batshit crazy?

                  I don’t think it’s entirely wrong to say the humanities are broke. And that fact is diminishing the value of the academy across board (i.e. those in the humanities are breaking the rest of the university).

                  1. Except how many college students are actually reading Middlemarch?

                    Well, George Eliot was technically “transgendered”, no?

                    1. Perhaps.

                      I don’t think it changes my point, though. If all you’re getting out of classic literature is the identity class of the author, well, you’re probably wasting your time in the humanities.

                      But, that’s become all the humanities IS anymore. Someone interested in literature is probably better off with a library card and a set of Cliff’s Notes. I went to a liberal arts college undergrad. I value a liberal education. But, letting the whole house of cards fall in on itself before the humanities destroy the rest of the academy is probably the best of a set of bad options.

                    2. If all you’re getting out of classic literature is the identity class of the author, well, you’re probably wasting your time in the humanities.

                      We’re in full agreement there.

                4. Get back to me when the typical lib arts student can count past “more.” The basic sciences are at least as relevant to higher learning as the mental self-manipulation of joyce.

                5. Is that where you learn to peddle Venus-drugged women to lonely miners and enslave androids?

          2. Hey. I practiced alcoholism just fine at a vocational school.

      2. That is what trade school is for.

        Don’t get me wrong, I like trade schools. 8 hours a day, 5 days a week until on things that you need to do a job or have a business. Leave out all the other things, especially the things that you should have learned in 1st – 12th grade.

        1. Not entirely. Universities teach the skills needed for professions. As people have noted in part, there’s engineering, accounting, actuary, medicine, optometry, dentistry,. Even psychology and education are at least supposed to be teaching professional skills to work in a profession. Plenty more too. (alright business too if I must)

          1. Not entirely. Universities teach the skills needed for professions.

            They used to, maybe.These days, with a few exceptions related to the type of degree on is attaining, they actually teach quite the opposite, if they teach anything at all.

            1. Let’s put it as “they are supposed to”. Or to put it yet another way, such skills are taught there. Kids are surrounded by opportunity in college but our retarded culture indulges them and drives them away from it.

              The point being, I agree with the earlier statement that the point of college is “to learn useful shit”.

              1. Kids are surrounded by opportunity in college but our retarded culture indulges them and drives them away from it.

                WTF? The universities actively steer these students away from those courses. They’d rather have the tuition (for Conceptual Basket-Weaving) than risk a student taking more difficult courses (like Actual Basket Weaving) not returning and not getting the four years of tuition with the grad school option.

                Most universities, especially the Ivies, discovered “prestige” was just a matter of marketing rather than a matter of quality results.

                1. Not sure what you think rated a “WTF?” there precisely, but be that as it may, there are additional pressures on the university. Professional organizations will demand various courses be taught to accredit a major, perhaps lab work too. Professional schools will have entrance exams in addition to also just requiring certain courses. And all the stats and rankings they are trying to manipulate, are broken down by major as well.

      3. You don’t go to college for that unless you are doing engineering, hard sciences (they don’t have word studies in any of those) medicine, or accounting. If you want to do trades, got to a good trade school. Most college degrees today aren’t worth the paper they are printed on.

        1. Yeah, I’ve seen both sides of that dichotomy. Engineering school was tough and focused, and taught practice-relevant skills. Law school is an excuse to drink a lot, and leaves the students utterly unprepared for practice.

          1. Note I left law school out on purpose…..

          2. Not that LSAT is necessarily indicative of capacity/aptitude, but the apparent poor performance of Prelaw undergrad degree holders on the LSAT compared to other undergraduate majors (Table 2) is hilarious.

          3. Law school is an excuse to drink a lot, and leaves the students utterly unprepared for practice.

            Having done IT work for a variety of law firms, I can tell you that drinking a lot is preparation for practicing law, especially if you make partner.

  4. Just think how great it will be when college is “free”, and anyone can go without having to be serious about it.

    1. That’s going really raise the bar and make the students value the opportunity.

      1. Not to mention, produce some quality employees for the work force!

    1. That is future President of the United States of America Trigglypuff!!!!

      1. And also the rarest of the Pok?mon

        1. But not rare enough [sigh]

  5. “As a person who plans on returning to my community, I don’t want to assimilate into middle-class values. I’m going home, back to the ‘hood of Chicago, to be exactly who I was before I came to Oberlin.”

    Never thought I’d say it, but I have something in common with Jasmine here. I, too, want her to go home and be unheard.

    1. to be exactly who I was before I came to Oberlin

      Well, that and a hundred grand in debt.

      1. doubt xe had to pay

  6. they see themselves as the only agents of change matter.

    WTF is “change matter”? Is this like dark matter? Antimatter? Paneer matter?

    1. It’s all part of Hope and Change.

  7. No, these particular loudmouth idiots are in college to whine. The overwhelming majority of students are there to improve themselves and pay no attention to these retards.

    1. You may not pay attention to social justice, but social justice pays attention to you.

  8. Careful, Robby. You’re going to ruin what people think of you with a well-done post like this.

    1. Robby’s good for one damn fine article out of every 4 or 5, which is about right for a writer.

      1. Yeah, thats a pretty good record.

    2. He shit the bed pretty hard yesterday.

    3. We’re calling him Fruit Sushi now.

      1. No I thanks, I won’t participate in Robby bashing. He’ll always be Rico Suave to me.

  9. “Adams and her ilk reject the notion that the purpose of college is self-transformation.”

    Look Robby, I’m a millennial too, but what the fucking fuck?

    1. He means black people. I assume.

      1. Paging Irish

        1. Haven’t seen Irish in ages. Did he change names like the rest of y’all flighty hoes?

          1. Good question. I don’t change my name; I rarely post because by the time I get around to reading this stuff it’s usually been dead for hours.

            1. were we supposed to change names? is this ’cause of the woodchipper?

              1. is this ’cause of the woodchipper?

                When I was Preet Bharara, yes. Otherwise, just boredom. Like when commoditous used to be Nikki.

                1. Is commoditous actually Nikki? I left for work travel for a couple months and suddenly the comments are full of new handles and trolls. Glad I got back before Gilmore became Dennis or I’d be really confused.

                  1. Commoditous is whoever you want her to be, sugar.

                    Except for that spittoon guy, he was a real asshole

          2. Yeah, where is that racist?

    2. You don’t think education is transformative?

      1. The idea that college needs to be transformative is, inherently, fucking stupid. The idea behind education is to fine-tune your thought process and to harden good methods for unbiased conclusions. It’s to give you skills to succeed in the future. Whether this is transformative or not depends on how competent you are entering college.

  10. Robby needs to develop a thick skin, Sam Kriss has already called him a dweeb.

      1. Nobody really.

  11. The one surprising thing these students all have in common? Engineering majors.

    1. Everyone knows that your choice of major in undergraduate studies are the true and final measure of your utility to the rest of the planet.

      1. No, but it certainly can guide the trajectory for the rest of your life.

        1. About a quarter of graduates work in a field that relates to their degree.

          It really doesn’t matter much.

          1. Depends on the major. Random humanities degree? Doesn’t matter. Biomedical engineering? Matters quite a bit.

            It’s really hard to have a general conversation on this because of the enormous gulf between how Liberal Arts and STEM degrees are treated.

            1. “It’s really hard to have a general conversation on this”

              Not really.

              Generally, about a quarter of graduates work in a field related to their major.

              1. The deviation is between 53.3% for accounting majors and 1.3% for liberal arts majors according to Table 1 of the study.

                Idk about you, but I’m not willing to treat 53.3% and 1.3% the same.

                  1. /thread

                1. Why don’t you go look at what the CEOs of the fortune 500 majored in and then get back to me about how incredibly important your undergraduate major really is.

                  1. You mean the actual exceptions to the rules type people?

                2. If fine with it in the context of “generally” and “college”.

                  1. *I’m not If

                3. accounting majors

                  Accounting is a “major”?

                  I thought it was a class. for basketball players.

      2. I have a degree that says I was allowed to go to law school after a proper 4 year vetting.

        1. Requiring seven years of post-high school education to practice law is one the biggest swindles out there. It could easily be an undergraduate major.

          1. The first year of law school is a “you have it or you don’t/you like this or you don’t” anyways, so why not cut the shit and let people give it a go straight off. It’s not like you couldn’t switch majors after a year instead of blowing infinitely more numbers of dollars on post-grad. Two years is plenty anyways with experience, outside of some scheduling/seminar conflicts, no one I know really got much out of their third year.

            1. so why not cut the shit

              To keep labor supply down and wages up. See: licensure.

              1. I was looking for a good reason, not the actual reason. But dead on in your analysis.

    2. As a young dumbass I started out as a psych major. I was sitting in my first 2000 level class one day and the prof was going on about how no one theory fits any one case you have to combine different aspects and make a checklist and it just hit me; ‘this is a bunch of horse shit.’

      I had already developed an interest in bio and chem so I went and changed my major to that…something concrete and verifiable.

      It may not be a lot of things but choosing a hard science major is an indication of a personality type that has a low tolerance for bullshit.

      1. Absolutely agree Suthenboy. Did engineering AE/EE, worked in that filed for a fun few years, then decided to pay my bills writing software, specifically because I couldn’t take nonsense masquerading as important information seriously. I and kept getting in trouble with the people that thought that crap, and told me it had to be taken seriously.

      2. Good plan.

        Psychology pays shit.

  12. It’s NOT about creating an intellectual space.

  13. The desire to never change is interesting to me, because it infers that the person is egotistical enough to believe that they are perfect/near-perfect in their current state, or they are unwilling to change due to some emotional response to the idea of change itself (fear, anxiety, etc.).

    1. But if someone refuses to ‘change’ ie bend to their views, then they’re deemed ignorant (and all the other charges that follow like racist, misogynist etc.).

      1. She’s a black woman and thus can’t be hit with those charges.

    2. Is there a difference between transformation and growth? I would argue that there is. I see college as a place for growth. Transformation implies indoctrination to me.

      1. Well, growth is a form of transformation, just as regression is.

        “Transformation implies indoctrination to me.”

        It’s just a change. The implications of the word are a result of your experiences, but it doesn’t mean that to me, or imply it.

        1. It’s just a change. The implications of the word are a result of your experiences, but it doesn’t mean that to me, or imply it.

          This likely explains our different reactions to “transformation” in a college context.

          At a 10,000 foot level, I struggle with the idea that students are signing up en masse for these “broadening” classes for the purpose of having their opinions challenged and remolded by an academic. It seems that one could read a book or three if they were interested in such things, and save a few grand. Instead, many of these classes and departments survive off of being required if you want to complete a different major. That feels extremely paternalistic to me, especially in the “college is basically required” societal climate of today.

          1. “I struggle with the idea that students are signing up en masse for these “broadening” classes for the purpose of having their opinions challenged and remolded by an academic. It seems that one could read a book or three if they were interested ”

            YOU LIKE APPLES?

            No, seriously though, not everyone knows what they do and don’t know. Sometimes an outside perspective is necessary.

            1. So their “betters” in the administration should force the students to take the class that they “truly need?”

              Let’s call a spade a spade here. A large portion of the students who take many of these race, gender, and sexuality classes are doing so because they’re required to satisfy their SJW indoctrination credit to finish their degree plan.

              1. “So their “betters” in the administration should force the students to take the class that they “truly need?””

                If those students choose to enroll there knowing the requirements?

                No one is forcing anyone to do anything.

                1. Just because there’s no force doesn’t make something good. It’s really freaking stupid to have SJW indoctrination be one of the obstacles between a high school graduate and the most common credential for obtaining a well-paying job.

                  1. Um, I don’t disagree.

                    I never really did. At this point I think you’re having an argument with something else, so I’ll say, have a grwat day!

      2. I see growth as a type of transformation, like how humans are a type of ape.

      3. A frilly pink thing covered it pretty well, but I was more talking about the difference between people who reject positive change in general in favour of stagnant egotism. You should always been willing to recognize that you are not perfect, that there is always room for self-improvement, and strive to make yourself better.

      4. College IS a place for growth. Hence the Freshman 15.

    3. It’s called “reaping what the education self-esteem movement” sowed.

  14. “As a person who plans on returning to my community, I don’t want to assimilate into middle-class values. I’m going home, back to the ‘hood of Chicago, to be exactly who I was before I came to Oberlin.”

    The Shuttening.

    And they want YOU to pay for their (mis) education.

    1. That’s where most of Europe at least partially gets their ‘free’ university right. Low grades? To the trade schools with you! It heavily incentivizes education that actually serves an economic purpose.

      The idea of both having ‘free’ university education and allowing people to make profoundly stupid choices at the same time is utter madness.

    2. I’m more than willing to bet this individual is not from the hood.

      1. Straight outta Oberlin
        A whiny-ass bitch
        My degree shows I’m enlightened
        Though it won’t make me rich.

        1. You have nothing on that “woke” kid. Except reality, I hope.

          1. And a fanatical devotion to the Pope.

            1. I know where that joke comes from, but I’ll reply as if you were serious:

              Devotion to the papal office, regardless of who fills it. Sometimes the Lord tests this commitment by putting…interesting…people into the See of Peter…

              1. “I know where that joke comes from, but I’ll reply as if you were serious”

                Eddie, never change.

    3. OH we’re gonna pay for their education. They’ll make us.

    4. I don’t understand why everyone is squealing like a stuck pig over this. If it were Jane McWhitegirl, a member of the Ag-Sciences Club at Oberlin “As a person who plans on returning to my community, I don’t want to assimilate into middle-class values. I’m going home, back to the family farm in West Bumfuck, Oklahoma, to be exactly who I was before I came to Oberlin.” She would be hailed as the Lobster Girl. I thought “middle-class values” around these parts represented faggy stuff like watching your kids in the yard when they play as opposed to being passed out on the couch at 11 AM. Things like that.

      I mean, I get the independent variable here, but do you all really have to make it that blatant?

      1. *as the next Lobster Girl

        1. Only if she appeared in Playboy’s Farmers’ Daughter Edition

            1. “they see themselves as the only agents of change matter.”

              is “change matter” like the cosmological constant?

      2. Eh, speak for yourself. I like boring middle class people, but that’s probably because I was raised in West Bumfuck, Ontario, the provincial capital of alcoholism, generational poverty, drug abuse and “hold my beer and watch this.”

        1. In America we call that “West Virginia”

        2. +1 Chronicles of Sarnia

      3. Solid attempt, wasn’t quite enthusiastic or insistent enough.

        6 out of 10.

        1. Just calling it in, nowhere nearly enough snideness or bitter resentment.

          See me after class.

          Grammar and Mechanics: B
          Content: D+

          1. Haters gonna hate.

            1. And players gonna play, play, play, play, play.

      4. Are there farmers who aren’t middle class?

        1. In the US, I mean

          1. Don’t make the mistake of confusing social class with socio-economic status. Of all the utterly ghastly Americanisms, that is the most utterly ghastly.

            1. I caught a Gastly the other day. /millennial

            2. Gosh, I know. Aren’t I just revolting?

              1. and by the way, I know farmers aren’t part of the landed gentry (just blame my ignorant American-ness), but seeing as though I’ve never met any in the midwest….not sure how they’re relevant to our “social class”

                1. meh, the parenthesis bit was supposed to go after “midwest”

        2. Are there farmers who aren’t middle class?

          Ask any farmer, he’ll tell you how poor he is. He must be poor if he’s eligible for an ag subsidy check.

          That’s why HM’s post was so stupid: farmers and inner-city Negroes are the two main recipients of welfare.

          1. Ask any farmer, he’ll tell you how poor he is. He must be poor if he’s eligible for an ag subsidy check.

            Including David Rockefeller Jr, Paul Allen, Charles Schwab, and Penny Pritzker.

      5. “As a person who plans on returning to my community, I don’t want to assimilate into middle-class values. I’m going home, back to the family farm in West Bumfuck, Oklahoma, to be exactly who I was before I came to Oberlin.” She would be hailed as the Lobster Girl.”

        I would think she is a dumb bitch just like I think the other one is a dumb bitch.

        1. I have never doubted the sincerity of your principles, Suthen.

          *firm, manly handshake*

      6. What, no video attached?

        /nods in disappointment.

          1. That’s more like it.

            /plops on chesterfield.

          1. /pulls Lee by the ear, drags him to the door, kicks him in the ass and throws him out of shed-house.

  15. “This has dire consequences for higher education. If a small but influential group of students on campus are there with the explicit goal of drowning out and shutting down other perspectives?often with the help of the administration?it’s going to make life miserable for students who do wish to learn, and professors who still think their job is to challenge young minds.”

    Suppressing my inner Alan Bloom, have to ask, what’s with all this whining? Students who do wish to learn should find another college or university – that’s what the free market’s about, isn’t it? And if they think that they’ve been conned out of good money, then take it to court. Who has ever been conscripted to attend Brown? Same for professors who still think their job is to challenge young minds – who is forcing them to work at Brown or any other congregation of far-left students hostile to free expression who’ve gained institutional power? Sure, it’s aesthetically ugly and there will be business consequences, if administrators let their brand deteriorate and lose clientele. But there are plenty of university programs that do and will offer a better product. Hillsdale, for example, appears to be earning superior rents by targeting an audience particularly anxious about “dire consequences.” The scandal is that taxpayers often subsidize this BS, but it is not that life is now miserable for some students and professors. If they chose to stay in a miserable place, then that’s their choice.

  16. Correct me if I am wrong, but weren’t liberal arts first concived as a program for the landed gentry’s idiot sons to go become more ‘cultured’?

    1. More like there was an affirmative action program for the aristocratwits, they didn’t invent the liberal arts they’d be too dumb for that.

    2. No, they were first conceived as the educationall free men should receive in order to be able to meaningfully participate in representative government.

      1. So, yes.

    3. Renaissance man — A man who has broad intellectual interests and is accomplished in areas of both the arts and the sciences.

      A liberal arts degree was supposed to educate you about everything.

  17. I had to go back and read this gem to make myself feel better. I love it when their ideology meets reality.

    Intern Fired for Dress Code Petition
    https://reason.com/blog/2016/06…..etition-is

  18. If they come to college without any intention of learning, they damn well ought to be failed out after a semester.

  19. My buddy’s step-mother makes $96 an hour on this PC. She has been fired for 9 months but last month her payment was $9600 just working on the PC for a few hours. Check It out what she do..

    ========= http://www.CareerPlus90.com

  20. Returning to his alma mater, Brown University, Montz finds that campus has become a dangerous place for freethinkers.

    Has become? HAS become?

    HAS BECOME?!?!?!?!?!?

    Do you think Woodrow Wilson was a fluke? Please. College has always been where minds go to die.

    1. I thought that line was particularly funny for mentioning Brown.

      Brown always had a reputation as a “joke school”. When was it the bastion of ‘freethinking’ again?

      Kids who went to Bard or Antioch might have been considered ‘left-wing’ by association; but Brown had a unique combination of “lefty” and “incredibly lazy”. It was the ‘safety school’ for parents who demanded their kids go to an “ivy”, no matter how mediocre.

      In my day the term “underwater basket weaving” was often used in association with Brown grads. And the grade-inflation was notorious. A friend who went there said “less than a B” was effectively impossible.

  21. Listen, you can’t be a professional “Community Organizer” or “Activist” without a degree from a liberal arts or Ivy League school. Leave those kids alone!

  22. It seems to me there is a niche in the “college review” ,market crying out to be exploited.

    Somebody (FIRE, perhaps) should be posting Intellectual Freedom rankings.

    1. My alma mater has fallen WAY down the in the ratings after some recent fuckery. Sad.

      1. Wanna trade? Mine doesn’t even have a red fire rating…but I’ll trade

        1. DO you want to go to a liberal arts school with a bunch of rich suburban kids playing “hippie” for 4 years and a bunch of uber-wealthy Ay-rabs? Then my alma mater is for you!

          1. In undergrad I went to a northeastern country club in the south. Very liberal arts. Proto-SJW. Sounds a lot like where you describe. My law school…well Rob-o has written multiple articles about it.

            I meant the degrees based on value lost….I don’t want to be on any campus in the near future.

  23. RE: College Students Don’t Want to Learn: They Want to Teach You About Identity Politics
    New documentary about free speech debate at Brown University paints a scary picture.

    Brown, one of the most elite re-education camps in the USA, has finally evolved into a totalitarian entity all of us little people covet so much. What a better place to eliminate free speech via political correctness than a place where the students pay an outrageous tuition to introduce one of the most important concepts of socialist thought, the elimination of other people’s opinions. The over educated useful idiots indoctrinated these students have wisely instructed their naive and ignorant students of the benefits of censoring the masses. One should emulate and applaud these young students at Brown for their efforts to further erode the unnecessary and antiquated US Constitution, especially free speech. It is only through a one way discourse can the propaganda provided for us by wise and prudent progressives can we be properly enslaved by the socialist filth who do everything in their power to oppress daily.
    Kudos to the Brown and their students for showing the world how tolerant they are of other people’s opinions.

  24. I was a Liberal Arts major. I have a Bachelor of Arts. There was a time when the sciences were a significant part of the liberal arts.

  25. This has probably been going on forever. One of my favorite books is Barefoot Boy with Cheek by Max Schulman. He wrote it over 70 years ago about the mythical University of Minnesota. It has it all: social Justice Warriors (aka communist rabble rousers), professors who rewrite their textbook every year so students can’t buy old versions, football players taking bribes, ridiculous classes that make the students “well rounded” rather than being able to do something. I highly recommend it.

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