Michele Leonhart's Office Declines to Comment on Reports That DEA's Mexican Law Enforcement Partners Are Murdering and Torturing People

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The Drug Enforcement Administration has offices in Mexico City, Guadalajara, Hermosillo, Ciudad Juarez, Matamoros, Mazatlan, Merida, Monterrey, Nogales, Nuevo Laredo, and Tijuana, but it doesn't have anything to say about a recently issued State Department report that says its partners in Mexico's security forces have "engaged in unlawful killings, forced disappearances, and instances of physical abuse and torture" while fighting the war on drugs. 

Earlier today, I emailed the DEA's public affairs office with this request: 

The State Department recently released a report on human rights abuses in Mexico. That report found that Mexican military and LEOs "engaged in unlawful killings, forced disappearances, and instances of physical abuse and torture" while fighting TCOs. 

I was wondering if your office could provide me with a statement about the new report in light of Administrator Michele Leonhart's earlier claim, made to the Washington Post, in which she said, "It may seem contradictory, but the unfortunate level of violence is a sign of success in the fight against drugs….[cartels] are like caged animals, attacking one another," as it seems cartels are not the only people in Mexico committing violence. 

Here is how the DEA responded: 

We will let the State Department and Mexico speak to this rather than us

I wrote back: 

If the DEA won't comment on the report, can you at least tell me if Administrator Leonhart stands by her claim that the "the unfortunate level of violence is a sign of success" in the war on drugs?

The DEA: 

She has been consistent that the violence represents the pressure cartels feel from Mexican law enforcement/military and the U.S.

Me: 

But [she] has no comment on violence perpetrated by DEA partners in Mexican military and law enforcement? 

The DEA: 

nope

The agency's silence is a bit surprising, considering that in January 2010, a U.S. diplomat praised the DEA's training of the Mexican military: "Our ties with the military have never been closer in terms of not only equipment transfers and training, but also the kinds of intelligence exchanges that are essential to making inroads against organized crime."

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  1. Nope

    Such a professional response!

    1. You have to read between the lines. What they were really saying was “Fuck you, that’s why.”

    2. Kristen,

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      http://www.royalenfield.com/mo…..x?model=10

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    3. Hey Krisen,

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      Look them up. I would put the link for them on but Reason’s spam filter kicks it back.

      1. Hunh. Apparently those are coming with fuel injection now. That’s pretty awesome.

  2. Wait, did they really write ‘nope’?

    1. Yep.

      1. If they weren’t such a despicable organization, that would be hilarious.

        1. It’s the Friday before a three day (federal-centric!) holiday weekend. Given the agency the bureaucrat works for, I find it rather humanizing.

          1. I hereby award you with the President’s Medal Of Silver Lining Appreciation.

    2. Is it that surprising? Government bureaucrats are nothing more than private sector rejects (with no accountability) so this level of eloquence is really all that’s required.

  3. No nope without dope.

  4. “The agency’s silence is a bit surprising”

    Is it really?

    1. In context of the history of Merida Initiative, yes. They used to crow about it.

      1. Well if they did comment, youd just be doing stuff like checking their facts and showing that they are liars, so I cant really blame them.

        I guess your surprise threshold is just lower than mine. Or higher, I’m not sure how that works.

        1. I guess your surprise threshold is just lower than mine. Or higher, I’m not sure how that works.

          Lower. It’s like a hill, the further you have to climb that hill to be surprised, the higher the threshold.

      2. I always read that as “Mierda Initiative”

        1. That way makes a lot more sense 🙂

  5. Paper reduction act: http://saveaward2010.ideascale…..60701-9432

  6. You think they get the good whores at all those Mexican DEA offices?

    1. They’re at least smart enough to pay them. Of course, they’re using stolen seized money.

  7. Top. Men.

  8. Considering that the DEA in San Diego locked a guy in a cell with no food or water for five days, maybe she considers this stuff good police work.

  9. I was going to ask how many offices the Mounties had in the US, but the answer appears to be four.

  10. the violence represents the pressure cartels feel from Mexican law enforcement/military and the U.S.

    Why doesn’t this make everybody sick? Our tax dollars at work “represents” the killing of women and children in other countries. We are a country that gets upset over dog and rooster fighting, but this seems to not bother anyone.

    1. They’re mexicans. It’s not like they’re real people.

  11. re: violence =/= success

    Ah. So the murder rate in Baltimore is a clear sign of the success of the city’s efforts to reign in, uh… murder.

    Wait – what?

  12. Huh, I just realized that we’re the Thalmor. And weed is Talos.

  13. “It may seem contradictory, but the unfortunate level of violence is a sign of success in the fight against drugs….[cartels] are like caged animals, attacking one another,”

    Put me in mind of this.

    Walton Simons: This plague — the rioting is intensifying to the point where we may not be able to contain it.

    Bob Page: Why contain it? Let it spill over into the schools and churches, let the bodies pile up in the streets. In the end, they’ll beg us to save them.

    Walton Simons: I’ve received reports of armed attacks on shipments. There’s not enough vaccine to go around, and the underclasses are starting to get desperate.

    Bob Page: Of course they’re desperate. They can smell their deaths, and the sound they’ll make rattling their cages will serve as a warning to the rest.

    Walton Simons: Mmm. I hope you’re not underestimating the problem. The others may not go as quietly as you think — intelligence indicates they’re behind the problems in Paris.

    Bob Page: A bunch of pretentious old men playing at running the world. But the world left them behind long ago. We are the future.

  14. N is right under H on the QWERTY keyboard. It’s an election season typo.

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